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  #1  
Old 08-05-2018, 11:06 PM
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Exclamation 8700k + H115i - Idling at 35C

After getting temps up in the 35C-39C, during day, I thought maybe the paste was not as good so I've changed it to arctic and it still the same thing. When I don't do anything, it literally stays at 34C-35C and I have spikes up to 50 each time I open something, refresh or even when I open task manger.

8700k + h115i. My room is very hot during the day. No AC. Around 30C during the day. I didn't really force anything or play around with it when I installed. I applied a fairly good amount of thermal paste.

In the Z370 Gigabyte BIOS, temps are always 3-5 degrees higher? Up to 38-40C ?

Thank you for any replies!



Also, can anyone tell me if the AIO is installed OK? It doesn't seem forced and it went down very easy. Although I keep looking over and it seems the tubes are too tight? Like right where they go inside, with the plastic on top, it feels to me like they might "pop" at any time? Lol sorry, this is my first time and I have no clue! All builds I've seen have the radiator on top but I didn't have space on top so I had to put it in front. Does it sit in an OK position? Thanks



(During day was really hot in my room around 30 or more, now at night it gets really cool under 25C so I'm hoping the water might stabilize a bit?)

Updated Temps (the room is now much cooler than it was during the day):

Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1.JPG (2.76 MB, 164 views)

Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 12:32 AM. Reason: Added screenshots.
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Old 08-05-2018, 11:10 PM
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Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 12:33 AM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:14 AM
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Technically, the cooler can only cool down to the same temp as the coolant inside the radiator. The coolant will never be lower than the ambient temp. Thus, if you check the H115 cooler temps, it should read somewhere upward of 30C (since your ambient is 30C and the cooler is doing it's job transferring heat from the CPU to the coolant). 35C idle given that environment seems perfectly reasonable. 50C on demand is also not beyond expectations, depending on your configuration, whether you are overclocking, what services you have running in the background, etc...
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:19 AM
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The only thing I did in BIOS was setting my ram speed to 3000Mhz. Other than that, no OC. And I don't plan on doing so. Thank you for your reply. After sitting here on Mozilla/desktop and idling, it seems to me the temps stabilized and your post makes sense.

I'm good to go I guess? Also, can you take a look at the position of the cooler? Like the tubes near the CPU? Are they ok in the position they are? They never were forced, it went down very easy.

Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 12:28 AM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:31 AM
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The install instructions would have it reversed ... with the tubes towards the RAM. That way, in most cases, the Corsair logo isn't upside-down.

But from a performance perspective, it doesn't matter. That's just aesthetics.
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Old 08-06-2018, 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by DevBiker View Post
The install instructions would have it reversed ... with the tubes towards the RAM. That way, in most cases, the Corsair logo isn't upside-down.

But from a performance perspective, it doesn't matter. That's just aesthetics.
I never realized it was upside down until now... as long as it doesn't affect performance. (but at the same time, I don't have a choice?)

After navigating this particular forum, Mozilla opened, nothing major in the background, just normal browsing, watching youtube videos.. temps go up to 37-40C. Is this normal? Even though my room is cooler now? Also the spikes each time I open something ?

Thanks

Front panel ON


Edit: Also, how would I know if the cooler is making contact to the CPU fully? I tried to screw in all the way and not too much. It feels very sturdy.


I've came to the realization that without the front panel, the water temp drops down a few degrees:
Front panel OFF



However, with the panel on, it gets hotter since the fans are blowing outside and I'm assuming the heat builds up in that small space in front?

How can I solve this issue giving the fact that the case is a very tight fit on the top and the only solution I have is to mount it in front? I don't want to leave the panel off in order to get cooler temps... (i know, maybe i made the mistake of buying this case..)

Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 01:21 AM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:04 AM
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As mentioned above, you can't have idle core temps lower than the coolant temp, which in turn can't be lower than your case (room) temperature. The case is always going to be warmer than the room. It's a small box with a bunch of metal pieces with current running through them. Tends to be warmer in there. More seriously, having a coolant temp of only 32C (the value on the right side of the pump) is pretty good for your room temp and suggests your case is not overly adding to your temperatures.

