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Old 08-12-2019, 04:05 AM
stebrick stebrick is offline
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Default H150i Pro low pump speed

The PC I'm using is my fresh build which was installed by the computer shop few days ago.

I notice from iCue and bios that the AIO H150i pump speed is always spinning between 9xx and 10xx RPM, which is unusually low according to what i've found from google. I cant even change the pump speed profile in iCue (only the fans speed of the radiaor can be changed).

In my situation, when the CPU (i9-9900k) usage is near 30% during gaming, the temperature is around 7x degree and the pump speed remains the same. It's 50 degree during non-gaming.

What's the plausible cause(s) of my pump speed issue? I am not familiar with hardware stuff so I cant diagnose the issue myself. Some help from you guys are much appreciated.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 08-12-2019, 05:19 AM
stebrick stebrick is offline
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Also, i cant do anything over the pump speed in bios or dragon centre. I'm using MSI Godlike z390 motherboard and haven't messed with any of its setting. Everything is default setting so far.
Just FYI.
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:35 AM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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The pump speed is only changeable through the iCUE software. BIOS controls have no effect on the Pro series coolers. The pump should automatically upshift if you reach a critical coolant level, although your BIOS voltage and power settings will have far more impact on the end CPU temperature.

Can you elaborate on why you can't change the speed? The cooler is not detected? Screenshot? iCUE uses the same three "presets" for pump control as the fans. However, their definition is not the same for both. For the pump Quiet=1100 rpm, Balanced=2160 rpm, and Extreme 2850 +-30 rpm. As with the fans, click the speed setting on the left first. It will highlight yellow. Then click the pump on the right. It should ring yellow to let you know it has been applied. I do not recommend the Quiet pump speed for anything more than desktop browsing and probably not at all on 8+ core CPUs. You should be able to park in on balanced and leave it. While on the subject, the fan curve presets are subjective and may work well if you room is a constant 20-23C. However, most people are better off designing their own to meet their noise level parameters. Use the + to create a new fan "cooling mode" custom curve.
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:56 AM
stebrick stebrick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
The pump speed is only changeable through the iCUE software. BIOS controls have no effect on the Pro series coolers. The pump should automatically upshift if you reach a critical coolant level, although your BIOS voltage and power settings will have far more impact on the end CPU temperature.

Can you elaborate on why you can't change the speed? The cooler is not detected? Screenshot? iCUE uses the same three "presets" for pump control as the fans. However, their definition is not the same for both. For the pump Quiet=1100 rpm, Balanced=2160 rpm, and Extreme 2850 +-30 rpm. As with the fans, click the speed setting on the left first. It will highlight yellow. Then click the pump on the right. It should ring yellow to let you know it has been applied. I do not recommend the Quiet pump speed for anything more than desktop browsing and probably not at all on 8+ core CPUs. You should be able to park in on balanced and leave it. While on the subject, the fan curve presets are subjective and may work well if you room is a constant 20-23C. However, most people are better off designing their own to meet their noise level parameters. Use the + to create a new fan "cooling mode" custom curve.
Shoot! Got it now, tyvm. I can set the pump speed at 2850 now by following your instruction. I suppose this is the max speed this pump can offer?

I must say this's kinda unintrutive setting. What I did was to click all the devices on the left panel, then click the "extreme" and edit all devices on the right. However this didn't change any setting on the pump speed at all.

I'm however more confused why the pump speed is not programmed to change with the temperature of the CPU by default. Doesn't it make more sense that way?

Now I got another question, the temperature as shown in iCue is very different from the MSI Afterburner (Proof here: https://i.imgur.com/vjtAVCz.jpg). May I know why? Which one is supposed to reflect the true temperature of CPU? From my feeling it seems afterburner is more accurate since my room is vastly hotter upon reaching 7x degree. The figure in iCue just doesn't make any sense or have any probative value. Do I have to recalibrate the sensor or something else? Actually I'm not even sure where did they put the temp sensor

Last edited by stebrick; 08-12-2019 at 12:01 PM.
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  #5  
Old 08-12-2019, 12:00 PM
stebrick stebrick is offline
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Sorry another question, is it receommended to set this pump at full speed 24/7 (or 12-15/7) if I dont mind about the noise? By doing so would it further reduce the lifespan of this cooler?
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:03 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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No, the controls are not intuitive and this is a common first misstep. The predecessor Link worked the opposite way (pick fan, apply speed) and I spent months clicking the wrong way, even though I knew better.

