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Found 6 results

  1. I'm looking to finally take the plunge and get a gaming PC. I was wanting to get a horizontal HTPC to sit under my (rather marvelous) 55" 4K TV. I am not into tower PCs and never have been - yes, I'm one of those console gamer turncoats who wants the power of PC gaming in a console gaming experience. Sue me. :P I also really want to get into VR gaming. I was going to get the now discontinued Corsair Bulldog and build a 8700k/1080 ti setup myself (I'm also one of the freaks who actually liked the Bulldog design :P). But then I found out about the Corsair One and how it's pretty much everything I'm looking for - uber-small form factor, insanely quiet, and the most powerful components - all preassembled. And to top it all it has a HDMI port on the front for VR. AND it looks like something out of Tron. :sunglasse It's only missing one attribute I needed - it's not horizontal. And it doesn't fit in my TV stand, even at such a small form factor. And due to my living room setup there's nowhere near my TV that it will really fit. So my stupid question that I'm pretty sure I already know the answer to is this: can the Corsair One be put on its side and used horizontally? Obviously taking measures to elevate it and not block any vents etc. I know most normal gaming PCs can do this and many people do without issue - but the Corsair One ain't no ordinary gaming PC. I'm sure the answer is a "No, obviously not, you stupid n00b..." but I thought I may as well ask and check before I get the thing.
  2. I've just finished building my Bulldog 2.0 Barebones system, and it was pretty interesting to say the least. This is going to be a run down of my first impressions on the new machine. The first thing I noticed is how well everything was packed in the box. Everything was fairly secure. It wasn't too flashy, but it was functional. Big Styrofoam blocks held the chassis in place, and the Z270 motherboard was preinstalled along with the H6 SF liquid cooler and the PSU. The liquid cooler contact had pre-installed thermal compound, was covered by a plastic guard, wrapped in bubble wrap, and stuffed inside a small cardboard box. Starting the build was easy-peasy. Removing two screws allowed the top cover to come off, after unplugging the LED connector of course. I seated the CPU in the socket, closed the bracket, installed the H6 SF cooler, put the ram in, and booted it up. Post successful! After a successful post, I loosened the motherboard to install my M.2 MyDigitalSSD 480GB SSD (HIGHLY recommend these! Cheap and fast!) and shoved my RX 480 Gaming X 8GB from MSI into the GPU area. I can't fit any of the drive trays or anything back in with this GPU, as it's a little too big. After all this was done, I installed Windows 10 via a USB flash drive, installed drivers, and installed HWMonitor to check on the temps. I was expecting to see great temps because of the liquid cooler, but what I saw was most certainly not great temps. I was getting around 80 celcius on the CPU IDLE. I thought, that can't be right! So I checked in the bios. Sure enough, 80 celcius. I felt the tubes on the cooler, one was cold, one hot. I could feel the vibrations from the pump running. I figured I didn't get the cooler on straight, so I reseated it. Still 80 degrees celcius. I reseated it again with some cryorig thermal paste instead of the stock stuff. Brought the temps down to 70 degrees celcius. I then ran a stress test, and managed to get the temps to 100 celcius in around fifteen seconds! I didn't want to damage anything so I stopped the stress test. I then reseated the cooler with some arctic silver thermal paste. Still the same results. After all this I was fed up and took the H6 SF out and replaced it with a cryorig C7 air cooler (there IS enough clearance for a taller one). Temps are now down to 35 celcius idle and 85 under full load. It's a temporary fix I hope. I've submitted a support ticket. I hope it's just a dud and nobody else has this issue. Other than the H6 SF woes, this kit is great. Very quiet. The cryorig cooler adds some noise, but with a working H6 SF, I'm sure it would be near silent. Build quality is excellent. I was able to dismantle the case to remove the radiator quite easily. I also removed the fan from the radiator and used it as an exhaust fan for the case. Air cooling does work fairly well in this case! I do recommend this kit, but be weary of the H6 SF, as it is new, and I may have gotten a dud. I'm going to attempt to RMA the cooler if Corsair will let me.
  3. This is only for Bulldog systems that are equipped with Z270 motherboards. Version E7A66IZ1.1QA includes micro-code updates 0x84 and 0xC2 to address the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities. Installation instructions: Download E7A66IZ1.1QA here. Unzip downloaded file and copy-paste the file to the root of a USB drive. Reboot to BIOS with USB drive plugged into Bulldog system. Select M-Flash. Select BIOS update file from USB drive and follow the prompts to completion.
