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  #61  
Old 08-26-2019, 02:27 PM
jonnyguru jonnyguru is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h.lecter View Post
Ok mY bad, there is no such thing as a black and white AX860i.
I suppose voids my question.
Should I accept a RM850i as a replacement?
No way! Don't settle for less than an HX850i!
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  #62  
Old 08-27-2019, 10:19 PM
Vegan Vegan is offline
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Originally Posted by jonnyguru View Post
No way! Don't settle for less than an HX850i!
I received an HX1000i which is much bigger and it seems to be slightly even more efficient when playing games.
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  #63  
Old 09-16-2019, 09:34 PM
thespydz thespydz is offline
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Idea Excuse me but i'm not sure to understand ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corsair Kevin View Post
Hi NMD,
There are two parts to this. The base case for the issue stems from how much pressure is applied to the connections on the modular cable PCB on the PSU, whether that’s when the connectors are being plugged/unplugged or how tightly they’re being tied together for cable management. Essentially, if enough pressure is applied, it can cause the PCB to flex, which leads to the second part of the issue. In some situations, the flex can cause a surface mount ceramic capacitor (MLCC) solder joint to come undone. This means that if the PCB is not physically strained causing it to flex, the capacitor makes contact and works exactly as intended, which is the vast majority of units. But if there is excessive thermal buildup AND the capacitor is flexed off the solder joint due to physical pressure, the issue may present itself as intermittent reboots and/or shutdowns. This intermittent scenario makes it difficult to reproduce or narrow the issue down. However, because some folks are experiencing this issue with the PSU, we want to rectify it, no pun intended. This is also why there are many, many AX860i units out in the wild that work without issue.
Hello,
I was wondering...

I was experiencing random reboots with my brand new rig, trying to find where the issue came from, testing my ram, processor, testing all that could be with OCCT, un-pluging and re-pluging everything, re-formating.... And, finaly, i discovered this thread.

The joy i feel to finaly discover that the issue come from the PSU is a bit tempered by the explanation given...

How is it possible that the "cable management" ( as stated ) could bend the PCB ?????

Does 0.5g of pressure from cable management could be sufficient to make such a high-end PSU to malfunction ???

I really don't understand how it is, physically speaking, possible...

For the record, i didn't do any cable management on my rig btw.

Thanks in advance for your answer, i'm just asking because i'm trying and want to understand.
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