As for the front panel, it is not likely heat is being trapped in front since it won't pick it up until the exhaust side. This can be more of an issue when the radiator/fans are positioned for exhaust. Any difference in coolant temperature will be down to airflow and it is near certain the front panel poses more of a restriction than the open air environment. Does it matter? Probably not. Don't compare CPU temps with it on. 8700K is is far to dynamic and the OS and its own instructions extremely variable. Compare the coolant temp with and without the front panel to the room temp. (On- room temp 27/coolant 31, Off - room temp 27/coolant 30, etc). Keep in mind coolant temperature is additive to CPU temps, but this also means if you reduce the coolant temperature by 1C, you have only reduced your CPU temp by 1C. For the most part, this is small change and not worth the stress and probably not worth taking the front panel off.

I do have two suggestions. First, set your pump speed to balanced. In a 30C room you must have a fan or two running to keep you cool. You will never hear the difference between Quiet and Balanced in those conditions. It hard enough in quiet room, let alone a Summertime room environment. In my usage on the same CPU and cooler, I do see a 1-2C difference in coolant temp at idle between the very low 1100 rpm quiet speed and 2100 balanced. There most certainly is a difference at load and I would not use Quiet for that. Since the pump is not automatically adjustable to load, needing to change it back in forth from Quiet to Balanced and back between usages is a needless task. Set it to Balanced and be done.

Another thing to consider is fan speed. Nothing wrong with 400-500 at idle at the desktop and you won't see a meaningful change by increasing it. However, it looks like the front rail is your only intake source of air, so when you are under sustained load conditions with high GPU activity (gaming, rendering, etc.), you are going to want to facilitate some air exchange in the case. If you are overly conservative on the front intake fan speed, it may affect overall case temperatures which in turn affects everything. That is something you can tune over time and not directly related to your initial set-up.

Find a tuning/overclock guide specifically for Gigabyte Z370. I see where you noted you don't intend to overclock and that's fine. However, all Z370/8700K CPUs need some tweaking right out of the box - or rather the BIOS usually does. I don't know the GA equivalents, but Asus has features enabled by default that alter the multiplier across all cores while skewing the voltage table. This results in very heavy and unnecessary Vcore levels in the stock/default configuration. There is also an IA/DC load line calibration setting to reduce some of the voltage swings. The behavior you describe of popping up to 50C when opening a browser, etc. is completely normal on Coffee Lake CPUs, but you can soften the reactions.

You don't have a contact issue between cold plate and CPU. If you did, your idle temps would be higher and the spikes on program launch would be hitting the 70-90C range, rather than the very normal 50C. Even with a delid, I will still see spikes close to that on piggy programs like iTunes or poorly optimized games. That is how these newer generation CPUs operate.

Last edited by c-attack; 08-06-2018 at 07:07 AM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
As mentioned above, you can't have idle core temps lower than the coolant temp, which in turn can't be lower than your case (room) temperature. The case is always going to be warmer than the room. It's a small box with a bunch of metal pieces with current running through them. Tends to be warmer in there. More seriously, having a coolant temp of only 32C (the value on the right side of the pump) is pretty good for your room temp and suggests your case is not overly adding to your temperatures.

As for the front panel, it is not likely heat is being trapped in front since it won't pick it up until the exhaust side. This can be more of an issue when the radiator/fans are positioned for exhaust. Any difference in coolant temperature will be down to airflow and it is near certain the front panel poses more of a restriction than the open air environment. Does it matter? Probably not. Don't compare CPU temps with it on. 8700K is is far to dynamic and the OS and its own instructions extremely variable. Compare the coolant temp with and without the front panel to the room temp. (On- room temp 27/coolant 31, Off - room temp 27/coolant 30, etc). Keep in mind coolant temperature is additive to CPU temps, but this also means if you reduce the coolant temperature by 1C, you have only reduced your CPU temp by 1C. For the most part, this is small change and not worth the stress and probably not worth taking the front panel off.