  4. Hi There, There have been numerous updates to the Z270i BIOS by MSI, including critical security patches. When can we expect to see an updated BIOS for the Bulldog? Thanks
  5. Spectre and Meltdown Vulnerabilities Affected CORSAIR Products These vulnerabilities affect: • Bulldog (with motherboard) • Bulldog 2.0 • CORSAIR ONE What are Spectre and Meltdown? Undoubtedly there is some alarm about the security exploits dubbed “Meltdown” and “Spectre,” both of which center around a fundamental design principle of modern processors. High performance processors designed within the last ten to fifteen years can predict with a high degree of success what the next instructions will be when performing a task, and in doing so are able to substantially improve performance. This “speculative design” is one of the cornerstones of modern high-performance computing. Unfortunately, researchers have recently discovered two security exploits you may have heard about, dubbed “Meltdown” and “Spectre,” which abuse speculative design through virtual machines (virtual PCs running on top of existing hardware.) We’ll talk about Meltdown first. Meltdown is a flaw endemic to Intel processors designed over the past decade and affects almost all of them, dating back to at least the original Core i7 and including all the way up to the recently released Coffee Lake and Skylake-X processors. This is something intrinsic to the silicon itself; it can’t be remedied by a BIOS update. Note that this does not affect AMD processors. Patches have already been released for major operating systems (including Windows) to close this exploit. You may have heard of an upwards of 30% performance impact as a result of the security patch, but note that this is primarily on the data center side. Our customers will receive the patch automatically from Microsoft and should see virtually no performance loss; TechSpot ran both synthetic and real world benchmarks and revealed no perceptible difference to end users (https://www.techspot.com/article/1556-meltdown-and-spectre-cpu-performance-windows/). The other flaw is Spectre, and it affects all modern processors, Intel and AMD alike, extending even to smartphone processsors. This exploits any modern CPUs that utilize speculative designs to improve performance. The industry is collectively working on ways to solve this problem, but because of its nature as a fundamental exploit in modern processor design, this is going to take a longer period of time to fix. Individual software suites will need to be patched to close this exploit. On the flipside, Spectre is also much harder to abuse than Meltdown is, and it’s important to note that in both cases, these are read only exploits. On their own, they can’t run malicious code on your PC, and they can’t open the door to additional malware. Additionally, they require code to run locally on a system in order to work at all. What to Do Intel, Microsoft, NVIDIA, AMD, and other software and hardware vendors are working aggressively to mitigate Meltdown and Spectre. Here are some things you can do to protect yourself. Update Windows One of the easiest things you can do is make sure Windows is up to date. Windows 10 installs updates automatically, but to manually check, do the following: 1. Click the Start button. 2. Click the Settings (gear-shaped) icon. 3. Click “Update & Security.” 4. Click “Windows Update.” 5. Click “Check for updates.” Update Your Video Card Drivers The next thing you can do is update your video card drivers. You can always get the most recent version of your drivers from https://www.geforce.com/drivers if you have an NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, or http://www.amd.com if you have an AMD Radeon graphics card. For CORSAIR ONE users, we are providing an updated graphics card driver on our download page (http://www.corsair.com/en-us/downloads). You can also visit the product page for your CORSAIR ONE model to download the updated driver. Update Your BIOS The BIOS in your CORSAIR ONE or Bulldog system will also need to be updated to mitigate Meltdown and Spectre. We are working with Intel and our motherboard vendors to provide these updates; once they are available, they will appear in this section with instructions on how to perform the update.
  6. Spectre and Meltdown Vulnerabilities Affected CORSAIR Products These vulnerabilities affect: • Bulldog (with motherboard) • Bulldog 2.0 • CORSAIR ONE What are Spectre and Meltdown? Undoubtedly there is some alarm about the security exploits dubbed “Meltdown” and “Spectre,” both of which center around a fundamental design principle of modern processors. High performance processors designed within the last ten to fifteen years can predict with a high degree of success what the next instructions will be when performing a task, and in doing so are able to substantially improve performance. This “speculative design” is one of the cornerstones of modern high-performance computing. Unfortunately, researchers have recently discovered two security exploits you may have heard about, dubbed “Meltdown” and “Spectre,” which abuse speculative design through virtual machines (virtual PCs running on top of existing hardware.) We’ll talk about Meltdown first. Meltdown is a flaw endemic to Intel processors designed over the past decade and affects almost all of them, dating back to at least the original Core i7 and including all the way up to the recently released Coffee Lake and Skylake-X processors. This is something intrinsic to the silicon itself; it can’t be remedied by a BIOS update. Note that this does not affect AMD processors. Patches have already been released for major operating systems (including Windows) to close this exploit. You may have heard of an upwards of 30% performance impact as a result of the security patch, but note that this is primarily on the data center side. Our customers will receive the patch automatically from Microsoft and should see virtually no performance loss; TechSpot ran both synthetic and real world benchmarks and revealed no perceptible difference to end users (https://www.techspot.com/article/1556-meltdown-and-spectre-cpu-performance-windows/). The other flaw is Spectre, and it affects all modern processors, Intel and AMD alike, extending even to smartphone processsors. This exploits any modern CPUs that utilize speculative designs to improve performance. The industry is collectively working on ways to solve this problem, but because of its nature as a fundamental exploit in modern processor design, this is going to take a longer period of time to fix. Individual software suites will need to be patched to close this exploit. On the flipside, Spectre is also much harder to abuse than Meltdown is, and it’s important to note that in both cases, these are read only exploits. On their own, they can’t run malicious code on your PC, and they can’t open the door to additional malware. Additionally, they require code to run locally on a system in order to work at all. What to Do Intel, Microsoft, NVIDIA, AMD, and other software and hardware vendors are working aggressively to mitigate Meltdown and Spectre. Here are some things you can do to protect yourself. Update Windows One of the easiest things you can do is make sure Windows is up to date. Windows 10 installs updates automatically, but to manually check, do the following: 1. Click the Start button. 2. Click the Settings (gear-shaped) icon. 3. Click “Update & Security.” 4. Click “Windows Update.” 5. Click “Check for updates.” Update Your Video Card Drivers The next thing you can do is update your video card drivers. You can always get the most recent version of your drivers from https://www.geforce.com/drivers if you have an NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, or http://www.amd.com if you have an AMD Radeon graphics card. For CORSAIR ONE users, we are providing an updated graphics card driver on our download page (http://www.corsair.com/en-us/downloads). You can also visit the product page for your CORSAIR ONE model to download the updated driver. Update Your BIOS The BIOS in your CORSAIR ONE or Bulldog system will also need to be updated to mitigate Meltdown and Spectre. We are working with Intel and our motherboard vendors to provide these updates; once they are available, they will appear in this section with instructions on how to perform the update.
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