Jump to content
Corsair Community

Dual Channel Overclocking with Corsair


Croc

Recommended Posts

There seems to be a LOT of people with problems combining dual channel and overclocking on Intel 865 and 875 boards. In spite of Ram Guy minimizing the numbers, I think that a lot of overclockers search forums and compare notes before buying and I am seeing the questions everywhere I look. Right now a LOT ( subjective I took no polls ) are looking at other solutions than Corsair. OCZ was recently recommended to me by a website reviewer who knows the products well and opted for OCZ on his Abit IC7 board. My questions: Does Corsair test on the Intel Springdale and Canterwood boards. I noticed the validations on the 3700 parts seem to be all AMD even though the Intel boards are very much in favour now. What's up with that? Where can I find the information on the actual chips Corsair uses? What are the speed ratings - 6, 5, 4.5 nanoseconds for instance? I don't want Windbond CH5 chips for sure. Why is it necessary to get "matched" sets for even light overclocking performance? Is this a manufacturing quality issue? This has never been an issue until dual channel and people are paying a hefty premium now.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The -5, -6, etc. are terms commonly used in the semiconductor industry to rate speed bins for chips. -5 means that the minimum clock period that you can run stable WITH MARGIN is 5ns. To get the frequency, just take the inverse of this which equals 200MHz (ie DDR 400). When the wafer comes off the assembly line, all the die get tested by an automated tester to determine how fast each one is. The fastest silicon get dropped into the -5 bucket. Slower ones get into the -6 bucket, etc. This has been my biggest problem with Corsair's business model. When you look at Corsair's XMS3200C2 modules, they use the Winbond -6 grade memory chips. These are chips that Winbond has determine are only suitable for 166MHz = DDR333 operation. What Corsair, and other companies like them, do is take these -6 speed parts and run them through their own tests. If they work at DDR400, they mark them and sell them as DDR400 parts. The problem is that Winbond has determined that -6 parts are DDR333 parts for good reason. Even though they would love to put -6 parts in the -5 bin to get a higher profit, they can't do it with acceptable margin. Corsair is essentially remarking a part that has been overclocked and will thus have unacceptable margin. If you look closely at the literature, all the parts are tested with a single DIMM and pass before are badged with XMS3200, XMS3500, etc. The problem is that when a user sees a part that is DDR400 compliant, he/she doesn't realize that it's only really reliable for 1 DIMM. When you add multiple DIMMS, which most folks are doing for the current dual channel chipsets, you increase the loading on the bus and you start to see problems (the signal integrity is severely degraded via reflections and impedance mismatches). This is as expected because Corsair has not designed any acceptable margin into the module. It's a little bit deceptive marketing. This is not to single out Corsair. As a third party memory vendor, they offer other value added services such as excellent tech support and great warranty. My contention is with the deceptive marketing and the lack of margin that the modules contain. For example, if you follow Winbond's ratings, and XMS3500 is really a DDR400 and the XMS3200 is really a DDR333. Corsair should take the responsibility to mark them correctly. At the very least, they should test them with the maximum number of slots populated before declaring that a part is truly DDR400 complaint.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well said. I have the biggest issue with Corsair and others not coming clean about what they ARE using. It's not to say they don't perform or, if they don't, that Corsair does not stand behind them. For me there has been a quantum leap in performance requirements for dual channel and Corsair has not met the challenge in their ver1.2 sticks. For the exhorbitant price I just don't think they are value added at all. From I am hearing, the 4000 stuff is just rebadged 3700. Interesting that some have gone to Buffalo Technologies to get their Abit boards working. My bus has done well with genreic Samsung.