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TX650W part fell out? Still powers up.


vittu

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About 2 weeks ago when I powered on my PC after dusting it out I heard a noise like a fan was hitting something. I could not find what it was as I have about 5 fans in my system. I just assumed a cable was briefly in the way so I check all nearby cables and none of them seemed like they were cut. A few days ago after playing a game for a bit my computer would stall and freeze up. It sounded like the hard drives would power down and power up and I could not exit the screen without a restart. After further inspection I found the part in the attached image in the grill of the power supply fan.

 

Does that attached image look like something that belongs in my power supply? I have a TX650W, I've had it since 9/08.

part_in_psu_grill.jpg.a368558144d2cd90edaf175e65c3a97a.jpg

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Please use the link on the left and request an RMA and let me know the case number I will get it going right away.
Case number is 2745340, thanks RAM GUY.

 

 

Thanks for the info andyvee, I didn't know what to call it.

 

peanutz94, after using diode for a search keyword I found this thread you must have been referring to:

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=102256

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AHH HAAA! YES! Thats it! When i saw this

i know we had a member with a gecko stuck in the psu but a resistor falling out? thats a first ive seen.
I had to really think about it. Synthohol has been here forever and keeps a good eye on the forums so i thought it was just me imagining things... AGAIN! :)

Those two diodes are pretty much identical though.

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Yes a diode, a common part in any PS. That should have been soldered in place, and it's not possible for a diode or any other electronic component to get so hot it would melt the solder and fall out. It must have been making at least a partial connection for the PS to work.

 

It's possible for a loose, extra part to be in a PS, but since the PS no longer works, that is unlikely. Somehow that PS passed QC with a barely there connection on that diode, stuff happens... which is why Corsair wants to inspect the unit to discover what happened.

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and it's not possible for a diode or any other electronic component to get so hot it would melt the solder and fall out.

Sure can parsec! I have seen solder melt on more than one occasion. If you have a weak or a not so great connection at that joint , you'll get a high amount resistance and with that comes heat. :) A dead short will also melt solder in a heartbeat. It has a relatively low melting point. Usually 700-900deg. Some more, some less depending on the alloy. Anyway, it is possible

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Sure can parsec! I have seen solder melt on more than one occasion. If you have a weak or a not so great connection at that joint , you'll get a high amount resistance and with that comes heat. :) A dead short will also melt solder in a heartbeat. It has a relatively low melting point. Usually 700-900deg. Some more, some less depending on the alloy. Anyway, it is possible

 

That is surprising and I've never seen that. Particularly having the solder melt and the component remaining untouched by the heat. The solder that you mentioned, melting at about 800F degrees and used for brazing, is not electronics solder, which melts below 400F degrees, usually about 360F depending upon the composition. The new lead free solder melts at a higher temperature, about 430F. Electronics hobbyists don't like it, harder to work with and the extra heat ruins parts. Many electronic components could not stand temps above 500F for any length of time, and surface mount components would not survive that temperature. If there was a "cold" solder joint, as an improper solder connection is called, I guess I could see a short melting it. I wonder if PC PS circuit boards are all wave soldered, or if some hand soldering is done.

 

Regardless, very weird, I'd like to know what actually happened.

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The solder that you mentioned, melting at about 800F degrees and used for brazing, is not electronics solder, which melts below 400F degrees, usually about 360F depending upon the composition.

Yeah , i know. Thats why i said that some melted sooner and some at higher temps. To be honest i was just too lazy to look up the actual melting point. I knew electronics solder was lower.

 

But my kids race electric R/C cars and we've melted plenty of solder joints with high discharge battery packs. Long races create ALOT of heat . We have melted the power leads right off the motors many times. 7.2v at 30 amp discharge rate is alot of current. and alot of heat.

 

I wonder if PC PS circuit boards are all wave soldered, or if some hand soldering is done.

As far as i know they are all wave soldered at the factory and only hand soldered on repairs. Depending on the circuit board.

 

Regardless, very weird, I'd like to know what actually happened.

Yeah, me too. If anything just for curiosities sake. Something had to short somewhere

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