The Corsair User Forums  

Go Back   The Corsair User Forums > Corsair Product Discussion > Cooling

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-27-2020, 03:00 PM
tommy2911 tommy2911 is offline
Registered User
tommy2911's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Italy
Posts: 9
POST ID # = 1048158
tommy2911 Reputation: 10
Default AIO + Case Fan Curve

Hello,
I would like to ask some advice about the fans curve of my setup.
I'm not sure if I chose a too aggressive cooling ramp to keep temps low. Now it's getting hotter at home and the pc has started becoming a bit too noisy.

That's the build.
i7 9700k - Z390 Aorus Ultra - RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio - 32gb Trident Z RGB C16 3200 MHz - Corsair H115i RGB Platinum - EVGA SuperNovaT2 850W - Corsair Obsidian 500D RGB SE - Samsung 970evo plus 500gb

I have 4 fan installed in the case, 3 in the front and 1 in the back; while the AIO is on the top. I put the CCPro sensors: one between the cpu and the vrm, one near the ram modules just over the gpu, one below the gpu near the psu cover and the last one on the back, near the top of the case, over the HDD.
I set case fans to follow the T of the sensor near the cpu and AIO fans the coolant T. While gpu fans start working when it reaches 25°C, so always.
CPU is OC at 5Ghz, vcore 1.285v but when it's really hot I go down to 4.9Ghz at 1.240v. No AVX offset
That's the temps I'm getting today with 24.5°C in the room after 1h of browsing.


While these are from yesterday; it was a little hotter, I think around 26°C:


What do you think about temps and curves? Too safe? Or it's ok to increase iddling T?
Thanks in advance for the feedback
Reply With Quote


  #2  
Old 05-27-2020, 05:39 PM
c-attack c-attack is offline
Registered User
c-attack's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 11,543
POST ID # = 1048177
c-attack c-attack Reputation: 116
Default

It would be nice if an extra 200 rpm on your fan curve knocked 5-10C off the device temperature, but it doesn't usually work that way. If you feel like the fans are getting loud, relax the curve a bit. The real underlying change is the seasonal shift in room temp. There's usually not much you can do about that. +5C room temp means +5C to everything in the box.

I think you can flatten the AIO curve a bit. The difference between 1800 rpm and 1300 rpm is usually about 2C and that is for a 300W load. You are more likely to average half of that with 9700K, so go ahead and slow things down. +1C coolant temp = +1C CPU temp, so you can analyze any differences.

For internal hardware, this stuff matters even less. Other than something like an exposed m.2 drive, most things won't change temp with +-200 rpm. The GPU will get all its cooling from its own fans. As long as you the keep the intake/exhaust airflow going, the waste heat gets moved out and it won't be worse. I understand the inclination to try and get it degree perfect and I have to stop myself from doing the same thing on my new build. However, at the end of the day, taking 150 rpm off somewhere likely makes it much more pleasing to the ear, compared to the 0.6C difference you'll never notice unless you look for it.
Reply With Quote


  #3  
Old 05-28-2020, 06:57 AM
tommy2911 tommy2911 is offline
Registered User
tommy2911's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Italy
Posts: 9
POST ID # = 1048248
tommy2911 Reputation: 10
Default

Thanks a lot for the explanation. So, basically you think I can reduce both AIO and case fans, right?
Maybe, for the AIO I can set a curve less aggressive at the beginning and with an abrupt increase at high temps that I reach while gaming. At that point I don’t care about noise.
It’s ok to control case fans speed in function to the T of the sensor near the cpu or it’s better to use a less hot sensor, like the one near the ram?
Reply With Quote


  #4  
Old 05-28-2020, 08:10 AM
c-attack c-attack is offline
Registered User
c-attack's PC Specs
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 11,543
POST ID # = 1048256
c-attack c-attack Reputation: 116
Default

Yes, go ahead and flatten the AIO curve a bit. Remember if the coolant only goes up +5C when gaming, the most you can reduce cpu temps by is that same 5C, no matter how fast the fans run. In reality, there will always be some coolant temp rise and since the sensor is right after heat pick up, +2-3C delta over idle coolant is as low as you go.

It doesn’t matter which T sensor you use, as long as the results are predictable and across a large enough range to offer meaningful control. If the temp range is only 39-43C, it may be to small and the jumps in speed to large. The larger the change from idle to load, the more you can tailor the curve to your needs.
Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
fans, icue, temperature

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.