I do have two suggestions. First, set your pump speed to balanced. In a 30C room you must have a fan or two running to keep you cool. You will never hear the difference between Quiet and Balanced in those conditions. It hard enough in quiet room, let alone a Summertime room environment. In my usage on the same CPU and cooler, I do see a 1-2C difference in coolant temp at idle between the very low 1100 rpm quiet speed and 2100 balanced. There most certainly is a difference at load and I would not use Quiet for that. Since the pump is not automatically adjustable to load, needing to change it back in forth from Quiet to Balanced and back between usages is a needless task. Set it to Balanced and be done.

Another thing to consider is fan speed. Nothing wrong with 400-500 at idle at the desktop and you won't see a meaningful change by increasing it. However, it looks like the front rail is your only intake source of air, so when you are under sustained load conditions with high GPU activity (gaming, rendering, etc.), you are going to want to facilitate some air exchange in the case. If you are overly conservative on the front intake fan speed, it may affect overall case temperatures which in turn affects everything. That is something you can tune over time and not directly related to your initial set-up.

Find a tuning/overclock guide specifically for Gigabyte Z370. I see where you noted you don't intend to overclock and that's fine. However, all Z370/8700K CPUs need some tweaking right out of the box - or rather the BIOS usually does. I don't know the GA equivalents, but Asus has features enabled by default that alter the multiplier across all cores while skewing the voltage table. This results in very heavy and unnecessary Vcore levels in the stock/default configuration. There is also an IA/DC load line calibration setting to reduce some of the voltage swings. The behavior you describe of popping up to 50C when opening a browser, etc. is completely normal on Coffee Lake CPUs, but you can soften the reactions.

You don't have a contact issue between cold plate and CPU. If you did, your idle temps would be higher and the spikes on program launch would be hitting the 70-90C range, rather than the very normal 50C. Even with a delid, I will still see spikes close to that on piggy programs like iTunes or poorly optimized games. That is how these newer generation CPUs operate.
Thanks for the long reply. It makes sense to me now.

When I booted my PC today, here are the temps:



I guess my room is at fault.

The only thing I changed was ram to its full 3000Mhz. It's hard to find any guides for Z370 that are not full OC.

Can you point me in any direction? I was trying to find yesterday how to change the voltage manually so it won't spike ( although I look into CoreTemp's VID and that ones spikes around and everyone says it's not the one to look at )

What exactly can I do to my Z370 and 8700k?(minimal stuff since I'm a beginner)
Thank you for your time.
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Old 08-06-2018, 04:55 PM
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Room temperature often is the heaviest influence in a temperate climate. There is absolutely nothing I could ever do to take 10C off my end temps, except wait for it to snow.

Setting a specific voltage (either adaptive or manual) is a very good idea, if not required for most everyone regardless of intentions. Unfortunately, most of this stuff is brand specific in location and terminology, although often it exists across the spectrum. Asus has a 'default CPU behavior' selector that alters how aggressively you slide up and down the VID scale. GA may have something similar. All of the boards have some kind of feature that defaults to all cores running the Intel specified, single core turbo frequency (4.7GHz or 4700 MHz). Looks like GA is a more reasonable 6 core x 100% = 4400. Generally there is nothing wrong with using these features, as long you take back control over the voltage. Your shots above suggest your peak VID is 1.277 volts, which might reach 1.30v with normal overshoot and a moderate Load Line Calibration setting. Your temps actually look quite good for a 30C base temp, but I use 1.305 volts as my peak loaded overshoot value at 5.0GHz, so it would be surprising if you can't run a lower fixed or adaptive Vcore for 4.4GHz.

Start with these two. I have not read through it all, but it is generally a good place to see what people are doing and most are going to have the same kinds of questions (what does this function do, Vcore, LLC settings, etc.).

