The Corsair User Forums  

Go Back   The Corsair User Forums > Corsair Product Discussion > Power Supplies

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-18-2019, 08:42 AM
RodrigoDRT RodrigoDRT is offline
Registered User
RodrigoDRT's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 59
POST ID # = 1011683
RodrigoDRT Reputation: 10
Default Rm850x vs Rm850i

Just to be sure, afaik, the only difference is that the i one has the icue/c-link? monitoring thing? but is it really just for monitoring? any adjustements?

thats it about them? cause if so, i found them for the same price, and by logic the i one would be better if everything else is the very same, for obvious reasons.
Reply With Quote


  #2  
Old 07-19-2019, 04:01 AM
corsican corsican is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 54
POST ID # = 1011763
corsican Reputation: 10
Default

nope the fan on the RMi series is a true FDB (fluid dynamic bearing) fan and the one on the RMx series is only rifle-bearing fan (shorter lifespan which is why it's set to 0db mode to preserve life cause you can't afford to have a rifle-bearing fan spinning all the time)
Reply With Quote


  #3  
Old 07-19-2019, 06:23 AM
Krokarn Krokarn is offline
Registered User
Krokarn's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Sweden
Posts: 207
POST ID # = 1011770
Krokarn Reputation: 10
Default

RMi series can be switched between Single och Multi Rail OCP, that can not be done on the RMx series.
Reply With Quote


  #4  
Old 07-19-2019, 07:30 AM
RodrigoDRT RodrigoDRT is offline
Registered User
RodrigoDRT's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 59
POST ID # = 1011774
RodrigoDRT Reputation: 10
Default

what exactly does single/multi rail ocp does? ive no clue.
Reply With Quote


  #5  
Old 07-19-2019, 08:32 AM
DevBiker's Avatar
DevBiker DevBiker is offline
CORSAIR Beta Team
DevBiker's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 7,367
POST ID # = 1011777
DevBiker Reputation: 88
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodrigoDRT View Post
what exactly does single/multi rail ocp does? ive no clue.
http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/show...f-the-12V-rail
__________________
Please click "Edit System Specs" and fill out your system info.

This comment is provided "as-is", without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the sanity or mental fitness of the author. The author is not a Corsair employee, does not represent Corsair, and no comment should be construed as an official statement from Corsair.

Reply With Quote


  #6  
Old 07-19-2019, 09:37 AM
RodrigoDRT RodrigoDRT is offline
Registered User
RodrigoDRT's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 59
POST ID # = 1011789
RodrigoDRT Reputation: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DevBiker View Post
unfortunatelly i could not understand quite clearly whats said there.

so, i mean, im guessing that most of the connectors on a PSU have a +12v rail, taking the GPU ones as an example, my psu afaik has one cable with 2 6+2 pin connector for my graphics card, im just guessing that each cable has a +12v rail?

then, what actually is this single rail or multiple rail? its confusing really, are they like multiple lines for each of these 6+2 pin? because I have little knowledge in psu workings i couldnt get to a conclusion on that article.
Reply With Quote


  #7  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:17 AM
DevBiker's Avatar
DevBiker DevBiker is offline
CORSAIR Beta Team
DevBiker's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 7,367
POST ID # = 1011793
DevBiker Reputation: 88
Default

A single connector with 2 connectors is NOT multiple rails.
The rail is implemented on the PSU, not in the cable. You may have a rail for each PSU connection (in a modular PSU). It depends on how its implemented.

As noted in the link to jonnyguru, multiple rails is for safety. It prevents any single 12V rail from having too much current. You DO NOT want 1000W (83A) of power going down a single connector!! Multiple rails prevent that.
__________________
Please click "Edit System Specs" and fill out your system info.

This comment is provided "as-is", without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the sanity or mental fitness of the author. The author is not a Corsair employee, does not represent Corsair, and no comment should be construed as an official statement from Corsair.

Reply With Quote


  #8  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:27 AM
RodrigoDRT RodrigoDRT is offline
Registered User
RodrigoDRT's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 59
POST ID # = 1011794
RodrigoDRT Reputation: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DevBiker View Post
A single connector with 2 connectors is NOT multiple rails.
The rail is implemented on the PSU, not in the cable. You may have a rail for each PSU connection (in a modular PSU). It depends on how its implemented.

