Jump to content
Corsair Community

Registry Cleaners


BrianTaylor

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I have gone a long way back on this section to see if there have been any threads on Registry Cleaners; specifically, to find out whether it is good practice to use commercial products for looking/cleaning for left overs, in the registry, when the operating system is on a SSD!

 

Currently, my operating system is on a Force Series 3 120 GB SATA 3 6Gb/s SSD!

 

I have installed PC Tools Performance Tool Kit 2011, which incorporates Registry Mechanic.

 

This program has worked satisfactorily on my old PC, with a conventional hard, drive, but I have been a bit reluctant to run it on my new PC, with the SSD; I have disabled the de-fragmentation facility.

 

Views and advice would be appreciated

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Given the high speed of an SSD drive and low search time, i really dont think cleaning the registry will change your speed...

 

I dont see how they could be bad, as they are giving you free space, but again, the drive is too fast for you to notice changes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I run a registry cleaner on all of my systems every six to eight months and on all of the systems I take in for repair, with and without SSD's. Windows has no real way of knowing if a registry entery is out of date if an updater has failed to remove the line. The updater may have removed the file the registry entry is pointing to but windows doesn't discover this until it finishes looking for it. Then it runs the next entry. If that's junk to; it continues. Eventually it finds the current entry pointing to the existing updated file. The program launches. Windows Update itself frequently doesn't clean up after itself. You get enough trash in the registry, speed starts to suffer big time, both in the time it takes to boot and the speed at which programs launch, including background applications and Windows services. It can also seriously diminish application performance speed wise as well. If Windows has to waste time in dead end searches it isn't any wonder. Usually, if I'm using one of the full strength cleaners, either CCleaner or Registry Mechanic, I'll set a System Restore point first then run the analyze tool, then check through the entries for any driver items I might not want removed, such as chipset, video, sound, or networking. I'll remove the checkmarks from those items before clicking on the clean button. Even if it turns out if those particular items are actually junk and you left them in there, it doesn't matter because you've cleaned out dozens or sometimes hundreds of entries that are crippling Windows performance. If you're not familiar with registry entries it's safer to use the milder registry cleaners in Glary Utilities or Advanced System Care, both have free versions available at Glarysoft and IOBit. Unless you're familiar with start up entries do not run the Startup Manager tool In Glary utilities, remove the checkmark for it from the one-click maintenance tab as well, it can give some folks serious headaches. All of the other cleanout tools in both are fine. Registry cleaners were far more problematic back in the late 1980's and early 90's than they are today. Most give you the option of making a backup of the registry before cleaning. Can't remember whether it was Registry Mechanic or System Mechanic that first introduced that feature. Oh wella, that's my opinion.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your comments; most grateful!

 

I have now picked up courage, and run my registry cleaner, and all appears well!

 

Garvin, I note your comment about creating a system restore point, but in my case, I have disabled System Restore (I believe this is recommended for SSD's); however, I have created an Acronis Image (Several) on a second hard drive!

 

My main concern. was whether using a Registry Cleaner, involved many write operations, which I understand is not good practice, with SSD's

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Setting System Restore points, making backups, imaging drives, and making a backup copy of the Registry all follow one of the golden rules: never do anything on a PC you can't back out of. I've configured System Restore to use 4% of the drives (2 Corsair SSD's in RAID0), down from the default of 12%. I use a secondary Rapter for caches and temp files. Which methods you choose is up to you. I understand the recomendation to disable System Restore with SSD's, just don't agree with it. Each memory cell has about a thousand "writes" life expectancy. Most drives have a bit of reserve capacity for when cells start failing that is transparent to the end user. Most data on a drive seldom moves once written; therefore you're not using up any write cycles. I just see a lot of worrying in forums over a drives life expectancy that to my mind is overblown, causing them to fear doing maintenance on their rigs needlessly. With regular maintenance, it's extremely rare that you'll ever need to reload the operating system and performance-wise, speed never diminishes. With my Corsair SSD's in RAID0, trim is useless, so every six months or so I'll defrag the free space on the drive with Perfect Disk (quick, somebody call 911, "Hello, PC police...") then boot to the BIOS and let it sit over night. After about an hour garbage collection kicks in. Two or three overnights and all of the SSD's speed is back. Then after all of the maintenance is done as a last step I'll run Windows Error Checking on the drive(s) with only the "Automatically fix file associations" check box checked. No point in running the surface scan option on an SSD drive (won't hurt you if accidently do, just uses up a bit of each cells lifespan). It never hurts to do backups of drives or images of drives as well, just in case.

 

As far as registry cleaners doing a lot of writes, most make a single backup copy, then analyze for errors, then write a single cleaned version that replaces the pre-existing version on the next reboot. The registry file-wise isn't very big because it's mainly just pointers to files and configuration settings. Compared to some of the files the pointers are pointing to the registry itself is miniscule. I prefer to think of SSD's with gigabytes of capacity and a thousand writes per cell as giant wells. Don't expect to have to start thinking about imaging the two drives in RAID0, even with regular maintenance, over to a brand new Corsair SSD or two until about the year 2025, maybe not even then.

 

ps: Perfect Disk and Diskeeper are full strength purchased defragging utilities. Both can defrag files the free defraggers never touch. They have slightly different optimization strategies, even with SSD's, which you prefer is up to you and seems to be partially dependent on what you mainly use the machine for. You don't absolutely need to have either one. Once I'm sure everything is running correctly on a new build, I'll run the optimization once. After that, only use the defrag free space method every six months before doing overnight garbage collection to reclaim speed on the SSD's. Ohhhhh, is that a squad car, sorry gotta run...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FolmrER,

Don't absolutely need to. Had a spare used 10K rpm Rapter drive sitting around collecting dust. Since temp and cache files are the most frequently written/rewritten, it only saves a bit of wear on the SSD's. I expect it to die long before the SSD's. When it dies, I'll probably throw in a small capacity SSD from Corsair in it's place. As far as the Corsair SSD's I have now: 30 months, zero problems. Except for some minor NVidia video driver incompatibilities I found with my multimedia players and chipset driver version awhile back, the system's kind of boring; it's still just as fast as the day I finished tweaking it in. What's the point of having a computer that doesn't have anything to fix on it. I'm kinda hoping for a corrupted update to be sent and automatically installed just to keep it interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hehe, aye, a fast, problem free PC is sorta lost its charm if you ask me. A great tool for getting the job done, nonetheless.

 

Was just curious as to the temp files because, honestly, the wear it induces on the SSD is negligible. And moving caches and temp files to a slower medium only really slows that part of the system down needlessly (and makes the scratching HDD noise I despise since having gotten an SSD :P).

 

And since you're doing all the things that actually justifies storing a lot of frequently changing/fragmenting data on the SSD, I just found it a bit odd :)

 

Anyway, thanks for your insight. I think I'll do some SSD defragmentation myself and let it idle afterwards, since analyzing my SSD really is bad for your eyes looking at all the fragmented blocks in the defragger. Not sure the speed will improve much from it considering my usage patterns, but what can I say - I like tweaking/optimizing ^^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"... the wear it induces on the SSD is negligible." True, but I didn't want to throw a perfectly fine Rapter out.

 

Ignore the fragmentation representation you're seeing, that only applies as a problem indicator for spinning platter drives. The map you're seeing seldom represents the true layout of the data within the SSD. Defragging the free space with a defragger capable of working with SSD drives allows subsequent software installations and updates to be layed down in continuous blocks, thus leaving smaller gaps between files. Defragging free space only helps with subsequent writes to the drive a small amount. It's a drive's garbage collection ability that has the biggest impact on speed by far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...