From Gigabyte originally: https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-in...-oc-guide.html

Usual owners' thread: https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-in...-settings.html

You don't have to do all the things these people are doing (or any of them), but there is information in there, especially when it comes to finding a target Vcore voltage or LLC setting. Unless you are having high temps issues, I don't see a reason to do much of anything at 4.4GHz other than set a specific manual or adaptive voltage. Adaptive voltage may have 1 or 2 other needed tweaks to keep it in check.
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Old 08-06-2018, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Room temperature often is the heaviest influence in a temperate climate. There is absolutely nothing I could ever do to take 10C off my end temps, except wait for it to snow.

Setting a specific voltage (either adaptive or manual) is a very good idea, if not required for most everyone regardless of intentions. Unfortunately, most of this stuff is brand specific in location and terminology, although often it exists across the spectrum. Asus has a 'default CPU behavior' selector that alters how aggressively you slide up and down the VID scale. GA may have something similar. All of the boards have some kind of feature that defaults to all cores running the Intel specified, single core turbo frequency (4.7GHz or 4700 MHz). Looks like GA is a more reasonable 6 core x 100% = 4400. Generally there is nothing wrong with using these features, as long you take back control over the voltage. Your shots above suggest your peak VID is 1.277 volts, which might reach 1.30v with normal overshoot and a moderate Load Line Calibration setting. Your temps actually look quite good for a 30C base temp, but I use 1.305 volts as my peak loaded overshoot value at 5.0GHz, so it would be surprising if you can't run a lower fixed or adaptive Vcore for 4.4GHz.

Start with these two. I have not read through it all, but it is generally a good place to see what people are doing and most are going to have the same kinds of questions (what does this function do, Vcore, LLC settings, etc.).

From Gigabyte originally: https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-in...-oc-guide.html

Usual owners' thread: https://www.overclock.net/forum/6-in...-settings.html

You don't have to do all the things these people are doing (or any of them), but there is information in there, especially when it comes to finding a target Vcore voltage or LLC setting. Unless you are having high temps issues, I don't see a reason to do much of anything at 4.4GHz other than set a specific manual or adaptive voltage. Adaptive voltage may have 1 or 2 other needed tweaks to keep it in check.
Thank you again.

Here's what I've done.

1. X.M.P Profile 1
2. CPU Clock Ratio to 45
3. Disabled Speed Shift, C1E, C3, C6/C7/C8/C10
4. CPU Uncore to 40, Disabled VT-d, Internal Graphics
5. LLC set to Auto
6. CPU Core Voltage set to 1.280v

Here's a short video of my system running on idle. I still think temps are A LITTLE bit high, especially, when i'm browsing this forum. Even as I am typing this, the teps have risen to 37-40C.

What advice can you give me from the information I provided to you?




EDIT: Also I've noticed the coolant temp never go above 34C which I'm happy about, otherwise it would mean I've got a bad cooler? The only time they go above 34C is when I put the front panel on, it is VERY hot in my room, i'm in a small room and the sun shines right through the windows. With the front panel on, coolant temps go up 2-3C. With the front panel off, they go down 2-3C.
|
The only time the temps seem to stabilize in the 34-36C area, is when I don't do anything. The minute I do stuff, they go up. Again, as I'm typing this, CoreTemp is playing around 36C-41C.

Thanks

Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 06:58 PM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:24 PM
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I typically only get about a +4C rise in coolant temperature as well (adjusting for any case temp rise). So if you started at 30C coolant temp and it is 34C now, the most you can possibly reduce the coolant/CPU temp is by 4C. Of course, nothing is 100% efficient and you will not be able to remove all heat when under load at any fan speed. What that means is you can probably relax your fans a little. I am running more aggressively than you and never use anything more than 900 rpm when at load. I could use even less with only a 1C penalty, but I also need to move exhaust air through the radiator as well for overall airflow balance.