As noted in the link to jonnyguru, multiple rails is for safety. It prevents any single 12V rail from having too much current. You DO NOT want 1000W (83A) of power going down a single connector!! Multiple rails prevent that.
i see, then if i get this right, is possible that a cheap psu has a single rail (pcb goldy line thinigies) powering multiple (12v) connectors, leading to an overload.

if i get this right, the multiple rails COULD mean that in the aforementioned example, 6+2 connectors have a rail for each one of them, right?

makes me wonder, however, why would theres even a selector for single or multi, seems like multi is the best way to go, no?
Reply With Quote


  #9  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:31 AM
DevBiker's Avatar
DevBiker DevBiker is offline
CORSAIR Beta Team
DevBiker's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 7,367
POST ID # = 1011795
DevBiker Reputation: 88
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodrigoDRT View Post
i see, then if i get this right, is possible that a cheap psu has a single rail (pcb goldy line thinigies) powering multiple (12v) connectors, leading to an overload.
Yup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodrigoDRT View Post
if i get this right, the multiple rails COULD mean that in the aforementioned example, 6+2 connectors have a rail for each one of them, right?
Yes, they'd be separate cables each going back to the PSU rail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodrigoDRT View Post
makes me wonder, however, why would theres even a selector for single or multi, seems like multi is the best way to go, no?
There are rare and unusual edge cases where multirail can cause problems. And some people insist. Some people also insist that the moon landing was faked and the earth is flat, too. But yeah, 99.95% of the time multi rail is the way to go. Because safety.
__________________
Please click "Edit System Specs" and fill out your system info.

This comment is provided "as-is", without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the sanity or mental fitness of the author. The author is not a Corsair employee, does not represent Corsair, and no comment should be construed as an official statement from Corsair.

Reply With Quote


  #10  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:43 AM
RodrigoDRT RodrigoDRT is offline
Registered User
RodrigoDRT's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 59
POST ID # = 1011796
RodrigoDRT Reputation: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DevBiker View Post
Yup.


Yes, they'd be separate cables each going back to the PSU rail.


There are rare and unusual edge cases where multirail can cause problems. And some people insist. Some people also insist that the moon landing was faked and the earth is flat, too. But yeah, 99.95% of the time multi rail is the way to go. Because safety.
ah thats all great information, ill keep reading on the subject, I think ive found some info about how single rails are literally larger and can carry a higher intensity (amperes) if im right, thus, would make sense if say, on a multi rail mode a line can only handle so many amps and something is drawing more than it can, blowing it up (hyperbole), but i assume multi rail thingies are probably made so they will handle anything up to date

been a while i've been so curious to know how something works, not sure why.
Reply With Quote


  #11  
Old 07-19-2019, 10:59 AM
DevBiker's Avatar
DevBiker DevBiker is offline
CORSAIR Beta Team
DevBiker's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 7,367
POST ID # = 1011799
DevBiker Reputation: 88
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodrigoDRT View Post
ah thats all great information, ill keep reading on the subject, I think ive found some info about how single rails are literally larger and can carry a higher intensity (amperes) if im right, thus, would make sense if say, on a multi rail mode a line can only handle so many amps and something is drawing more than it can, blowing it up (hyperbole), but i assume multi rail thingies are probably made so they will handle anything up to date

been a while i've been so curious to know how something works, not sure why.
They aren't necessarily physically larger (lower gauge). They do carry higher current (amps) before tripping. Same wire + higher amps == melting wire. Hence ... multi rail for safety.
__________________
Please click "Edit System Specs" and fill out your system info.

This comment is provided "as-is", without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the sanity or mental fitness of the author. The author is not a Corsair employee, does not represent Corsair, and no comment should be construed as an official statement from Corsair.

Reply With Quote


  #12  
Old 07-20-2019, 01:26 PM
Vegan Vegan is offline
Hardcore Games
Vegan's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 205
POST ID # = 1011903
Vegan Reputation: 10
Default

My AX860i has separate OCP for each PCIe cable and EPS12V cable. It can be set from 20A to 40A (default).

The AX860i can move power around as needed just like any modern PSU.

A few cards with 3 8-pin PCIe power are out there which is why my AX860i comes with lots of cables.
__________________

Corsair SPEC-01 chassis with the Corsair HX1000i PSU

Hardcore Games - Legendary of the Only Way to Play

I have been a vegan since 1969. I have experienced more prejudice than anyone could possibly ever imagine.
Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.