Jump to content
Corsair Community

H60 very high temps


Shinari

Recommended Posts

Just installed the H60, my first aftermarket cooler, and currently getting 71-80c core temp idle.

I was getting 56c core temp using stock cooler.

H60 radiator fan is being used as intake, plugged into the CPU_Fan

the pump is plugged into Sys_Fan

Used the thermal pad already on there instead of applying some thermal paste

I made sure the screws were tight on the pump

Followed all directions as closely as I could, except could not get my backplate off that came installed on the motherboard and just used the one already on there (could this be the issue?)

I also turned the radiator so the hose are towards the top of my case because if it faced downward, it would block the only PCI-e slot I have

The pump itself is rotated differently than I see it installed in the manual and in the tutorial video.

Not sure if its normal but im hearing some occasional sounds that sound like water moving?

Are any of the issues I listed the reason for my high temps? Or could it be something else I did wrong?

Thanks in advance for any help

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure that the water block is flush to the CPU surface and make sure that the water block is securely held in place with the mounting clip or clamp. You said that the fan is in an intake configuration? Does the mean you have the fan taking air from the outside and blowing into the case? This could be part of the issue as it will circulate warm/hot air inside the case heating up components and raising the ambient temperature. I'd recommend turning it around and configuring it as an outtake fan. I'd also mount the fan on the inside face of the radiator in the case causing the fan to force the air from the inside of the case over the radiator fins and out the back, or mounting a second fan for a push pull effect.

 

Just some suggestions.

 

Hope this helps. :):

 

-Lestat II

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure that the water block is flush to the CPU surface and make sure that the water block is securely held in place with the mounting clip or clamp. You said that the fan is in an intake configuration? Does the mean you have the fan taking air from the outside and blowing into the case? This could be part of the issue as it will circulate warm/hot air inside the case heating up components and raising the ambient temperature. I'd recommend turning it around and configuring it as an outtake fan. I'd also mount the fan on the inside face of the radiator in the case causing the fan to force the air from the inside of the case over the radiator fins and out the back, or mounting a second fan for a push pull effect.

 

Just some suggestions.

 

Hope this helps. :):

 

-Lestat II

The water block seems to be secure, it doesnt move when I try to push it or anything. I may try turning the fan, but I hear its fine taking air in. I was tempted to try push pull, but I'm not overclocking or anything (yet) so I think i'll save my money for now. Thanks for the suggestions though!

 

PS. nice Crono avatar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would check your bios and look at the CPU fan. It should be slightly above 4,000rpm in the bios reading. This will tell you if the pump is working. My h60 is nearly silent, so it's hard to tell if it's on without checking.

 

I can't check the fans in my bios because I have the stupid hp bios. Should I be getting the same readings in HWMonitor/SpeedFan? In SpeedFan I get around 1158-1500rpm for Fan1 and around 0-729 (at times its stuck on 0) for Fan 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only questionable thing about your installation I can see is the use of the HP backplate. But I think I see a problem with the pump speed.

 

The H60's pump should have a speed of ~4200 RPM. The reading you see of 729 RPM or less is very bad, if that is the pump. Yes, you should see the pump speed in either of those programs. It looks like the pump is not getting a full 12V, which it requires. You can try using a molex to three pin fan adapter, and connect the pump directly to your PS. I hope HP is using a normal PS with some molex connectors on it. Some boards have fan speed control on the SYS or Chassis fans, and if you cannot disable it (don't do that to the CPU/Radiator fan header) you must use the molex adapter.

 

If the pump speed is not the problem, the pump installation is next. Did you use the four threaded standoffs that came with your H60? Also, there should have been two types of standoffs (four of each) with your H60, one with two equally long threaded studs on them with the same size threads, and the other with one long and one short threaded studs, with the short studs having a larger diameter. Which of these did you use? Did the studs screw down to the point where the large area of the standoffs contacts the mother board? Or did you use some other parts from the HP PC?

 

Next, the relative position of the tubes coming out of the pump is not important. But, some mother boards have parts very close to the CPU socket, and the H60 pump will contact them and keep the copper heat plate on the bottom of the pump from having the correct pressure on the CPU. Although rare, that is a known cause of higher than normal temps with H-series coolers.

 

In your case, both of the things I mentioned need to be checked for a correct result. That is, what does the TIM imprint on the CPU and the pump's contact plate look like? Partial contact, a loose fit, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only questionable thing about your installation I can see is the use of the HP backplate. But I think I see a problem with the pump speed.

 

The H60's pump should have a speed of ~4200 RPM. The reading you see of 729 RPM or less is very bad, if that is the pump. Yes, you should see the pump speed in either of those programs. It looks like the pump is not getting a full 12V, which it requires. You can try using a molex to three pin fan adapter, and connect the pump directly to your PS. I hope HP is using a normal PS with some molex connectors on it. Some boards have fan speed control on the SYS or Chassis fans, and if you cannot disable it (don't do that to the CPU/Radiator fan header) you must use the molex adapter.