Keep in mind most of the people who participate heavily in the above referenced threads have a specific bend toward overclocking/benchmarking and not necessarily every day practical use.

1) There is nothing wrong with using XMP. Go ahead. It should not affect anything on the CPU side much, unless the specific frequency in question forces a change to the 125 MHz strap. I don't hear much about that on Z370. Very doubtful. Proceed.

2) You can set your multiplier to whatever you want, including leaving it at 44. 45 is fine as well and there should be little difference in terms of required voltage.

3) Now we are into benchmark territory. SpeedShift and C-states (C1E, C3, C6, etc) are all power saving features. If you really want to try and make your core temps the same as the coolant temp at idle, this is the only way to do it. Enable them all and it will try and cut the voltage down to 0. Zero voltage, CPU same temp as the coolant. However, I would suggest you pass on that goal. It has no bearing whatsoever on CPU life and a very nominal difference in baseline power saving. People with laptops or user who leave their PC on 24/7 as a server can take a different approach. If you are using adaptive voltage, that is about all the power saving at idle you need. C1E will likely affect gaming without setting the OS level power settings to a higher state to prevent C-state phasing while playing. You can set C-states to Auto (or off) on adaptive. I would probably make use of them if I were running manual voltage and then change the power setting in the Windows OS when running benchmarks, playing games, etc.

Speed Shift is a bit trickier. It is new and we don't know a lot about it because it is too hard to observe at an operational level. There is still only 1 or 2 articles out there where people attempt to test it. For all intents and purposes, it appears to be a win-win for most scenarios. I don't see a reason to turn it off. If changes power levels at the P-state, above the operating system level and this happens so fast, no monitoring program is going to be able to catch it. People who turn it off generally fall into one of two categories - 1) don't like the perceived "pinging" of the cores. This makes it look like the CPU is always doing something. This does take some getting used to when moving from older processors that flatlined at idle. 2) The benchmark crowd who turn off everything.

4) All fine. I set my maximum uncore/ring frequency to a specific number as well.

5) Probably fine for your level. How the LLC behaves at each one is very brand/board specific. I would have to have a GA Z370 to say more.

6) I feel like this is more than you need for 4.5 GHz. However, as always this is an individual CPU character trait. The only way to know is to drop your Vcore 0.02 at a time while maintaining all other settings as they are. Leave it for a week. Did you crash/freeze/BSOD? No? Drop down 0.02 again until you do. Then go back up a rung. That part can be stressful for those not used to the machine resetting this way. If that does bother you, leave it where it is, unless peak core temps become a problem. At that level, you are not wearing your processor out faster. You just might see slightly higher peak temps. Should do little for idle temps.

The peaky/spiky behavior when mucking around on the desktop you will need to get used to. This is how the CPU was designed to work. Maximum power for simple tasks to make things snappy. We first saw this on Skylake, then Kaby, and now Coffee. Each generation new users often have a startled reaction to behavior, particularly compared to the docile and well behaved CPUs of the Sandy Bridge era. It can be difficult as well since we used to attribute that kind of peaky temps to a contact problem. Now it's by design.
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
I typically only get about a +4C rise in coolant temperature as well (adjusting for any case temp rise). So if you started at 30C coolant temp and it is 34C now, the most you can possibly reduce the coolant/CPU temp is by 4C. Of course, nothing is 100% efficient and you will not be able to remove all heat when under load at any fan speed. What that means is you can probably relax your fans a little. I am running more aggressively than you and never use anything more than 900 rpm when at load. I could use even less with only a 1C penalty, but I also need to move exhaust air through the radiator as well for overall airflow balance.

Keep in mind most of the people who participate heavily in the above referenced threads have a specific bend toward overclocking/benchmarking and not necessarily every day practical use.

1) There is nothing wrong with using XMP. Go ahead. It should not affect anything on the CPU side much, unless the specific frequency in question forces a change to the 125 MHz strap. I don't hear much about that on Z370. Very doubtful. Proceed.

