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Old 07-25-2019, 10:26 AM
senatorsack senatorsack is offline
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Default Case fan curve settings with H100i Platinum

I just recently installed the H100i Platinum AIO cooler and had a question on how to configure the fan curves for my remaining case fans in iCue.

My build has 6x LL120 fans on the Obsidian 500D RGB case (2 fans pushing air over radiator on the top, 3 fans as intake in the front, and 1 exhaust fan in the back).

When I was air-cooling my CPU, I set my fan RPMs based on the Intel Core Package temps in iCue. Since 2 of my fans are controlled via the H100i now, do I keep my other 4 fan curves based on Core Package, or do I change it to pump temperature?

This is my first time working with an AIO cooler so I'm a novice when it comes to figuring out the fan optimization.
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  #2  
Old 07-25-2019, 11:08 AM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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Get off the CPU core/package temps. Your case fans will do nothing to keep the underside of your CPU cool or increase the thermal conductivity through the cold plate. Your case fans do regulate the in/out air exchange for the case and the radiator fans are part of that as well with case ambient temperature changes the end result. If you want to see what CPU temp regulation looks like, try the any of the three presets (Quiet/Balanced/Extreme) for the case fans. I can't stand it and it is essentially not viable for any CPU after Haswell.

There are two easy choices for most people:

1) Custom curve. Click the + in the performance tab. Use the coolant temp (H100i Platinum Temp) as the sensor control variable in the Commander Pro tab in iCUE. Your goal is here to create some sort of balance between the intake volume of the front 3 vs the exhaust capability of the top/rear 3. The radiator will cut your airflow potential in half, so think of that as "1 fan" in terms of balancing. No matter what, this does not need to be exact by any means, but if the coolant temp is climbing either you have CPU load or the case is getting warmer. This covers both. Makes sense for people with predominately CPU heavy loads or multi-radiator set-ups.

2) GPU temp - This is the clear and obvious choice for the rear fan, but the front 3 can be set for this as well. Depending on how much heat your GPU shoots around (or your usage) it may be preferable to try and push as much GPU heat toward the back of the case and minimize the amount sucked through the radiator out the top. This is my preferred one with open air GPUs and is probably essential for multi-GPU builds. The cooler does its thing. The front and back deal with the GPU, by far the biggest heat source in the case.

**Note the Commander Pro cannot access either of these data sets when the software is not running. If you spend a lot of time with it closed for other programs or just hate the fan blast on boot, there is another recommendation. The T-sensors that came with the Commander Pro (in the box hopefully) are native to the device and do not require the software to be active, thus they fans stay in control at boot as well. To mimic coolant temp on the CPU radiator, run a sensor to the exhaust side up above. Exhaust temp is usually within 1-2C of coolant temp and will stay at that fixed offset making it very reliable. For the GPU temp, you either stick it above the back of the GPU by the outputs in back OR tape it to the back of the rear fan to measure true rear exhaust temp. Obviously this will not be the exactly the same as GPU temp, but as long as you have a decent range of temperature change, it is an effective control variable. You will need to learn the range for each placement, but once you do it is effective and consistent.
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Old 07-25-2019, 11:36 AM
senatorsack senatorsack is offline
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2) GPU temp - This is the clear and obvious choice for the rear fan, but the front 3 can be set for this as well. Depending on how much heat your GPU shoots around (or your usage) it may be preferable to try and push as much GPU heat toward the back of the case and minimize the amount sucked through the radiator out the top. This is my preferred one with open air GPUs and is probably essential for multi-GPU builds. The cooler does its thing. The front and back deal with the GPU, by far the biggest heat source in the case.
Thanks for your response. I think I should probably go the GPU temp route as I have a 2080Ti and I think that's going to get way hotter than my i7-8700. Do you have any advice on what the best curves would be for the GPU temp? Should the 3 intake fans have the same curve as the exhaust fan?

I'd prefer a mix of performance/noise control but I don't really know how to build that as a well-rounded curve.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:26 PM
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Should the 3 intake fans have the same curve as the exhaust fan?
Probably not. Generally speaking for a standard front (in), top/rear (out) airflow the rear fan is going to run the fastest trying to move the GPU heat out. Also, in terms of balance it is essentially 3 v 2 on intake/exhaust, so the front three (which will sound louder anyway) can go a bit slower. You can set infinite fan curves in iCUE, so there is no reason to make them run on the same one.

It would be nice if you could bump up your case fans by 200 rpm and the temp dropped 5C. Never going to happen. Changes are slow and you really can't eliminate heat. You can keep them too slow and then the heat starts to pile on. There is no specific rpm required for the job. Always go to your noise tolerance level or until you get into thermal issues. 120mm fans are very weak below 750 rpm. They start to become considerably more effective at 1000 rpm. Most people will find them loud at 1500 rpm. You can probably find some happy ground in between.
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Old 07-25-2019, 01:17 PM
senatorsack senatorsack is offline
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Thanks a ton for your help! One final question - I have a custom curve set up for my GPU fans, would it make sense for my case fans to have a similar curve to the GPU? I kind of want a baseline to go off of so I'm not totally in the dark.

I was thinking of having the front fans mirror the same temperature cutoffs but at lower RPMs and have the exhaust fan in the back do the same but with higher RPMs.
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  #6  
Old 07-25-2019, 01:25 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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No, let your GPU fans do their own thing. They have a separate job and only they can cool your GPU components. If your GPU temp is climbing those fans must respond. The case fans can not reduce GPU temp, but do keep it from being worse by moving the radiated heat elsewhere. GPU fans also tend to be shrill, so they have their own noise vs performance analysis.
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