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TX850 V2 Serious Issues


SeanOConnor

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Good day,

I recently purchased a TX850 V2 PSU from NewEgg, and for the first few weeks it performed flawlessly. Last week, my computer began to hard freeze when using 3D programs (Softimage especially). I thought it might be Windows 8 which I just installed a few weeks back, so I went back to Windows 7 two days ago. Still, my computer would hard freeze (infrequently, but definitely).

 

Today, it hard froze as usual, and I thought maybe it is time to clear the RAM. I shut it off, flipped the PSU switch in the back, and unplugged the power. After a few seconds, I plugged it back in and started my PC.

 

Now here is where it all falls apart. After switching it on, all of the fans started to whine and sound as if they were being pushed beyond their capacity. The whine continued to grow louder and it sounded as if my entire computer was being revved up like an engine. No image was shown onscreen. Fearing for my hardware, I shut it off. After a few seconds, I got up the courage to try again. For a few seconds, it sounded normal and it actually showed an image... but the image was distorted and garbled. Then, the revving started again, so I shut it off for good.

 

This PSU is brand new, and I have nearly two decades of computer building experience; I did all of my research and took every precaution. I fear the worst--my computer is my life with years upon years of work on it. However, if anyone has any suggestions, please let me know.

 

I need to know if this a known issue and only an RMA is neccessary, or if my $1200 worth of hardware is likely finished. The latter of which I am about to test with my old PSU (the one the TX850 replaced), I shall edit the post with the findings.

 

Any help is greatly appreciated, thank you.

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Now here is where it all falls apart. After switching it on, all of the fans started to whine and sound as if they were being pushed beyond their capacity. The whine continued to grow louder and it sounded as if my entire computer was being revved up like an engine. No image was shown onscreen. Fearing for my hardware, I shut it off. After a few seconds, I got up the courage to try again. For a few seconds, it sounded normal and it actually showed an image... but the image was distorted and garbled. Then, the revving started again, so I shut it off for good.

This sounds more like a bad GPU than it does a PSU. If you have on board graphics or another video card to test with i would try that first.

 

If not can you test with another PSU if you have a spare or can borrow one?

 

BTW what are the voltages being reported in your BIOS?

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Thank you for the reply. Since making the above post, I have been testing each component 1 by 1 on another machine. My GPU is intact, even being tested with Furmark. My disk drives are all intact as well thankfully. However, my motherboard is indeed fried. I tested it with my old PSU, the one that the TX850 replaced, and it refused to go to BIOS. Hence, I cannot check voltages. Unfortunately, my other machine does not support Core i7 or DDR3 RAM, so I cannot test those.

 

I am almost certain the cause is the TX850, as it is the only thing I have replaced since early 2011. Everything was working flawlessly up until now. Another reason is that I cannot imagine anything other than a PSU causing case fans (and all other fans for that matter) to speedup and make a lot of whining noise. It may have been just its own fan making all the noise, but it sure did not seem like it.

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I am almost certain the cause is the TX850, as it is the only thing I have replaced since early 2011. Everything was working flawlessly up until now. Another reason is that I cannot imagine anything other than a PSU causing case fans (and all other fans for that matter) to speedup and make a lot of whining noise. It may have been just its own fan making all the noise, but it sure did not seem like it.

Sorry about that! I missed the part about your case fans. I thought you said it was just your GPU fan going to 100%.

 

So now that leaves me a little confused. Please forgive me if i misunderstood.

 

You think the PSU took the MB out? You said it was fried, so have you tried the paperclip test on the PSU? Or is this two separate systems.

 

If you have a digital volt meter or even an older analog one, you jump start the PSU and read the voltages off of molex and SATA conectors.

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No worries, I suppose I was not exactly clear about which fans were whining, but it is indeed all of them.

 

I have done some final testing. The power supply did take out the motherboard, my processor, and all of the RAM. I have an old EVGA X58 board that has a shutdown error (which is why it was replaced) that I used to test them. Without a processor it would start and wait like it should. With the processor it would flash error codes on the onboard LED and restart.

 

However, while very unfortunate, I am counting my blessings that it did not take my GPU and hard drives too.

 

I worry about my PSU now. I am definitely going to RMA the thing, but I am not sure I want to put another TX850 in there. I know Corsair is quality, that is why I bought it, but this is just scary and potentially expensive.

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I have done some final testing. The power supply did take out the motherboard, my processor, and all of the RAM. I have an old EVGA X58 board that has a shutdown error (which is why it was replaced) that I used to test them. Without a processor it would start and wait like it should. With the processor it would flash error codes on the onboard LED and restart.

This is why i suggested to test the PSU above. It's very possible for the MB to fry and not have a thing to do with the PSU. Once power is supplied to the MB it is the MB's job to regulate those voltages. So if that failed the PSU could be totally inocent and intact.

 

Don't hget me wrong I know there is a possibility that this could have and has happened many times, just wondering how you came to the conclusion the PSU fried the MB.