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, I've also heard a lot of people that have no problems when using generic memories at DDR 400. I guess the generics are badged properly. I feel really bad when I read these forums and I see the reponses to issues that claim the problem is with the MB or the BIOS. That may be but it's most likely due to the RAM not having the headroom to tolerate different motherboards or BIOS settings or number of modules installed. If a customer is using a motherboard from a different manufacturer or chooses to add more memory, all at stock settings, he should not have to deal with any errors because he is not doing anything unusual. This is why we add safety margins into the speed bins and it's exactly why Winbond's -6 parts should not be badged as DDR 400 compliant. Ok, I can understand if there are errors do to problems in manufacturing. However, most of the errors I have seen on these forums are not manufacturing problems but timing problems. Anyone who overclocks knows that Intel's CPUs can go much higher than the rated clock speed. Can you imagine what kind of problems people would have if a 2.6GHz CPU fails at 2.601 GHz ? If the Phase lock loop has just a little bit more jitter or the oscillator drifts, you'll BSOD. FYI, I've been a long time Corsair customer and still plan to be in the future. However, like other people, I constantly evaluate other memory brands. In this highly competitive industry, there's no room to ignore dissatisfied customers.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes it does make you wonder. The OEM builds whack in whatever generic DDR400 is currently at Supercom or wherever. I rarely see top tier or even 2 tier boards that don't just work out of the box with that stuff. Of course these boxes are not for overclockers but the people expect the builds to work and be stable at stock. Most just go in at SPD. So it makes you wonder about some of the expensive "overclocker" sticks. In some cases though I think the mobo bios versions are a bit immature. For Abit for instance I think they concentrated on getting the speed crown and forgot about stable for a bit on the Springdale boards. The IC7 seems more stable. Not surprising as they all went for MAM, PAT or whatever each called it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To answer the questions...Corsair has tested on the Canterwood and Springdale platforms on various boards for compatibility (though not all boards), so they do use Intel products as well as AMD for compatibility. As far as knowing the chips that are on the memory itself, I am not really sure, as I'm sure it changes with each new revision...you will have to ask the RAM GUY about that one, though I can assure you from experience that Corsair memory is top notch in performance and customer service. As far as Corsair selling overclocked memory...technically, companies like OCZ, Geil, etc. are doing the same thing...currently, the highest standard for memory is PC3200, and that is at a CAS 3...anything lower than that is overclocking the memory as well... Dual channel on previous boards, like the 845, posed some problems with overclocking, but with the advent of Springdale/Canterwood, the issues seem to be fading and overclocking performances have been stellar, especially with updated BIOS revisions by the major motherboard manufacturers. Buying dual channel kits is not always necessary for light overclocking, though the reason companies sell these kits is because they are pretested sticks that are guaranteed to work together at rated speeds and timings, if you don't have a guarantee like that, it is essentially a toss up, most of the time there are no issues, but if there are, there is nothing really to be done about it. Kits only help increase the likelihood of a quality dual channel overclock and flawless compatibility and thus is why they are recommended over two normal sticks just thrown together. :bigeyes:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting. Corsair is mostly top notch but they don't hit home runs every time. I don't really expect them too. IMHO, the latest 3700 was not a great stick and the rev. 1.2 does not seem to be as good as the 1.1. I could be wrong. I understand the idea of matched pairs but I just don't accept the premise that matched pairs should be necessary to meet the advertised spec in dual channel that they are sold at. Not just a Corsair thing. OCZ and others do it too. They are sold for dual channel operation, and to me, the prices we are paying for the stuff should ensure a decent level of QC without the extra $'s charged for so called matching. Above the guaranteed spec is NOT guaranteed anyway. OK so what does Corsair do in testing. Test the 2 matched sticks in an 865 or 875 mobo to guarantee a "match"? Just curious, I have no idea how they match sticks. Corair makes good stuff. But, I would like to see what chips are used and it's as easy as adding to the sticker on the heat spreader.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
