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Advanced PSU Testing


RickyR

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Found my system switched off one day - I always leave it running. Tried to switch it back on, nothing. No sound, no fans, no display on the monitors, no error messages, etc.

 

I assumed the Power Supply had gone bad. So I purchased a new one - a Corsair TX750.

 

Removed the HX1000, replaced it with the 750, and the system started right up. No problem at all. And I assumed that I must have been correct that the other PSU was bad.

 

I came to this Support Site intending on following up on Warranty, but discovered there was a "paperclip test". I performed the test, and found that the fan started up. Now I'm just not certain that my PSU is bad...

 

I was looking closely at the 24pin connector on the HX1000 and discovered that one of the orange wires at the end of the connector has turned "darkish" as it enters the connector. Could that be an indicator that a wire has gone bad? Is there an additional test I could run (other than paperclip) to determine if the PSU is bad or not?

 

The results of the "sniff test" reveal a burnt smell coming from inside the PSU, but I suspect that would be the same aroma you'd get from any PSU, good or bad...

 

Thanks,

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Seems like I read somewhere that even if the PSU passes the paperclip test, it still may not be able to power up a PC. At this point, I'm not sure if I should RMA the HX1000 or there is another way to test for functionality before I do so.

 

Perhaps the surest test is to use it in another build and see what happens - just thought there might be a simpler way...

 

Thanks,

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Google manual testing power supply with voltage tester.

Assuming that you have a voltage tester (if you don't, they're not expensive), you can then test voltages of of your various pins.

Orange is typically 3.3v (again google 24 pin ATX pinout), and is used for memory (been overclocking your RAM?), and I beleive SATA.

Could be that you have a bad 3.3 rail, which would mean that memory would create a POST problem. If that is true, the question remains - what caused that 3.3 to fry? If you have a component issue that caused that, then you may repeat the problem with the new PSU.

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