That number to the right of the pump picture in iCUE is the coolant temperature or "H150i Pro Temp". Coolant temperature is the minimum possible or baseline CPU temperature. If you coolant is 28C, then your CPU will also be 28C with 0v. Of course, we never have 0 volts except when powered off so the internal CPU temperature will bounce all over as voltage is applied/removed in millisecond increments.

Pump and fan speeds are based on the coolant temperature because this is the value they directly affect. Your pump/fan speeds have no impact on the heat created when voltage is applied at the pins and then through the CPU. It is only after the heat is conducted into the cooling system that pump/fan speeds have any effect. The usual example I give is person A has a small 120mm cooler attached to their CPU. They foolishly set their Vcore to 1.75v in their attempt to reach 6GHz on the clocks. They turn their PC on and... sizzle. We know what happens next. Now take person B who does the same thing, except they are using a 10m wide, 3M tall cooling panel with 14 millions fins for dissipating heat. They set up at 1.75v and... sizzle. The cooler is a waste heat removal, not heat prevention. It cannot save you from the heat created by your voltage, but it does keep it from being worse. A small cooler will in time become overwhelmed as the heat to be disposed of exceeds the capacity to remove it. Coolant temperature is the measure of this. At that point the CPU temp increases because of the higher baseline coolant temperature and the ratio is +1C coolant temp = +1C CPU temp. So in a more sustainable test, the little 120mm starts off OK, but gradually warms up into a more troublesome zone later. On the other hand 10m cooler guy is running the exact same CPU temp a week later because his capacity for dispersing the heat is so much greater that the CPU's ability to produce it. Coolant temp never rises.

All variables are not equal when it comes to CPU temp. The voltage is king and massively dominates your end value. Going from an idle ~0.70v to 1.25v likely increases your CPU temp by +35-45C. On the other hand, a large coolant temp swing on the H150i might be +8C (and some of that is an increase in case ambient). When you adjust fan and pump speed it is the coolant temp or 8C value you are attacking. Reducing that by 2C is a big gain from a percentage standpoint, but -2C coolant is still only worth -2C CPU temp. This means there is no need to go crazy trying to blast fans for a 1C change. In terms of fans and pump speed, they do what you'd expect. Fans help disperse the heat from the radiator. Faster speed, higher rate of dispersion. The pump controls the number of trips per unit of water from CPU to radiator and back. However, cycle rate is a bit tricky. A faster rate means more trips there and back, but also means slightly less time in the radiator where the heat is released. So more trips, but less heat released per trip. Now, it really isn't that simple and there are some complex relationships between fluid dynamics, pressure, and radiator design, but that is the gist of things. Now one thing that is very apparent on the Pro series with this 1100 rpm Quiet pump speed is you can drop below the minimum pressure point for smooth even flow. Everyone with a H150i and 9900K reports a significant temp penalty when using the 1100 rpm speed. 8 cores is a bit too much idle heat for that flow. However, you should be able to use the balanced speed for all purposes. It's pretty quiet for the desktop and will do the job at steady load. You can experiment with the Extreme, but most users report a 0-1C improvement and of course we are all testing with software temp readings rather than real lab equipment and tight controls, so event the 1C may be attributable elsewhere. The lifespan for these coolers is measured in hours rather than revolutions. Common sense tells you more is more and thus should wear out faster, but it is a rare day when someone pops up with a seven year old cooler and it has mechanically worn out. The attrition rate on AIO coolers is higher than I would like, but most are not physically worn out. Electrical or flow problems are much more common, so you should whatever speed you want and not worry about MTBF.

Last edited by c-attack; 08-12-2019 at 01:07 PM.
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