corsair is extremely hard to get in new zealand so i was exited when i found a supplier who had them i was originally using geil on my asus A7N8X-X and i used to get very good overclocks with the geil i purchased the corsair xms3200 platinum series x2 sticks $400NZD and fuck me dead i have never had so much problem with memory than i have had with this stuff i also run a business selling pc parts as soon as i had this happen i removed corsair off my product list and replaced it with geil corsair get your shit together and get it right test on all motherboard models for compatibility and get your fucking ddr ratings on the label right :ar: :ar: :ar: :ar: :ar: :ar: i swapped the corsair for some kingston hyper x with a freind corsair caused so much shit on his pc he had to reformat it hes not happy and im not either as i have to do an ra with it to my supplier and get some other top performing ram so this is where i leave it corsair kiss my butt everyone stop buying corsair and use geil or mushkin i dont believe corsair is using bh-5 chips anymore i suspect version 1.2 is ch-5 winbond chips
Link to comment
Share on other sites

well maybe you have had some bad luck with the stick/s that you got from your supplier. Corsair is some of the best stuff you can buy, it is also the most compatible, being used in OC reviews by many sites. These sites had almost no problems in any motherboard, AMD or Intel alike, granted an updated BIOS fixed compatibility issues, but GEIL and OCZ still had problems! I have a question, can you run your pc3200 memory at 2-2-2-5-1T at 430MHz? Thats tough to beat. Granted the memory is expensive, but they stand behind it completely. Plus, they have this forum for you to voice your concerns and problems with many avid overclockers. The dual channel sorting is only so the end user does not have to try dimm after dimm to get there system stable and working at an acceptable speed. Me and my friends have tried GEIL and OCZ and found that it is not as worth the money as Corsair is. I have not personnaly tried the Kingston HyperX, but I do hear, although there is a lack of reviews to support my claim, that it is a high-end competitor. Dual channel memory is ALOT faster than single channel, and it is obviously noticeable when gaming or doing DV applications. *EDIT* As you can see in my sig. I am running the P3700 dual channel kit w/o any problems at all. They even get to PC4000 at their rated voltage, although it is unstable as the CPU is the limiter.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can never bank on any "one" brand of memory for every freakin' system out there. It's just not reasonable to expect that. I have had great luck with Corsair. And yes, I'm a AMD user. I have two cmx512-2700c2 sticks in my pc. I had problems initially when i tried to overclock to high lvls. But, I went to their website, got the bios settings for the memory timing, and BAM...i have memory rated at 333mhz running at 407mhz. And it's 100% stable. My AMD 2500+ Barton cpu, rated at 1.83ghz, is running overclocked at 2.24ghz. Running at 2.24ghz, it benchmarks close to a P4 2.8ghz. :eyebuldge Not sure where anyone would get the idea that pentiums are favored over AMD. When you can spend $89.99 for a AMD processor that hangs with a $300.00+ P4 chip...hmmmm.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by Slam [/i] [B]You can never bank on any "one" brand of memory for every freakin' system out there. It's just not reasonable to expect that. I have had great luck with Corsair. And yes, I'm a AMD user. I have two cmx512-2700c2 sticks in my pc. I had problems initially when i tried to overclock to high lvls. But, I went to their website, got the bios settings for the memory timing, and BAM...i have memory rated at 333mhz running at 407mhz. And it's 100% stable. My AMD 2500+ Barton cpu, rated at 1.83ghz, is running overclocked at 2.24ghz. Running at 2.24ghz, it benchmarks close to a P4 2.8ghz. :eyebuldge Not sure where anyone would get the idea that pentiums are favored over AMD. When you can spend $89.99 for a AMD processor that hangs with a $300.00+ P4 chip...hmmmm. [/B][/QUOTE] You are right that one brand isnt necessarily the best in every system out there, but I'm saying that out of me and my friends, who spend way to much on comp parts, have found that corsair has some of the nicest, fastest and most compatible RAM out there. Well pentiums are preferred by 1) an individual prefference and 2) by users who do DV applications. I am one that prefers the Intel based systems, and I do dislike the fact that they cost so much.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

the corsair memory i had was the platinum series(version 1.2) what version are you running my geil used to oc at 215 fsb(430) with no problems with the corsair running at cas 2 - 3 -3-7 it wouldnt even let me into windows 2.5 - 3 -3 -7 it used to boot into windows with no problems the minute i tried to get upto 200fsb that was it it used to crap out so if i could get version 1.1 corsair maybe i would give using it another shot by the way i am using a single channel board ok i wasnt using twinx it was straight xms but as stated i had better overclocking success on my 2500xp with geil memory than corsair the hyper x i currentlyu have set on 208 fsb (416) which gives my cpu an overclock of 2296.87 MHZ
