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H60 cooling problem


Zac_ZP

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Hello guys and girls,

 

this is my first post, few days ago i bought Corsair H60 cooling and installed it by instructions, i plugged in radiator fan into cpu fan (4-pin socket) and pump (3-pin socket) into NB fan on my motherboard, i tried few other fan sockets like sys fan, 1st fan, etc. but didn't help.

 

My processor core temp is around 40ish idle (core 2 duo e8400) and reaching 65C under pressure and with Box cooler it was reaching 68C max. Ambient temp in both cases was 22C in room.

 

Whats even stranger is that radiator is completely cold.

 

So i don't know if its something wrong with cooling or im doing something wrong? I could rly use some help.

 

Thanks in advance, here are some pics.

 

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/690/screenshotoc.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/825/photo1lz.jpg/

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You may have the socket 775 board issue we have seen quite a few times. That is, socket 775 boards tend to have components like capacitors or inductors very close to the CPU socket, and the H60's pump, being somewhat large, contacts those parts and causes poor contact between the CPU and the copper heat plate on the bottom of the pump.

 

The way to get around this is to remount the pump, turning it 90 degrees to the right or left. That will place the tubes coming out of the pump at the top or bottom, rather than the right side, as you look at it mounted on your mother board. So you must remove the pump to do this. When you do, check how the thermal paste imprint looks on the CPU and pump heat plate, it will likely have barely been compressed, or only on one side of the CPU.

 

All you need to do is remove the pump, clean off and reapply new thermal grease, and put the pump back on, but turned as I said. Try to see what parts on the board might be in the way, and turn the pump to avoid them.

 

Let us know how it goes.

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Thanks man, you made my day!

 

I did as you said and only like 10% of plate was touching procesor, i didn't even need to re-apply thermal paste, im actually quite impressed now how it cooled considering it was almost not even touching the CPU, it works like a charm now, 33 idle - 40 at max pressure.

 

Thanks once again :)

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You're welcome, your issue is quite common on socket 775 boards. One of the first PCs I built has a C2D E8400, which is quite a little workhorse CPU, and can be used in "embedded" applications according to Intel. That is, if some specialized professional or industrial equipment need an onboard computer or CPU, the E8400 or a slight variant of it was qualified to function in that role, which is considered more demanding and stressful than the typical home or office environment.

 

I was a bit surprised to see the E8400 is not considered "End of Life" by Intel (discontinued), since it will be four years old in the 4th quarter of 2012. That is "old" given the speed that Intel has introduced new processors over the last four or five years.

 

Your E8400 should run quite cool for you with a H60. Actually, although that is a modern CPU, in my experience it's thermal monitoring capabilities (reporting temperature data) are not that great until it hits about 35C/95F, and one core did not provide a temp below 35C. That might just be on my E8400, but if yours never reads lower, that is just the way they are.

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i didn't even need to re-apply thermal paste

 

I would strongly recommend cleaning off the original thermal compound and re-applying it. It just might result in the temp being a few degrees cooler. Due to oxidation the thermal compound my not be as effective.

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The pre-applied TIM on a H60 is not completely protected from oxidation when it is shipped from the factory. I doubt that oxidation is a factor to be concerned about, particularly due to the short time it was exposed to air.
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Its hitting 40C max in prime95 so paste will be fine for now, im planing to buy Ivy Bridge i5 when it hits the shelves anyway so ill re-apply it than, i just want to play abit with overclocking meanwhile.
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I doubt that oxidation is a factor to be concerned about, particularly due to the short time it was exposed to air.

I have to agree! It would take days or even weeks before you would get enough oxidation for it to be a concern. If it all even then. I've never seen that occur even with coolers and CPU that i have had sitting for years.

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Thanks P-Nutz.

 

Zac, usually you'd be told to reapply the TIM, but as you said your's was barely touched on the first installation, and you obviously were right and it works fine.

 

This does bring up a question I don't see discussed much, what is the lifespan of a TIM application? What causes it to deteriorate? Drying out is the main problem I guess, but putting a number on that is difficult. Think of all the TIM on chipset heatsinks that never gets changed, or on video cards, or on CPUs owned by many people. Is this an issue or not?

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