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nweissma

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suppose the pc's manual states that the max ddr3 ram speed is 1066MHz .. but Dell itself installs 1333MHz.

 

now, what are the consequences -- advantages and disadvantages -- of integrating 1333MHz CL9 versus 1066MHz CL7? why would i buy 1333MHz if it will automatically downclock to 1066MHz?

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Just because they install memory with a 1333 MHz label doesn't mean it's running at 1333 MHz. I'd check with CPU-Z.

 

You might buy 1333 MHz memory because it may be cheaper than 1066 MHz memory. The memory market changes on a dime.

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suppose the pc's manual states that the max ddr3 ram speed is 1066MHz .. but Dell itself installs 1333MHz.

Dell is good for making changes to their hardware but not updating manuals. It's possible they are indeed running at 1333mhz

 

Run cpu-z as Wired suggested. to see exactly what it's running at.

 

what are the consequences -- advantages and disadvantages -- of integrating 1333MHz CL9 versus 1066MHz CL7? why would i buy 1333MHz if it will automatically downclock to 1066MHz?

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Really no consequences to speak of. The 1333mhz memory may be slightly faster. But without a benchmark it is hard to tell.

 

Most modern memory defaults to 1066. Higher speeds usually require a BIOS tweak or two .

 

What system are you talking about. What i posted is pretty vague and covers most modern PC, but can be different depending on the manufacturer.

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Dell is good for making changes to their hardware but not updating manuals. It's possible they are indeed running at 1333mhz

[/Quote]

the DRAM frequency is between 533 and 538 -- i will interpret that to mean that it is operating at 1066MHz

 

 

 

Most modern memory defaults to 1066. Higher speeds usually require a BIOS tweak or two .
why does modern memory default to 1066?
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the DRAM frequency is between 533 and 538 -- i will interpret that to mean that it is operating at 1066MHz

Hmm, yes that would be 1066, but what do you mean it varies between 533 and 538? This value should be a fixed value.

 

Do you have two different sticks of memory in that machine?

 

why does modern memory default to 1066?
Usually memory defaults to a lower value to be sure the computer will be able to post. More or less just a failsafe setting. It is more of a MB/CPU sort of thing than it is memory.
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This value should be a fixed value.
well, it ain't!

 

Do you have two different sticks of memory in that machine?
1 x 2gb only

 

Usually memory defaults to a lower value to be sure the computer will be able to post. More or less just a failsafe setting. It is more of a MB/CPU sort of thing than it is memory.
yagotta' speak in terms that i understand: what is the connection between speed and whether post succeeds (certainly high speed memory successfully posts); explain your use of the word "failsafe"; after post succeeds, then why will the system not revert to its higher speed (say, 1333); "MB/CPU" means what?
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Some MB's based on early DDR3 chipsets would not support faster speeds and for us a memory manufacturer the slowest desktop module we make is DDR1333 and I would assume it is the same for most modules makers. Why produce module that is underrated only to work in a few systems when you can make a DDR1333 module that will work in a wider verity of systems and MB's? It is really that simple.

However, as peanutz94 suggested some MB and CPU Configurations may default to a slower speed IE DDR800 or DDR1066 and as such may offer the ability to set a higher setting in the BIOS setup, but most OEM systems would not allow this change and choose the slower setting for thermal and compatibility reasons.

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what is the connection between speed and whether post succeeds (certainly high speed memory successfully posts); explain your use of the word "failsafe"; after post succeeds, then why will the system not revert to its higher speed (say, 1333); "MB/CPU" means what?

When you first instal a new modules, your motherboard detects a new piece of hardware. Then it will go to POST. Power On Self Test.. The mother board will default to a low value to ensure that the computer will successfully start with the new hard ware. After that higher speeds must be set either with XMP(intels Extreme Memory Profile) or by setting them manually before they will run at that higher speed.

 

As RamGuy stated most OEM systems do not give you the options to adjust those values .

 

As far as faster memory goes , yes systems will definitely POST with faster memory , but they must be setup first. Once the changes are made and saved in the BIOS they will stay at that setting.

 

Without knowing what computer you have i'm not sure what the fastest memory you can run is. If it is only 1066 mhz, then to set them to run at 1333mhz would be overclocking. Again you would need access to bios settings that most OEMs do not let you use. Memory, motherboard and processor all work together. Processor determines the fastest memory you can run. But your motherboard must also support those speeds as well to work. And of course the memory has to be matched to both of those components.

 

"MB/CPU" means what?
Motherboard and CPU(processor)

 

At any rate i believe the answer to your original question is best described by RamGuy. It's all about making one stick that will work at a wide variety of computers instead of a choice few. Running a faster module at a lower speed does no harm.

 

 

I hope that helped some...

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some MB and CPU Configurations may default to a slower speed IE DDR800 or DDR1066
but when the mb/cpu forces the memory to a slower speed, there must be negative consequences because the memory's native timings were engineered to work at the higher speed; what might be these negative consequences -- performance; hardware longevity?

 

 

and as such may offer the ability to set a higher setting in the BIOS setup,

but most OEM systems would not allow this change and choose the slower setting for thermal and compatibility reasons.
silly noob question (still confused): why would i overclock when i can simply buy faster memory (why overclock 1066 when i can buy 1333); or maybe i'm asking the wrong question: are you saying that 1333 can be overclocked with lesser chance of negative overclocking consequences? btw, what are the negative consequences of overclocking - shortened mb/cpu/memory life?
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Performance obviously, but not longevity. Only by overvolting it would you actually damage it.

 

Overclocking is done for fun. Sure you can save money by getting a $50 part to run like a $500 part, but depending on how much you're into it you may spend more than the $500 part doing it. You can certainly damage your stuff by overvolting the memory, CPU, chipset, video card, etc. You could also damage it with a leaky watercooling setup.

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but when the mb/cpu forces the memory to a slower speed, there must be negative consequences because the memory's native timings were engineered to work at the higher speed; what might be these negative consequences -- performance; hardware longevity?

At slower speeds it's actually easier for the machine to run. Higher frequencies equals increased strain on the memory controller. It when you try to force them to run faster than what the MB?CPU will support is where it becomes an issue(overclocking)

 

silly noob question (still confused): why would i overclock when i can simply buy faster memory (why overclock 1066 when i can buy 1333);

Simply buying faster memory will not work. Your MB and CPU both have to support that faster memory. And thats where it gets tricky. Your motherboard has to have he ability to run faster memory and in addition to that, almost all modern CPU's have a maximum memory speed of 1333mhz. So any frequency higher than that would have to be achieved through overclocking. 1600mhz and above.

 

And as Wired stated when you overclock you may need to adjust certain system voltages and with that comes more heat and wear and tear. So overclocking can lead to CPU degradation over time. Usually those who do overclock are not really concerned with the possibility of a shorter component life span because the performance boost can far out weigh the negatives.

 

FWIW if you look at my sys profile i have my CPU overclocked to 4.5ghz, up from the 2.66mhz stock clocks. Thats a huge performance boost, nearly 40 percent. I've taken a 300$ CPU and have it running faster than the 1000$extreme CPU. It's been like this for almost two years now with no hiccups so to speak.

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