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by hardcorepcnz [/i] [B]the corsair memory i had was the platinum series(version 1.2) what version are you running my geil used to oc at 215 fsb(430) with no problems with the corsair running at cas 2 - 3 -3-7 it wouldnt even let me into windows 2.5 - 3 -3 -7 it used to boot into windows with no problems the minute i tried to get upto 200fsb that was it it used to crap out so if i could get version 1.1 corsair maybe i would give using it another shot by the way i am using a single channel board ok i wasnt using twinx it was straight xms but as stated i had better overclocking success on my 2500xp with geil memory than corsair the hyper x i currentlyu have set on 208 fsb (416) which gives my cpu an overclock of 2296.87 MHZ [/B][/QUOTE] I see. The PC3200 I reffered to was the single channel CMX512-3200LLPT. This was used on a P4 2.4b. And currently being used as a friends temp ram at 420MHz @ 2-2-2-5-1T (2.4C @ 2.53GHz). The corsair seems to OC better on the Intel based platforms at the lower timings, and I do believe that I have a Rev 1.1, but I cannot be sure.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good post aradeath. I agree about corsair being one of the best. It has been the best i have used. I have been able to clock my system a lot higher with corsair...and keep it stable. Btw, I have nothing against intel at all. I used to be die hard intel until I tried an AMD chip. Hard to beat if you're looking to get the best bang for the buck. Peace.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by Slam [/i] [B]Good post aradeath. I agree about corsair being one of the best. It has been the best i have used. I have been able to clock my system a lot higher with corsair...and keep it stable. Btw, I have nothing against intel at all. I used to be die hard intel until I tried an AMD chip. Hard to beat if you're looking to get the best bang for the buck. Peace. [/B][/QUOTE] :D: Thank You Slam. Your right about the "bang for the buck" and that works well for most people, which is a good thing. Later
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as their quality is concerned, see my sig below. I have two different revision sticks of PC2700, both running quite merrily at 200MHz, at 2.8v, at 5-3-3-3.0 timings. I can run more agressive timings if I up the voltage to 2.9v, but that risks voiding my warr. with corsair, and I'd rather not do that. I did get one bad stick of corsair at one point, and found it easy to get a replacement, which has worked fine since. If you read various forums (I can't speak for the intel side, I'm an Nvidia/AMD man), all you'll hear is horror stories about EVERY brand of memory, and usually it's either: a. a bad stick of memory. b. user error/id10t error. Whereas if you read alot of hardware reviews, Geil and OCZ rarely meet their price/performance, and sometimes have massive issues. Most reviewers use Corsair or Hyper-X for their reviews, and for good reason. I would agree that the speed ratings, based on the revision chips, can be deceiving, but Corsair isn't alone in this, almost all the enthusiast mem is badged the same. I understand the v1.1 of the 3200's did use -5 Winbond, meaning they were correctly rated, but the newer versions use the -6 (which seems stupid, but was probably done for cost/profitability reasons). Just my 2 cents......
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you ever tried an AMD chip? One of the Barton class? Man, they are fun for pc tech heads. I am strictly gaming, so AMD works really well. You should build a secondary pc based on AMD. LOL... AMD 2500+ Barton (rated at 1.83ghz, running at 2.24ghz) 1gb Corsair (cmx512-2700c2 x2) 40gb Western Digital 7200rpm ATI Radeon 9500pro(overclocked to 9700pro) Gigabyte GA-7N400 Pro2 Dual-Channel motherboard(nforce2 chipset) Evercool CPU liquid cooling(didnt need it, but keeps the cpu 10-15 degrees celsius cooler. It was also just flat out interesting to me) SB Live My memory timing is set at 7-3-3-2.5 I'm wondering if I can set these a litte more aggressively. I know it didnt work at the default bios set it at... 6-2-2-2.0 I think.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by Slam [/i] [B]Have you ever tried an AMD chip? One of the Barton class? Man, they are fun for pc tech heads. I am strictly gaming, so AMD works really well. You should build a secondary pc based on AMD. LOL... AMD 2500+ Barton (rated at 1.83ghz, running at 2.24ghz) 1gb Corsair (cmx512-2700c2 x2) 40gb Western Digital 7200rpm ATI Radeon 9500pro(overclocked to 9700pro) Gigabyte GA-7N400 Pro2 Dual-Channel motherboard(nforce2 chipset) Evercool CPU liquid cooling(didnt need it, but keeps the cpu 10-15 degrees celsius cooler. It was also just flat out interesting to me) SB Live My memory timing is set at 7-3-3-2.5 I'm wondering if I can set these a litte more aggressively. I know it didnt work at the default bios set it at... 6-2-2-2.0 I think. [/B][/QUOTE] Well I do have a secondary system, but its an Intel one :sillygrin. The reason being is that it was made of leftover parts after I had upgraded my main computer. It is currently my Clan's dedicated gaming server (used for lan parties and whatnot). As for the mem timings I have had no luck with low timings and OCing using the CMX512-3200LLPT. On Intel systems however, the ram seems to run fine at OCed speeds and at timings of 2-2-2-5-1T. Well an AMD rig for me ATM is just not going to happen :D:. The problem being the graphics cards are too darned expensive for me to be buying 2 of them (One for the server and one for the AMD system, BTW I have a POS GFX card in the server and I will never do such a thing again as it is a larger waste of money). Maybe if I had a job to pay for this, but I don't, so its kinda hard.