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  #1  
Old 12-17-2018, 03:44 PM
DariusuiraD DariusuiraD is offline
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Default corsair hydro h60 temps

Hello,
so first time i have water cooling system and temps when i just browse internet or stuff is around 40c but when i play games temps go up to 60/70c especially on BF V temps looks high 70-75c so i just wonder is this normal temps or something I should check, pc specs: ryzen 2700x; rtx 2070; asus rog strix b450 e;
I read some threads about AIO pump speed n stuff I checked in bios mine is running at 4299RPM, AIO_PUMP control disabled, CPU Q FAN Control DC Mode, is these setting right?
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Old 12-17-2018, 04:35 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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Yes, your settings and that pump speed are correct. Without a coolant temperature reading, it’s a little more difficult to assess what’s going on inside, but you can approximate. We need to be able to differentiate a cooler problem from a contact issue. If there is a cooler problem, the cpu temp will continue to gradually increase from the moment you boot up - even when sitting at the desktop. They may start off ok, but inevitably they reach higher levels.

If you cold boot up in the morning and the temps are instantly high before you can get to the bios screen or is the temperature is unusually spiky or erratic, that would suggest their is a contact problem between the CPU and cold plate.
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Old 12-17-2018, 04:47 PM
DariusuiraD DariusuiraD is offline
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my temps looks like this while i play path of exile, is this too spiky?
https://imgur.com/a/zBO7Y2X
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Old 12-17-2018, 05:02 PM
DariusuiraD DariusuiraD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
Yes, your settings and that pump speed are correct. Without a coolant temperature reading, it’s a little more difficult to assess what’s going on inside, but you can approximate. We need to be able to differentiate a cooler problem from a contact issue. If there is a cooler problem, the cpu temp will continue to gradually increase from the moment you boot up - even when sitting at the desktop. They may start off ok, but inevitably they reach higher levels.

If you cold boot up in the morning and the temps are instantly high before you can get to the bios screen or is the temperature is unusually spiky or erratic, that would suggest their is a contact problem between the CPU and cold plate.
what should i dot if i have problem between the CPU and cold plate?
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Old 12-17-2018, 05:35 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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You don't have a contact problem. The CPU temps in game would very high and you would see it at the desktop as well. Your gaming line looks pretty normal and games in general have cycling CPU use so that makes it not the best indicator. However, I think you should approach it from a different perspective.

Your environment and case temps will have a measured and additive effect on CPU temp. If the case temperature goes up +10C, then so does the coolant and CPU. If you can boot your PC up in the morning (or whenever) and CPU temps stay at low levels through browsing, mail, watching videos, music, general productivity programs, etc., then there is no cooler problem. The failing cooler will slowly climb from that starting value of 25-35C and keep going, ticking up several degrees every few minutes. Eventually, you wind up having 50C minimum temps on the desktop. On the other hand, if this only happens during gaming, you are probably looking at the results of increased case temperature. This can be mistaken for bad cooler function, particularly if the entire case is slow to cool down after. That is something we can talk about, but it would be better to first figure out if this is a real cooler issue or not. If the CPU temp hasn't climbed to higher levels in 20-30 minutes on the desktop, it's not going to and this is not a cooler issue.
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Old 12-18-2018, 07:34 AM
DariusuiraD DariusuiraD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c-attack View Post
You don't have a contact problem. The CPU temps in game would very high and you would see it at the desktop as well. Your gaming line looks pretty normal and games in general have cycling CPU use so that makes it not the best indicator. However, I think you should approach it from a different perspective.

Your environment and case temps will have a measured and additive effect on CPU temp. If the case temperature goes up +10C, then so does the coolant and CPU. If you can boot your PC up in the morning (or whenever) and CPU temps stay at low levels through browsing, mail, watching videos, music, general productivity programs, etc., then there is no cooler problem. The failing cooler will slowly climb from that starting value of 25-35C and keep going, ticking up several degrees every few minutes. Eventually, you wind up having 50C minimum temps on the desktop. On the other hand, if this only happens during gaming, you are probably looking at the results of increased case temperature. This can be mistaken for bad cooler function, particularly if the entire case is slow to cool down after. That is something we can talk about, but it would be better to first figure out if this is a real cooler issue or not. If the CPU temp hasn't climbed to higher levels in 20-30 minutes on the desktop, it's not going to and this is not a cooler issue.
So the temps climbed to 36-44c in 30min on desktop by browsing n watching videos, I read another forums and people with h60 getting similar results so I guess its ok, but should I worry when it runs 60-75c while gaming or its normal and nothing to worry about? Also I read that h60 might be kinda weak for ryzen 2700x and would be better to have something with 240mm rad, like h110i or better, but would it make a lot of difference?
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  #7  
Old 12-18-2018, 05:56 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
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No, it seems like normal case temp variance and I don't think there is a cooler issue. As for solutions, where is the H60 located right now? Rear exhaust? Or somewhere else?

Yes, a 240mm radiator is double the surface area and will offer reduced coolant temperatures. However, even a single panel 120mm was enough to cool my 350W Titan X, so rather than the wattage being too much on your CPU, I wonder if the above placement is playing a large part. The real advantage to going with larger coolers (especially 280mm and 360mm sizes) is fan speed becomes unnecessary to get the job done. With a 120mm single, you many need to run the fan(s) pretty good. 240mm? Moderate. 280mm? I can let them spin at 600-700 all day long and it won't cost me more than 1C. Lets see what case and space you have to work with and where the H60 is now and we can try and give you a reasonable expectation of any gains.
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