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SSD partitions and cache


Virtualaughing

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Hello

 

I would like to know that can I use a single SSD with two partitions? A partition where the OS will be installed and an unallocated space to use as a cache drive for the rest of the content of my regular HDD.

 

Never had an SSD before so I have no experience with them. However gathered some info through the web.

The only reason is I have low budget so buying more than one SSD is out of question....

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i stopped partitioning drives when FAT32 was born. i lost way too much when 1 partition went spadoink and always wound up losing both. and that was on spinning drives when it "made sense" at the time.

to have a drive made up of just chips that depend on each other for even wear leveling and such it just does not make sense to me.

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well

Thanks for the replies.... However I'm still looking for the answer for... Can I use half of it as a place for the OS and another half for to smart cache the rest of the files for my regular HDDs?

Anyway

It is good to have partitions.

20-30 GB for the OS

Few hundred for the small files such as temporary, workplace, to move the default User's folder to other partition than the OS (a little trick with the registry) in case of unreversible windows crash.

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It is good to have partitions.

 

I think what you, and some other people, are failing to grasp is that partitions are a creature of mechanical hard drives. On an HDD, a partition had a physical presence. You could open up the drive and (more or less) point to where the partition was located on the physical disk.

 

An SSD is different. There is no physical analog to the idea of a logical partition. The partition is an abstract entity, separated from physical memory locations by one or more layers of logical pointers. While there's nothing stopping you from creating logical partitions, there's no real point to it. The data from one partition may be physically stored right next to data from another partition. They're separated only by logical mapping.

 

Likewise, on a HDD, you might crash a system on one partition but be able to rescue information on another, because they have separate logical structures in addition to separate physical locations. That's all out the window in an SSD. If you have a disk failure that causes loss of information in one partition, chances are that you've lost everything on that SSD right along with it. The structures that map physical data locations to logical locations (drive letter: directory tree) have nothing to do with the existence of partitions. As far as the SSD is concerned, a partition (drive letter) is essentially no different from just another directory name.

 

And while we're on the subject, the size of a partition (say a system partition of 100GB on a 256GB drive) means absolutely nothing. The SSD sees data coming across the wire and writes it to memory. It would write it to that same memory (let's say, just for purposes of illustration) whether the partition in which it's located is 100GB or 200GB. Makes no difference to the SSD. The partition is simply another piece of the hierarchical location of that particular data block. Thus, it makes Not One Bit of difference to the operation of the SSD whether you set your system partition to 80GB, 100GB, 120GB, etc. as long as it's large enough to hold what you want to store there.

 

So unless you want to put your sensitive information on a separate physical drive, you are wasting your time and effort messing with partitions.

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I think what you, and some other people, are failing to grasp is that partitions are a creature of mechanical hard drives. On an HDD, a partition had a physical presence. You could open up the drive and (more or less) point to where the partition was located on the physical disk.

 

An SSD is different. There is no physical analog to the idea of a logical partition. The partition is an abstract entity, separated from physical memory locations by one or more layers of logical pointers. While there's nothing stopping you from creating logical partitions, there's no real point to it. The data from one partition may be physically stored right next to data from another partition. They're separated only by logical mapping.

 

Likewise, on a HDD, you might crash a system on one partition but be able to rescue information on another, because they have separate logical structures in addition to separate physical locations. That's all out the window in an SSD. If you have a disk failure that causes loss of information in one partition, chances are that you've lost everything on that SSD right along with it. The structures that map physical data locations to logical locations (drive letter: directory tree) have nothing to do with the existence of partitions. As far as the SSD is concerned, a partition (drive letter) is essentially no different from just another directory name.

 

And while we're on the subject, the size of a partition (say a system partition of 100GB on a 256GB drive) means absolutely nothing. The SSD sees data coming across the wire and writes it to memory. It would write it to that same memory (let's say, just for purposes of illustration) whether the partition in which it's located is 100GB or 200GB. Makes no difference to the SSD. The partition is simply another piece of the hierarchical location of that particular data block. Thus, it makes Not One Bit of difference to the operation of the SSD whether you set your system partition to 80GB, 100GB, 120GB, etc. as long as it's large enough to hold what you want to store there.

 

So unless you want to put your sensitive information on a separate physical drive, you are wasting your time and effort messing with partitions.

 

Damn Son........ Made my head hurt esse...

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partitions on an SSD are NOT good, you cannot think like a spinning HDD, the technology is different. i mean do what you want, however if you lose your "precious data" you cannot say you were not advised against it.

 

Likewise, on a HDD, you might crash a system on one partition but be able to rescue information on another, because they have separate logical structures in addition to separate physical locations. That's all out the window in an SSD. If you have a disk failure that causes loss of information in one partition, chances are that you've lost everything on that SSD right along with it. The structures that map physical data locations to logical locations (drive letter: directory tree) have nothing to do with the existence of partitions. As far as the SSD is concerned, a partition (drive letter) is essentially no different from just another directory name.

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  • Corsair Employees

I would not suggest this just use a smaller dedicated drive for caching but our accelerator drive will only work with Windows 7 and only with one O.S. installed...

So I am not sure we have a solution for you; we would need to know more specific information to help you...

Re-Re Dito,

partitions on an SSD are NOT good, you cannot think like a spinning HDD, the technology is different. i mean do what you want, however if you lose your "precious data" you cannot say you were not advised against it.
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Thanks for all the replies. It was a poor man's attempted solution to solve 2 things with the same device.

 

If I understand correctly... I can not re-instal Windows on partition © without to lose the content of partition (D) if i decide to use SSD the same way as my HDD.

The another reason is why I would like to use partitions is, I have Win7 installation with moved default Users folder to partition (D) (other partition than the OS's) with a little trick in the registry.

"Same" Docsettings(XP)/Users(Win7) folder here since 2004. ofc it moved to different HHDs over the years but the folders/files are the same. :D

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