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[url]http://www.legitreviews.com/Reviews/ddr500_1.shtml[/url] Very interesting, looks like geil and ocz kinda have their own problems. People gripe alot more about ocz than corsair on abit forums. I own two abit boards the IC7-G and the IC7-MAX3. I use corsair in both boards with no problem. :greengrin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I for one have absolutely no problems with corsair memory or their support. When I started out with their ram I did have one bad stick which was promptly replaced once I contacted ramguy. I have been abel to run this Corsair 3200XMS C2 at a variety of speeds, 5-2-2-2 6-2-2-2 or 11-2-2-2 and it has never failed me. It is very easy to visit a variety of fourms and find people bitching about every brand of ram, bar none.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees
First thing let me set a few things straight that I have read here. I think you all should really take a look at [URL=http://www.houseofhelp.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=8048]XMS Qualification and Testing [/URL] and please read the whole post. It lists all of the modules that we make and the MB we use to validate it and the bios settings that are used.. Also links are given to the Data sheets. And we have Never held any information about what IC's we use unless it was a new part that was not announced yet. Second I know the extremes that we go through to ensure our product performs at the rated spec or better and there is no one that does the level of testing that we do with our modules. NO ONE! If you are lucky to find a module that meets your needs then I understand. But I think you will find that any one can have a one hit wonder as it were, but to consistently produce them and then guarantee it is a whole other question. So you are welcome to do as you wish. We consistently test other modules and IC's we know who is doing what. I think that you are missing the point. We manufacture modules and publish what we test them with and how we test them and always have. We give you a tested module to take some of the guesswork out of picking unknown modules and guarantee it to run at the rated speed. I see other's making that claim but I really do not see them follow through with it. I think the reason that we have done as well as we have is because we stand behind our product and do as much as possible to ensure that you as our valued customer have the best product possible. I think that one thing from us is, you know were we stand and how you stand with our product. Bottom line is we make a grate module and will do our best to see that you get the best module possible. All of you. Ram Guy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

it was an unfortunate experience for me that the 3200xms wouldnt run in my asus a7n8x-x but looking at the ddr400 compatibility chart on asus website i see that the twinx is the recommended ram for this board under the corsair brand but is twinx modules not exactly the same as xms but just a pair with same manufacturing date etc which makes a matched pair? i am at the moment using a transcend ram module (ddr333) with samsung tcb3 chips and it is hauling out at 420mhz ddr speed with timings of 2-3-2 precharge delay setting of 11 i still do not doubt the quality and high performance of corsair infact i still recommend it to people as i cannot judge against it just because i had a bad experience with it if i ever have a chance to put corsair back in my system i would honestly give the twinx modules a try or wait untill the pro series is released in new zealand by the way is there anyway i can get version 1.1 instead of version 1.2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees
Honestly! With regard to Revision 1.1 Verse’s. Rev 1.2 some of the reseller have listed the Revision that they have. And unfortunately sometimes charge a premium for it but that’s the only way right now. The IC's have changed and from Winbond Rev B is no longer in production. But I should mention that Rev C will sometimes clock higher as they will support Cass 3 which Rev B will not. But with any of our modules if they do not run at the tested settings we will be happy to replace them. Ram Guy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