 

If the pump speed is not the problem, the pump installation is next. Did you use the four threaded standoffs that came with your H60? Also, there should have been two types of standoffs (four of each) with your H60, one with two equally long threaded studs on them with the same size threads, and the other with one long and one short threaded studs, with the short studs having a larger diameter. Which of these did you use? Did the studs screw down to the point where the large area of the standoffs contacts the mother board? Or did you use some other parts from the HP PC?

 

Next, the relative position of the tubes coming out of the pump is not important. But, some mother boards have parts very close to the CPU socket, and the H60 pump will contact them and keep the copper heat plate on the bottom of the pump from having the correct pressure on the CPU. Although rare, that is a known cause of higher than normal temps with H-series coolers.

 

In your case, both of the things I mentioned need to be checked for a correct result. That is, what does the TIM imprint on the CPU and the pump's contact plate look like? Partial contact, a loose fit, etc.

 

Would you happen to know if I could get 3pin fan to molex adapter locally (from staples or bestbuy or somewhere?) I'd like to be able to use my PC asap.. and I installed a 775w ******** PSU so I have plenty of molex conectors.

 

I used the thinner longer studs, they screwed down all the way.

I'll check the TIM imprint after I see if using the molex adapters help (if I can find any..)

 

Thanks for all the help!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The molex to three pin adapters are usually included with fans, most 120 or 140mm fans with include them. Any decent PC hardware store (BB not included... Staples?) should have them separately, is there a Microcenter, Tiger Direct/CompUSA, or Fry's near you? So you've never bought a PC fan? I have dozens of those adapters.

 

But working smart is better than just spending money. Check if your mother board has a fan connector called "Power" or "PWR", which should supply 12V constantly and not be affected by any fan speed control, and use it for the pump. If that Sys_Fan connector you are using now is not supplying 12V (it seems) something is keeping it at a lower level, unless it was hard wired that way by HP or whoever made the board. That is why I wonder if there are some settings for that in the BIOS. Does the BIOS have settings for the CPU fan speed?

 

If there really is nothing in your BIOS to set up fan speed control (might be under Power or Hardware Monitor, System, etc) you mentioned something that could work, SpeedFan. If you can figure out how to increase the "fan speed" to 100% on that fan (Sys_Fan) header with SpeedFan, you might be Ok. I say might, because given what I have seen, SpeedFan takes forever to get started (30 seconds+ after the desktop appears on a boot, running from a SSD with a quad core CPU :wtfeh: ) so the pump won't be up to speed until it gets going. If you don't shutdown and start up a lot, that won't matter to much, but your CPU won't be getting cooled well while booting. SpeedFan may not be able to control that fan header anyway, if HP gimped that board.

 

Do you have any old PCs around your house, or friends with PCs, maybe one of them a PC builder? Possible sources of the adapter. BTW, standard adapters won't let you monitor pump speed, a few have an extra wire and connector for that. Pump speed monitoring is not essential once you get it going right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, I ended up finding an adapter and it definitely was the pump not getting enough power, the pump actually sounds like its working now. I was hoping to see core temperatures around 30c when I booted up but....sadly I get around 56c, which was the temp of my stock cooler, i'm guessing it has to do with the backplate, so i'll check the TIM imprint and try the corsair backplate probably

 

Thanks for all your help again guys

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well after 3-4 hours of work, I got my backplate off and installed the corsair one. It was a bit loose, but after I put the pump on, it stopped wobbling. I used some AS5 and everything was ready to go, excited to see my new temps, I turned on my PC and...

56c again haha. Maybe my temperature reader is broken or something and doesnt go under 56c.....or something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your point about the CPU temp never reading below a certain value, while very unusual, is a possibility, given that your PC is made by HP. I have seen rather high temps that never change with Intel chipsets of the socket 775 era. Some Intel 4-series chipsets do not report a temp below ~50C. I've also seen some socket 775 CPUs (like yours) that don't report temps below a certain temp, but never as high as you are reporting, but who knows.

 

But that behavior may be due to the mother board chip that reads temp sensors from various components. That chip, or how it is set up on your HP board might explain that CPU temp.

 

Since the average all in one PC is not designed with PC enthusiasts in mind and most owners of those PCs don't monitor temps or have an interest in doing so, that capability is left out of those PCs. The manufacture also may not want the owner to be aware of the component temps.

 

You should try as many temp monitoring programs as possible. May I suggest HWiNFO (free) since it attempts to work with as many sensor chips as possible, and IMO it's display is less confusing than others are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...