2) You can set your multiplier to whatever you want, including leaving it at 44. 45 is fine as well and there should be little difference in terms of required voltage.

3) Now we are into benchmark territory. SpeedShift and C-states (C1E, C3, C6, etc) are all power saving features. If you really want to try and make your core temps the same as the coolant temp at idle, this is the only way to do it. Enable them all and it will try and cut the voltage down to 0. Zero voltage, CPU same temp as the coolant. However, I would suggest you pass on that goal. It has no bearing whatsoever on CPU life and a very nominal difference in baseline power saving. People with laptops or user who leave their PC on 24/7 as a server can take a different approach. If you are using adaptive voltage, that is about all the power saving at idle you need. C1E will likely affect gaming without setting the OS level power settings to a higher state to prevent C-state phasing while playing. You can set C-states to Auto (or off) on adaptive. I would probably make use of them if I were running manual voltage and then change the power setting in the Windows OS when running benchmarks, playing games, etc.

Speed Shift is a bit trickier. It is new and we don't know a lot about it because it is too hard to observe at an operational level. There is still only 1 or 2 articles out there where people attempt to test it. For all intents and purposes, it appears to be a win-win for most scenarios. I don't see a reason to turn it off. If changes power levels at the P-state, above the operating system level and this happens so fast, no monitoring program is going to be able to catch it. People who turn it off generally fall into one of two categories - 1) don't like the perceived "pinging" of the cores. This makes it look like the CPU is always doing something. This does take some getting used to when moving from older processors that flatlined at idle. 2) The benchmark crowd who turn off everything.

4) All fine. I set my maximum uncore/ring frequency to a specific number as well.

5) Probably fine for your level. How the LLC behaves at each one is very brand/board specific. I would have to have a GA Z370 to say more.

6) I feel like this is more than you need for 4.5 GHz. However, as always this is an individual CPU character trait. The only way to know is to drop your Vcore 0.02 at a time while maintaining all other settings as they are. Leave it for a week. Did you crash/freeze/BSOD? No? Drop down 0.02 again until you do. Then go back up a rung. That part can be stressful for those not used to the machine resetting this way. If that does bother you, leave it where it is, unless peak core temps become a problem. At that level, you are not wearing your processor out faster. You just might see slightly higher peak temps. Should do little for idle temps.

The peaky/spiky behavior when mucking around on the desktop you will need to get used to. This is how the CPU was designed to work. Maximum power for simple tasks to make things snappy. We first saw this on Skylake, then Kaby, and now Coffee. Each generation new users often have a startled reaction to behavior, particularly compared to the docile and well behaved CPUs of the Sandy Bridge era. It can be difficult as well since we used to attribute that kind of peaky temps to a contact problem. Now it's by design.
You answered all my questions. The only issue at this point I see is my room temp. It is very very hot and I live in an apt with no AC (WA state) and it's usually hot in the summer but later on it is very cold so I'm hoping my room temp will drop significantly when fall hits.

Everything makes sense now, given the fact that room is about 28-32C, coolant around 32C-34C and CPU 35C-40C. I guess it makes PERFECT sense.

Thanks again for your input. It is very well detailed and informed.

One last question, when I change Power mode in Win 10 to HIGH Performance, the CPU in coretemp is at its full speed or stock speed.. Can I run my Win10 on High performance all the time, even when I'm watching videos on YouTube?

Will that affect the CPU in anyway?

And if I understand correctly, you are saying I could, turn on high performance and set C1E to auto or just Enable it?

EDIT: Would I even get any benefits to high performance over balanced performance?

EDIT2: And no, I have never frooze my bios/No bluescreen/Nothing like that. I just don't want to mess something up.. it took me a while to save money and buy all this stuff and I wouldn't want to mess something up. I will just leave everything as is.

