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Old 04-21-2017, 07:40 PM
garyd9 garyd9 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
Absolutely. Be aware that the hub does not get hurt, but the controller gets destroyed. I generally use the SP controller that comes with the case (I have a 570x) instead of the HD one unless you plan to re-use the SP fans. If you just get the servo cables mentioned in the thing, you don't need to sacrifice the controller.
Sounds like it doesn't make sense to NOT get the cables.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
"Shaky hands" is a very subjective thing, so I can't speak for anything in particular. If you decide to solder, I'd recommend that you put it front to back, then solder on the back side of the board. Nothing to destroy. I can't attach the example fvideo here though. Too big and I'm not keen on posting segments to YouTube.
That might be feasible... As for shaky hands, I can solder a PL259 connector, or two wires together, but when it comes to pretty much anything surface mounted or on a PCB, I'm in trouble.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
The main() function is hidden and handled in the background by the IDE. Instead you write a setup() function that runs initial one-time setup code and then a loop() function that loops indefinitely in main(). The IDE and such basically makes void main() { setup(); while (1) ( loop(); } } ... There's other stuff, but yeah. :)
Okay, I can handle that. I was concerned that it was yet another perversion of a real language. Sometimes I really wish these people would just create entirely new languages instead of variants of existing languages. It makes my life hard when the rules are "almost the same as" something else (but not quite the same... that leads the errors.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
Certain programming rules don't apply because of the way the processor works. For example:
Code:
uint8_t i = 255;
i++; // i becomes zero and does not overflow the value into the next byte.
uint8_t x = i / 0; // x == 0. There is no Divide by zero error.
int8_t y = i / 0; // x == -1. There is no divide by zero error.
You have about 28.5K worth of compiled code space to work with.
I can deal with processor differences, and 28K is a massive amount of space compared to where I started my development life.

The thing about it restarting and not crashing, however, is disturbing. I wonder if there's a way to get the thing to actually crash in order to allow postmortem debugging. If it just restarts, you lose the state...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
The hardware and code as described are software only. ...
So, currently, you have to use the Arduino IDE to change the lighting patterns? You say that you've also had it work the CLI... The windows command prompt?

Is it just writing to a COM port? That would probably be enough for me to get excited. ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charixfox View Post
Due to the number of settings in the various functions, it would be an interesting challenge to make a non-insane three-button control system that didn't require three tons of button pushes.
I'm thinking of the three button controller thing that comes with the fans (and with the corsair crystal cases.) The speed button could probably retain it's purpose. I'm not sure about the other two, but if the light patterns can be represented as strings of bytes, then perhaps the buttons could just change the "current" string.

So, for example, you use software to pre-load 5 or 6 of your favorite patterns into the Arduino's memory (from a virtually unlimited library stored on the PC.) Then you can use the hard buttons to step through the different patterns.

..That leads to another question: Is the memory on the Arduino board persistent, or does everything have to be reloaded each time power cycles?

BTW, my wife just caught me reading/replying to this post (with an amazon page open in another browser.) She now hates you. LOL. Her words:

"Between hockey playoffs, you delidding and getting your computer working, and now another project, I'm never going to see you again, am I?"
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