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Fan config in 570x


cortmans
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I’m doing the new build (the one in my specs) and I have tried a couple ways to configure my fans and I am quite new to things like push-pull, etc. and I wanted to see if this configuration would be optimal.

 

I have one exhaust fan at the back and two intake fans at the top, as well as three 120 mm intake fans on the front, then to the left an H150i PRO, and then to the left of that, three of the included ml120s to pull from the rad to the rest of the case.

 

I have a couple questions. Is this enough exhaust, and if this configuration is optimal, where should I plug in the cables from the ml120s if all 6 fan ports on my commander pro are filled by the other 6 ll120 fans if I want to control everything via Corsair link.

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That is the configuration used by many 460/570 owners to try and promote a strong intake bias. I think I would prefer the top as exhaust for more balance and quick radiator heat out, but the point is debatable and I’ll defer to someone who owns the case.

 

As for control, simple fix is put one bank of 3 radiator fans on the H150i and the other bank of 3 individually on the C-Pro. You can control both from coolant temp in Link (H150i Pro Temp) or several others. All of your fans will be Link controllable with separate curves if needed for the two banks. This is especially useful if they are of different specifications.

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Good Post c-attack :) ..

 

To add.. by running the tops as intake it tends to cut down the dust bunny's massively in my 570x imho. just the rear as exhaust. enough holes and gaps in case and around edge of the glass for excess air/heat to escape and cant say as i suffers heat build up.. I have the H150i in push/pull also.. works well and as said already, 3 fans on pump and 3 on Commander Pro.

 

have a read here for info and idea's ;)

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=173880

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This is the perfect post, cortmans, because I’m in the same predicament as you except I haven’t installed my H150i Pro yet. When I do I’m debating whether to switch my two top HD140s from exhaust (as configured now) to intake; basically leaving just one rear fan providing exhaust.

 

As Zotty says there are enough spaces throughout the 570x case for air to escape and cut down on dust with an intake heavy set-up; yet I lean toward c-attack’s line of reasoning to maintain better balance between exhaust and intake.

 

It’s a conundrum that I’ve been mulling over for the last couple of weeks as I prepare to move forward with the next round of upgrades headlined by the H150i Pro.

 

What to do...what to do...

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No reason not to try both. Flipping the top fans is a 5-10 min job. Go with your instincts, run it for a few weeks and get used to things. Then change it up and see how it compares. If it's a disaster, go back to the other, but likely we are talking about narrow margins both ways.
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That's very true. It's not a huge job to switch around the fans. I will switch out the top fans to intake and see how it goes.

 

Sometimes just preparing to make a change in the PC takes time -- unplugging components, gathering tools, clearing a work space, taking apart the case, etc. At least for me it does since I'm quite deliberate and still new to PC building/modifying.

 

Right now, because I have a couple of new components (AIO, 16 more gigs of RAM, a 3rd NoPro + expansion LED kit) to install, I'm going to wait until I have everything ready and then set aside a couple of hours to install all the upgrades at once.

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  • 2 years later...
Here's a guide on the proper fan direction. The top fans should act as exhaust because hot air rises upwards, and having the top fans as intake will just push that hot air down, back into the chassi.

Oh, dear god. Here we go again.

 

First, let's be clear about the physics involved here. Denser materials (in this case, air), sink and less dense materials float. Now - if all other things are equal, cooler air is denser than warmer air but all other things aren't always equal. Humidity, especially, can make warmer air denser than cooler air and thereby make the warmer air sink. So it's about density, not temperature. Within a small semi-enclosed space like a computer system, it's safe enough to assume that humidity won't be different so cooler air will be denser than warmer air. But let's be clear about the physics involved.

 

Now, with that said, there's one very, very important caveat not mentioned - this is when there are no other stronger, prevailing forces involved. Thermal convection isn't very strong. It happens but not quickly, especially with the small volumes of air that we are talking about in a case. Put a fan or two in the mix? Thermal convection is a much less significant factor. A couple of fans will so thoroughly overcome the thermal convection that you can ignore it. Fill a case like the 570X with 7 fans? Convection is so thoroughly irrelevant that any discussion of it is an exercise in absolute silliness. The purpose of the fans is to overcome and overrule the normal behavior of the air and to direct cooler and warmer air where you want it to go instead of where it wants go to. So babbling on about "hot air rises" is completely and totally pointless. Once upon a time, when computer systems didn't have fans or only had a single fan (usually in the PSU), it was relevant. These days? Not so much. In a case with six or seven fans? Pointless.

 

When putting fans in a case, you need to consider a) where the cooler air needs to be and b) where the warmer air is going to be forced to go. When you have more intake than exhaust, you are forcing more air into a limited, enclosed space that you are forcing out of it. Now, where does this go? Obviously, it has to go somewhere or you'd blow the sides off your case (literally). This extra volume escapes the case through the numerous cracks and crevices that are all around the case. This has the extra benefit of preventing dusty air (from the outside) from getting into the case ... keeping it cleaner (assuming, of course, that your intake fans have filters ... if they don't, it's somewhat pointless). Commercial buildings use the same technique. Ever feel the gush of air when you open the doors on an office building? Same thing. Using temperature sensors at various parts of the case (like those that come with the Commander Pro) will show you how well (or not) you are managing the heat around the case and can also help identify hot spots that can be created by turbulence or dead zones and help you better fine tune your overall case flow.

 

In closing all of this ranting, in my 280X, the warmest spot in the entire case is the lower (yes, lower) back corner of the case. When running an extended load, it'll get a good 10C higher than the area of the case at the top, just over the VRMs. If, as you say, "warm air rises", then why would the lowest point of the case in the very rear of the case be so much warmer than the top, where all of the hot air should rise to?

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