Jump to content
Corsair Community

Why do larger capacity USB drives have faster read/write?


brandon02852

Recommended Posts

I have no idea if this is just a scam to sell larger, more expensive drives...but I can't see ANY reason why a 32GB drive should read and write slower than a 64GB drive of the EXACT SAME TYPE.

 

Can anyone clarify this for me?

 

EDIT: This doesn't apply to just the USB drives, but also the SSD's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trying to explain it as simply as possible.

 

Think of the memory like a car park. The 32GB car park would have a single lane road accessing it and as such you can only get a certain amount of cars down the road at a time. When adding another 32GB car park they also add another road. This allows you to fill both car parks at the same time doubling the speed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did try to simplify the explanation as much as possible. Of course it could be 4 x 16GB car parks with 4 roads etc etc.

 

There is a limit as to how fast the car park can fill even with more roads and the car parks come in standard sized blocks. They could use faster higher grade car parks with a super efficient parking system or use more smaller car parks each with its own access road but obviously these things bump up the price. This is why you have the Voyager (Cheap and Cheerful) and the Voyager GT (Pricey but Faster).

 

There is always a trade off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Higher density flash devices (and SSDs also) have more NAND chips. The writes can be distributed across more chips simultaneously assuming of course that the controller can do this.

 

So, in post # 3 above, a 64GB device will have twice as many NAND chips as an equivalent 32GB device. The 64GB device won't be exactly 2X as fast but it will be faster for the reasons PriSoner gave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees

It is just the way it is; kind of like the difference between a Lexus and a Toyota. It's more expensive for the Lexus and once you drive you know understand the difference.

No, it isn't.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...