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  #1  
Old 06-15-2014, 04:25 PM
aartx aartx is offline
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Woah! Help! Corsair RM850W

Hi. Im a little worried my psu is going to be damaged, it is really hot. Been playing bf4 for a couple of hours and the PSU fan is not spinning. If I'm going into bios and exit again without doing anything, the psu fan starts spinning before entering windows. But if I do a regular restart it doesnt spin.

This psu is supposed to spin at a certain temperature but have not yet seen it spin. Can someone pls help me? Is it a certain cable I have to plug into my motherboard for it to recognize that its too hot or something?


My speccs are:
MSI Gtx 770 2gb
ASUS z87-pro
Intel i5-4440 3.1ghz
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  #2  
Old 06-15-2014, 08:01 PM
Frmg Frmg is offline
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Same issue here but with a RM750
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  #3  
Old 06-16-2014, 12:18 PM
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You are not pulling enough power to get the fan to turn on. With an RM850 you would need to be pulling over 350 watts, closer to 375 @ 25c for awhile before the fan will turn on. With the hardware you have that is not going to happen. If the PSU was getting to hot the fan would turn on, you just have not hit that point yet. To give an example, with a single 780 GTX and a 3960k overclocked to 4.4 running furmark and prime95 I could not get the fan to come on. It was not until I installed a second 780 GTX that I could get the fan to come on.
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2014, 12:41 PM
Frmg Frmg is offline
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Ok, but this is nonsense.
The Psu depend only on the load power and ignore the temperature to the fan start spinning is a serious design error.

On the analogy of a car radiators, imagine that the radiator fan turned only when the engine load was greater than 40% ignoring the engine temperature.

The engine could even continue running, but certainly would have drastically reduced their useful life.

That is the question.
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  #5  
Old 06-16-2014, 08:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frmg View Post
Ok, but this is nonsense.
The Psu depend only on the load power and ignore the temperature to the fan start spinning is a serious design error.

On the analogy of a car radiators, imagine that the radiator fan turned only when the engine load was greater than 40% ignoring the engine temperature.

The engine could even continue running, but certainly would have drastically reduced their useful life.

That is the question.
It does take into account temperature, but only the temperature inside the PSU. Yours is not getting hot enough to turn on the fan. What you may not realize is that the internals of the PSU are designed to run at 80c or higher, hence the 85c and 105c capacitors inside of PSU's. Just because your PSU is warm or hot to the touch does not mean it is actually higher then the design specifications of the unit.
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Old 06-16-2014, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpDFre@k View Post
It does take into account temperature, but only the temperature inside the PSU. Yours is not getting hot enough to turn on the fan. What you may not realize is that the internals of the PSU are designed to run at 80c or higher, hence the 85c and 105c capacitors inside of PSU's. Just because your PSU is warm or hot to the touch does not mean it is actually higher then the design specifications of the unit.
These are the limits of operation of the capacitors my friend.
This does not mean that the normal operation of the PSU has to be in the limit of temperature. 85ºC is insane

So the question now is...
What is the inside PSU temperature that start spinning off the fan without taking into account the consumption load?

I don't believe that you talking seriously about i don't get the right temperature to start the fan. ;)
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  #7  
Old 06-17-2014, 07:38 AM
abn505 abn505 is offline
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I have a RM 850 also. I had the same issue, see my specs. When I had only one 760GTX GPU, the fan would never turn on when playing battlefield 4 or with any benchmarks I threw at it. Oh, by the way I have a serial number 5 numbers before the recall. After installing a second 760GTX in the winter, it would take 2 plus hours of playing battelfield 4 before the fan kicked on. During this summer in the Chicago area it takes anywhere from 45 minutes to 1.5 hours before kicking on. It also has a lot to do with your rooms temps as well. I always would check by touching the PSU if it ever was truly hot when the fan did not kick on. It would only be warm to the touch. Now having said all that, I have a 750D case with 4 fans currently. The case is very roomy to allow airflow. I have had the RM850 for around 10 months with no thermal issues yet. The RM850 has a 5 year warranty, which I am sure Corsair will honor knowing of the possible worst case scenario with the potential thermal issue.
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Old 06-17-2014, 08:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abn505 View Post
I am sure Corsair will honor knowing of the possible worst case scenario with the potential thermal issue.
Of course...

I have a RM750 and i dont care about the possible of my PSY die.
if this happen i will just start a RMA process, but the major problem is a overall heating inside my case that is obviosly damaging the other components that aren't cover by Corsair warranty.
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  #9  
Old 06-18-2014, 07:19 AM
abn505 abn505 is offline
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Keep an eye on your temps. My CPU maxes out around 60c with a Zalman 9900max air cooler. When the PSU fan kicks on it brings it down to around 55c, this while playing games like Battlefield 4. My top card runs around 77-80c and bottom card runs around 72-75c when playing Battlefield 4 they drop about 5c when the PSU fan kicks on. This is well below damaging temps for the CPU and GPU. At idle everything is around 30c, without the PSU fan on. I have 4 case fans now, three intake and one exhausting in the back. I am considering two more for the top for exhaust, but not sure if I really need it.
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:33 PM
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I'm using the box cpu of AMD FX-8120 so my temp is high.

I will look temperatures, but how i don't use 40% of the PSU load, no matter what temperatures i have the fan appears that will never spin.

I repeat its a nonsense a PSU fan ignore the temperatures and consider only the wattage load. The PC could be burning and the fan will never spin?

What the hell is happening with your engineers Corsair?!?
The ultra silence purpose could be obtained by other way.
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frmg View Post
I'm using the box cpu of AMD FX-8120 so my temp is high.

I will look temperatures, but how i don't use 40% of the PSU load, no matter what temperatures i have the fan appears that will never spin.

I repeat its a nonsense a PSU fan ignore the temperatures and consider only the wattage load. The PC could be burning and the fan will never spin?

What the hell is happening with your engineers Corsair?!?
The ultra silence purpose could be obtained by other way.
actually using wattage to measure temps is quite accurate as any amount of wattage can only produce a certain degree of heat.you cant have say 100 watts produce 60c one minute and then 70c in another instance.,it will always be within the same range.
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  #12  
Old 06-19-2014, 03:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frmg View Post
Ok, but this is nonsense.
The Psu depend only on the load power and ignore the temperature to the fan start spinning is a serious design error.

On the analogy of a car radiators, imagine that the radiator fan turned only when the engine load was greater than 40% ignoring the engine temperature.

The engine could even continue running, but certainly would have drastically reduced their useful life.

That is the question.
Sorry but as you don't understand PSU technology you really don't understand the internal combustion engine, ALL watercooled cars have a thermostat and until the correct operating temp of the engine is reached the water in the radiator is blocked of.
I agree with you about the PSU temps but feel any box in your house almost none have fans but all of them have very warm cases electronic components are designed to run at a certain temp for a MTBF and Corsair warrant the PSU for 5 years so they must be confident it is OK, they sell more enthusiast PSU than any other maker and on here the percentage of problems probably relate to 00.1% of sales if not less.

PS
I am not bashing you just trying to get you to feel happy that you have a proper functioning PSU, if you want to check please read this:
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php...Story&reid=369
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  #13  
Old 06-19-2014, 04:05 PM
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A blog that you should really read for more info on the RM ZeroRPM mode.

http://www.corsair.com/en-us/blog/20...e/rm_fan-speed
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