Jump to content
Corsair Community

Recommended Posts

So its been awhile since I build my last computer (7+ years) so I'm pretty excited about this. So without further delay...

 

Case: Corsair Vengeance Series C70

CPU: Intel Core i7 -3770K

Drive: Asus BluRay Burner

Hard Drive: Corsair Force Series GS 240 GB

Headset: Vengence 1500 Gaming Headset

Keyboard: Corsair Vengeance K90

Memory: G.Skill RipJaws X Series 16GB

Monitor: Sony 3D Display

Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK

Mouse: Corsair Vengeance M60

OS: Windows 8

Power Supply: Corsair HX750

Video Card: EVGA GTX660 Ti

2012-12-17_17-49-11_453.thumb.jpg.1ad42f5a4a03264758778d9299339e1d.jpg

2012-12-17_17-49-33_954.thumb.jpg.35995ca72c26fd16ea129af076a82099.jpg

2012-12-17_17-50-35_211.thumb.jpg.5cd38fde3acbefdab4d9ed7606022be9.jpg

2012-12-17_17-51-30_483.thumb.jpg.af3bbb719f51fc088954b26c6f75a5c2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice component selection - sweet build!

 

An idea - flip your PSU over to allow it to take cool air from the bottom, and it will allow for easier cable routing. Then invest in some zip ties or (even better) velcro tie wraps to gather and tuck your cables out of the way.

 

Congrats on your new rig!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So its been awhile since I build my last computer (7+ years) so I'm pretty excited about this. So without further delay...

 

Case: Corsair Vengeance Series C70

CPU: Intel Core i7 -3770K

Drive: Asus BluRay Burner

Hard Drive: Corsair Force Series GS 240 GB

Headset: Vengence 1500 Gaming Headset

Keyboard: Corsair Vengeance K90

Memory: G.Skill RipJaws X Series 16GB

Monitor: Sony 3D Display

Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK

Mouse: Corsair Vengeance M60

OS: Windows 8

Power Supply: Corsair HX750

Video Card: EVGA GTX660 Ti

 

Quick question. What is that blue box mounted vertically on the rear of your case?

 

How are you liking Windows 8? It has generated a lot of controversy on some websites.

 

x509

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but that would disperse the heat from the psu into the case and push against the fan from the video card

 

Before I go into an explanation, be assured that I have run my Corsair HX1000 in both fan up and fan down directions with a pair of EVGA GTX580s in SLI. My PSU is 250W higher than his, and I have twice the number of video cards - with each putting out more heat than his. There was no difference in GPU or motherboard chipset temps either way, at idle and under load... and this is crammed into a noticably smaller case than the C70. Trust me - it's pretty hot in there, even with the 6 case fans I've wedged inside! ;):

 

You can be sure that the interior of the PSU was running cooler with the fan down, though. OK, with that out of the way...

 

***

 

With the large fans (relative to the interior volume of the PSU housing) that come with modern PSUs, not much heat is radiated from the housing compared to all the other components inside of a PC.

 

The back of the PSU is vented, and the interior of the PSU is designed to function extremely well with cool air being drawn in from the bottom and exhausted out the rear vents outside the case. Likewise, they function just fine fan up - but they are, in fact getting warmer air drawn into them that way. It's not enough to cause a PSU to die earlier - unless your case has some serious interior heat issues!

 

So, there isn't a hard and fast rule to position the PSU either direction - but by far the greatest percentage of builds that have a PSU vent in the bottom of their case have them mounted fan down. That's why the vent is there. Some people that aren't into positive pressure airflow designs like to even out the pressure by having the PSU fan up to assist the rear case fan in exhausting warm air, but with a C70 you have so much ventilation on the front, side, bottom, top, and rear - it's not needed.

 

In fact - you could easily end up with negative pressure with a rear exhaust case fan, a rear exhaust video card design, and the PSU fan facing up - if you only had one or two front intake fans. Although there has never been a winner declared, there are those that argue for negative pressure setups vs positive, but negative pressure causes dust to be drawn in all openings in your case - because the pressure tries to equalize itself. At least with positive pressure (where you have loads of intake quantity vs less exhaust quantity measured in CFM) it causes the excess pressure to be blown out of the openings in your case - like all those vents on the C70, even the smaller unfiltered ones!

 

Strangely enough, bottom mounted PSU fans facing down don't add or subtract pressure from your design. They intake from outside the case and also exhaust outside the case, therefore remaining neutral. You could say that they contribute slightly towards positive pressure - because the volume of the neutral PSU housing is subtracted from the case interior - making it easier for intake fans to build up positive pressure because the box they are trying to fill is smaller.

 

If you are sitting your case directly on pile carpeting, you might not want fan down because of less airflow - but you'd be better of having a hard flat surface between the case and carpet at any rate. Mine is on a 12" x 22" section of butcher block.

 

Did you look at his intake fans - mounted to where they will be blowing across & underneath his GPU towards the rear vented expansion slots? The idea that warm air would rise from the PSU and be trapped there to heat up his GPU to any noticeable degree isn't valid - that "hot" air will be moving towards the back of the case because the front fans are blowing right through that area. He also has a ventilated side panel - in your scenario, warm air could escape out there as well as out the rear slots.

 

I could argue a different concept - that an upwards-facing PSU fan actually steals cooling air from the GPU intake fan coming from the front, but it's equally a moot point. Remember, some of these things sound important but when everything inside the case gets at least a little bit warm as it operates - these tiny changes aren't often measureable. For example - the bottom surface of the GPU gets plenty warm on its own, even if you had an older case design with the PSU mounted in the top of the case.

 

Since it will function just fine with the fan down, I was suggesting the flip also to put the non-modular bundle of cables towards the back wall of the case instead of close to the windowed side, where they are much harder to route properly - which will cause more interior heat problems than the PSU facing a different direction anyway. They block airflow through the entire case as they are now. Also - it can really suck if you drop a screw into a PSU with the fan facing up - especially if it's running... :eek:

 

 

BTW - apologies to the O.P. for interrupting his build thread with this - but perhaps he will find it interesting from a technical standpoint.

 

 

Quick question. What is that blue box mounted vertically on the rear of your case?

 

Should be the ballast for cold cathode lights, Mr. x509... :D:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice component selection - sweet build!

 

An idea - flip your PSU over to allow it to take cool air from the bottom, and it will allow for easier cable routing. Then invest in some zip ties or (even better) velcro tie wraps to gather and tuck your cables out of the way.

 

Congrats on your new rig!

 

Good idea, I might give that a try.

 

Quick question. What is that blue box mounted vertically on the rear of your case?

 

How are you liking Windows 8? It has generated a lot of controversy on some websites.

 

x509

 

I like it.

 

I've had zero issues with it, although I did install Classic Shell... :biggrin:

 

BTW - apologies to the O.P. for interrupting his build thread with this - but perhaps he will find it interesting from a technical standpoint.

 

Should be the ballast for cold cathode lights, Mr. x509... :D:

 

Thank you and correct!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...