 

Are there any wires on the PSU itself that are burnt or melted? If not i would seriously urge you to have it tested somewhere if you do not have a multimeter.

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Well my primary reason for blaming the PSU was the fact that it was my only new component in nearly two years. All of the other hardware was fine without any error, also none of it was overclocked.

 

I apologize for my previous post, for I left out one very important detail. All of this testing was performed with the old PSU. I am a bit reluctant to power up anything with the TX850 for fear of damage.

 

Unfortunately, I do not have a multimeter, but I will at least run some form of testing. No damage is visible on the PSU from the outside. I would open it to look inside but that would void my warranty. My best guess would be that the PSU was surging as opposed to failing. It seemed like things were getting too much power and running beyond capacity. I am not sure how to test for such things though.

 

EDIT: The PSU passed the paper clip test. It really does seem well built and I hate to place blame on it. Is there any way of testing if it is putting out the right levels of power? Interestingly, you said that the motherboard is responsible for regulating the voltages... does that mean that the board could take out the CPU and RAM if it failed?

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No need to apologize,WE are both working towards the same goal...figuring out what went wrong.:)

 

I apologize for my previous post, for I left out one very important detail. All of this testing was performed with the old PSU. I am a bit reluctant to power up anything with the TX850 for fear of damage.

You don't need to power up any system at all. Just use the paper cliptest found in the stickys on the main PSU page. It will be out of the system and not attached to anything but a couple of case fans so the PSU senses a load. It will not power up until it does. So if it wont fire up right away maybe attach another fan or two. But two should be sufficient.. You can find a decent multimeter for about 10 bucks anymore if you dont have one and measure the voltages through the wires in the molex and sata conectors. u can read 12, and 5v through the molex and 3.3v through the sata connector.

No damage is visible on the PSU from the outside. I would open it to look inside but that would void my warranty. My best guess would be that the PSU was surging as opposed to failing. It seemed like things were getting too much power and running beyond capacity. I am not sure how to test for such things though.

Again this would be MB, not PSU. Voltages shouldn't or really cant surge. Again if they are or were it's the MB that is responsible for regulatung voltages. The fact that it powers up with the paperclip really leads me to believe the Mb just went bad and why i really urge you to test the PSU before RMAing it.

 

This just doesn't sound like a bad PSU and I would hate to see you not only return a perfectly good PSu, but also be out the money for the shipping costs if it wasn't the problem to begin with. I could be totally wrog and the PSU is bad, just best to be sure.

 

RamGuy always says "lets convict it first before we hang it"

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Thank you for the continued replies. There has been a very interesting development. I was able to locate a multimeter in the garage. I followed a video tutorial, and the PSU is in fact perfect. Near flawless actually, it scored way better than the one in the video tutorial. It did have a few points above in some cases, usually .4 more... is that something to worry about?

 

Well now I must shift blame to the motherboard. 3 RMAs is bad news for the P6X58D, but for me the board has been really good. It has been under heavy use since December 2009. I still think the change in PSU triggered the board to malfunction, but the board should be able to handle a proper power stream.

 

You saved me a lot of hassle and shipping costs, thank you. Still though, I am left with a dead motherboard, CPU, and 12GB of RAM. I am looking at $600 at least to replace them all with only slightly better pieces. After what you said, I am tempted to go with an EVGA board again, even though my last one was faulty.

 

EDIT: The EVGA board I looked into received terrible reviews. The ASUS boards have decent reviews, but I am not sure.

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ATX specs are +/-5% for all voltages, Those are near perfect!

 

Well now I must shift blame to the motherboard. 3 RMAs is bad news for the P6X58D, but for me the board has been really good. It has been under heavy use since December 2009. I still think the change in PSU triggered the board to malfunction, but the board should be able to handle a proper power stream.

Yeah , I agree. And that was in the first 6 months i owned the board. This last one has been heavily overclocked 24/7 for almost three years now. So i really can't complain about it either.

 

I really think it was just a coincidence that it happened to you shortly after changing PSU's. If any of the voltage readings were real high or way out of spec i would agree with you. But unless the PSu was bad to begin with a PSU change just can't "trigger" a malfunction like this.

 

I've had numerous high value components go bad and it sucks and is hard to swallow sometimes, I just really believe it was just a fluke that it happened the way it did in your case.

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I see now that it must have been a bizarre coincidence. Up until now, I had no idea that a motherboard malfunction could take other components with it. Also, I have been quite fortunate and never had any failures of this magnitude before.

 

Unfortunately, there is no way around the expensive repair, so I might as well upgrade a bit. I was leaning toward this board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-131-821&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=3#scrollFullInfo

 

and this CPU:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116501

 

I really like the 5 year warranty on that board. I looked into the X79 socket 2011 chipset, but it just too new and expensive at the moment.

 

I really want to thank you for the support and saving me the headache of an unnecessary RMA. I figure, just to be sure, I will let the TX850 run on my faulty motherboard for awhile and see what happens.

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