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i9-12900K with H100i ELITE CAPELLIX


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Anyone having issues keeping their CPU cool with this cooler?

Prime95 and Cinebench both get the CPU up to 100C relatively quickly, just wondering if other people are having the same issue and if so, did upsizing their cooler help?

The machine will be used for rendering and other intensive multi-core operations.

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You may be pulling 250-300W with that so I am not surprised you’re having issues. However, if you hit 100C almost instantly, then that is a cpu/voltage issue and no cooler size can fix that. On the other hand if you start of at 85C and then it slowly and steadily increases up to 100C over several minutes, then the cooling system is being overwhelmed. 
 

Cpu renders are long duration loads so watts over time definitely matters. I would want a 360mm radiator for my 10900k. I expect you will want the same or the largest you can fit. While it may only be a handful of degrees different between a 240mm with fans fully maxed out and a 360mm at moderate speed, that noise reduction plus temp reduction usually makes this worthwhile. 

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May be worth checking bios settings if you haven't got one of those with MCE unleashed and power limits completely maxed.

250 - 300W continuous under reasonable temps is pretty much custom loop territory, so you may want to make sure your motherboard doesn't make the CPU exceed the nominal TDP.

when it falls back to 125W it will be easy too.

If you have good airflow, you could then increase the power limit up to temperatures you're comfortable with.

 

But typically motherboards will either enforce Intel's specs, running 'cool", or disable power limits entirely going full throttle.

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15 minutes ago, LeDoyen said:

May be worth checking bios settings if you haven't got one of those with MCE unleashed and power limits completely maxed.

250 - 300W continuous under reasonable temps is pretty much custom loop territory, so you may want to make sure your motherboard doesn't make the CPU exceed the nominal TDP.

when it falls back to 125W it will be easy too.

If you have good airflow, you could then increase the power limit up to temperatures you're comfortable with.

 

But typically motherboards will either enforce Intel's specs, running 'cool", or disable power limits entirely going full throttle.

Used Intel Tuning Utility to monitor things and it's definitely pulling 260W and thermal throttling.  I'll look into motherboard settings.  Thank you for the tip.

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If you're getting to 98C pretty quick, then you likely want to take a look at the BIOS settings as suggested.  Most motherboards are overclocking right out of the box these days, with power limit overrides and all core frequency boosting.  That all can still be OK, but probably not on auto voltage.  Find out what it is running at max AVX2 stress testing and then the normal peak value.  See how it compares to other 12900K users.  

Edited by c-attack
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15 hours ago, c-attack said:

If you're getting to 98C pretty quick, then you likely want to take a look at the BIOS settings as suggested.  Most motherboards are overclocking right out of the box these days, with power limit overrides and all core frequency boosting.  That all can still be OK, but probably not on auto voltage.  Find out what it is running at max AVX2 stress testing and then the normal peak value.  See how it compares to other 12900K users.  

Is there a better place than Reddit to find other users to compare against?  I've been reading and it's all over the place.  Some people are even having success overclocking with a 360mm rad, which is the opposite of what I'm dealing with.

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Usually there is a cpu specific thread on the Overclock.net forum. Motherboard specific ones as well. You should be able to get a feel for what most people are setting for Vcore by skimming through. As always, it’s going to be silicon specific. Asus boards have a SP score for the CPU now that make it easy to compare, but I am not sure if the others have implemented something similar yet.  I skipped this upgrade round and have not been following the discussion. 

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Just wondering, why is the OP so much focused on cinebench or other benchmark temps. In real life you will not be pushing your CPU like any benchmark (at least not for extended periods of time), so you should not be focused too much on cinebench temps. Even if you do video rendering you will hardly push your cpu at max for a few minutes.

I have a 11900k, and those CPU's are known for running very hot also as mentioned due to the power they draw when pushed unlimited (settings you can control via your MOBO bios or intel software in Windows). So I installed the capellix cooler with 240mm rad into my old Alienware area51-R2 case. Then I was running cyberpunk on 4k monitor with maxed settings and the CPU would thermal throttle with the side panel of my case closed. Without side panel my CPU would run around 81-82 degrees in Cyberpunk. Recently I swapped the Capellix 240mm for a 360mm version. The result was that in Cyberpunk now my CPU runs around 66-67 degrees instead of the 81-82 degrees with the 240mm rad. So the bigger rad made a big difference of 15 degrees!

So the point of my reply is that you also need to take into account case design and airflow. My Area51-R2 is absolutely a bad case for optimal airflow. But I like the design so I kept it. I had to heavily modify the front of the case to fit the 360mm though.

- some cpu's run hotter than others

- check bios settings and/or intel tuning utility to configure your CPU for your need (Do you realy want to have all cores overclocked at 5Ghz all the time even when idle? That will cost you a lot in power draw costs and additional heath when you don't need it)

- make sure you have good airflow in your case (optimal airflow, not the more fans the better)

- If you want to use an AIO, a bigger rad is always better for cooling if you can fit it in your case.

 

 

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