[QUOTE][i]Originally posted by Ibiza [/i] [B]The -5, -6, etc. are terms commonly used in the semiconductor industry to rate speed bins for chips. -5 means that the minimum clock period that you can run stable WITH MARGIN is 5ns. To get the frequency, just take the inverse of this which equals 200MHz (ie DDR 400). When the wafer comes off the assembly line, all the die get tested by an automated tester to determine how fast each one is. The fastest silicon get dropped into the -5 bucket. Slower ones get into the -6 bucket, etc. This has been my biggest problem with Corsair's business model. When you look at Corsair's XMS3200C2 modules, they use the Winbond -6 grade memory chips. These are chips that Winbond has determine are only suitable for 166MHz = DDR333 operation. What Corsair, and other companies like them, do is take these -6 speed parts and run them through their own tests. If they work at DDR400, they mark them and sell them as DDR400 parts. The problem is that Winbond has determined that -6 parts are DDR333 parts for good reason. Even though they would love to put -6 parts in the -5 bin to get a higher profit, they can't do it with acceptable margin. Corsair is essentially remarking a part that has been overclocked and will thus have unacceptable margin. If you look closely at the literature, all the parts are tested with a single DIMM and pass before are badged with XMS3200, XMS3500, etc. The problem is that when a user sees a part that is DDR400 compliant, he/she doesn't realize that it's only really reliable for 1 DIMM. When you add multiple DIMMS, which most folks are doing for the current dual channel chipsets, you increase the loading on the bus and you start to see problems (the signal integrity is severely degraded via reflections and impedance mismatches). This is as expected because Corsair has not designed any acceptable margin into the module. It's a little bit deceptive marketing. This is not to single out Corsair. As a third party memory vendor, they offer other value added services such as excellent tech support and great warranty. My contention is with the deceptive marketing and the lack of margin that the modules contain. For example, if you follow Winbond's ratings, and XMS3500 is really a DDR400 and the XMS3200 is really a DDR333. Corsair should take the responsibility to mark them correctly. At the very least, they should test them with the maximum number of slots populated before declaring that a part is truly DDR400 complaint. [/B][/QUOTE] THIS man has the right idea....and that makes no one wrong. He addresses a business model. there is sense in a model he ascribes to Corsair, that's why folks use it... IS it best for the consumer??? Let the buyer beware. Some of you are already thinking I have stated that Corsair uses the model described above; I have not. Standards are established in part to reduce or eliminate problems. There is not 'accepted' standard beyound PC 3200. If you step beyound the standard, you're wandering in hobbit world. No problem there, except if you expect guarantees. And Corsair is good at guarantees. Look. Stock stuff ought to work without a lot of hassle. In fact it does. Step into over-stock and you do so at your own risk...Its a game of balance. What are you willing to risk to get what you think you really want. But..., in summation, back to the gentleman's point. I agree. I would prefer a more candid forthright approach, but this is not perfect land. Again, it is your job and mine to be informed. If you are not and get burned, it is the price of the education as Keith would day... Learn and move on.... thanks.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees
Well! First there are a few miss conceptions about speed grades -5 & -6 IC's in this case they are all exactly the same die, same IC. Usually just a speed grade based on location in the die process and physical inspection of the Die before it's packaged. And the speed grade used is based on JEDEC Spec's and we have never claimed our XMS Modules are JEDEC compliant. Only what we used to test them and the tested settings and MB we use. Please see [URL=http://www.houseofhelp.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=8048]XMS Qualification and Testing. [/URL] Some who purchase our memory expect more than what we say the modules will do and that’s where the problem comes in. Some will be able to run above our spec and some will not and I am sorry but we can only guarantee what we test. I do how ever see your points and I hope that you can see our position. And honestly there is no one in the industry that goes through the extremes we do in testing our modules. I know that because I test modules from everyone daily I know what's on the market and what they will do. And bottom line our module will run at the rated spec or we will replace them.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...