Last edited by arflyy; 08-06-2018 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by arflyy View Post
One last question, when I change Power mode in Win 10 to HIGH Performance, the CPU in coretemp is at its full speed or stock speed.. Can I run my Win10 on High performance all the time, even when I'm watching videos on YouTube?

And if I understand correctly, you are saying I could, turn on high performance and set C1E to auto or just Enable it?
Yes, that is precisely how you overcome C1E and the other states when they are active. While I might use the default "High performance" setting with 100% minimum up time for gaming (especially some odd 1-2 core CPU bottlenecked games), I don't see any reason to use for desktop stuff or videos. You don't need 6 cores at 100% for watching videos. Toggle back down to performance when at the desktop.

Actually, what I normally recommend is making a cross between the Balanced and High performance mode. There are multiple hidden settings and behaviors you cannot access through the Windows settings (probably power shell). What you can do is "create a new power plan" and select High performance as the base. Then go into Advanced Power Settings -> Processor Power Management (+) -> Minimum processor state -> change from 100% to 5%. This will allow your clocks to relax on the desktop at idle, but retain the aggressive power settings hidden from view and you don't need to switch back and forth. In theory, it will use more CPU resources and thus produce more heat and therefore CPU core temps should be slightly higher. However, you probably would need side by side line graphs to see it. 1-2C at idle is not important.



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Originally Posted by arflyy View Post
Will that affect the CPU in anyway?
Running High performance with 100% up time will increase your idle CPU temps. The frequency will stay pegged at the maximum and the voltage will stay elevated to match. Only people running real time transaction type machines need to worry about this. Coffee Lake is plenty responsive in the standard balanced power state. I can't think of a good reason to do this.




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Originally Posted by arflyy View Post
EDIT: Would I even get any benefits to high performance over balanced performance?
Only with C1E enabled. I have found this processor to be pretty good at keeping clocks up in games when they are needed. However, I just finished testing this earlier in the Summer. Even in an extreme CPU usage game like Watch Dogs 2 (70-90% CPU usage), C1E was kicking in when enabled and causing tiny little stutters. Either the full High performance or my hybrid version of it stopped that immediately. I have done a full workout on all these power saving modes twice now on this CPU. My takeaway is you should only bother with C1E and higher C-states if you are running manual voltage or leave the PC on 24/7 (higher c-states). For the standard adaptive, you are going to save 10W at idle versus manual voltage and C1E will not reduce the minimum wattage further. From a power saving point of view, if you want to cut down the wattage, put it to sleep or turn it off. Can't beat 0-2W. For most games, there is no difference between frequency up time on the Balanced and Performance Power plan. However, there are always a few odd programs that do require it. The 'hybrid' of High Performance should take care of that as well.

Last edited by c-attack; 08-06-2018 at 09:00 PM.
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  #14  
Old 08-06-2018, 09:02 PM
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Thank you for all your detailed answers.
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Old 08-07-2018, 12:48 AM
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Just wanted to give an updated for anyone else reading this.

My problem wasn't in the cooler, nor in the fans, nor in the thermal paste.

My only problem is my ROOM TEMP. The H115i works as intended and I couldn't be happier. The iCue is ver lovely as well. Never had issues.

My solution, that works for me, is this: I mounted the radiator in front of the case with the fans OUTSIDE the case blowing INSIDE the case. I saw improvements of about 2-4C.(to the coolant)

Furthermore, my specific case, Phantek P400S, SUCKS when it comes to AIO, especially the H115i. It is very tight and the airflow is not good if you want to get the best temps for your CPU.

During day, my coolant can reach up to 34-35C just because my room is VERY HOT. I have no AC. However, at night, coolant temperatures go down, really down! I am impressed with this cooler.. for anyone having issues with temps, first make sure your room isn't 100+ degrees and make sure you get the BEST airflow possible in your case.

Below are my current temps. @ 10PM, it is chilly outside (August 6th, 2018, Seattle), temps are in the 30C.





I am very pleased with this. If you have an AC, freeze the ***** out of your room for the lowest possible temps.
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