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SSD & HDD working in tandum?


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I have searched the web and have nearly given up. With that said, here is my dilemma. I had a 300GB HDD crap out on my 3yr old ASUS ROG G50vt. I threw a 160GB in just to get it running again, but I will run out of space soon. I would like to incorporate a 120Gb SSD for my OS and a handful of programs, and install a 750GB in the second bay for everything else. I have looked at so many forums and posts about the best way to do this, and information is different everywhere I go. If that wasn't enough, I also read somewhere that a x64 system, like mine, won't support the OS on one drive and the user's folders on the other. There were a handful of RegEdit this and tweak that, but the information isn't consistent. Is not a possible accomplishment? Any ideas or information would prove invaluable. Thanks, Nate
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Hi Nate,

 

it's certainly possible. However, the easiest is probably to install on the SSD and use the HDD for data files (music, videos, other stuff) only, keeping the users' home directories on the default partition. Nothing keeps you from storing your files on a partition other than C:, right?

 

Cheers,

 

Smoerrebroed

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If that wasn't enough, I also read somewhere that a x64 system, like mine, won't support the OS on one drive and the user's folders on the other. There were a handful of RegEdit this and tweak that, but the information isn't consistent. Is not a possible accomplishment? Any ideas or information would prove invaluable. Thanks, Nate

There is no problem with doing this, you do not need to touch the registry, it will work. Windows will detect the hard drive and as long as the file system is compatible you can browse through...

 

I am using Win 7 64 bit home Premium and do have a second hard drive.

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Hi Nate,

 

it's certainly possible. However, the easiest is probably to install on the SSD and use the HDD for data files (music, videos, other stuff) only, keeping the users' home directories on the default partition. Nothing keeps you from storing your files on a partition other than C:, right?

 

Cheers,

 

Smoerrebroed

 

+1 for this suggestion.

 

For years now, I have always had multiple partitions in my system. These days, I have multiple drives, for improved access times.

 

I always use C: only for Windows and installed programs. And I never accept the default location for application data in something like My Documents.

 

I have a D: for data, and and E: for photos, music, etc. Plus an F: for disk-to-disk backup. So when I built an entirely new system last year, in a 700D case :D: I installed Win 7 on an empty drive. Then I simply moved the drives with D:, E:, and F: into the new case, cabled everything up, and I was up and running.

 

If you keep data and music and photos on different partitions if/when Windows gets hosed, you don't automatically lose your data.

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... If that wasn't enough, I also read somewhere that a x64 system, like mine, won't support the OS on one drive and the user's folders on the other. There were a handful of RegEdit this and tweak that, but the information isn't consistent. Is not a possible accomplishment? Any ideas or information would prove invaluable. Thanks, Nate

 

OMG what a bunch of nonsense! What difference would a SSD make, it is recognized by Windows like any other drive. So suddenly in 2011 or 2012, PCs only now may have multiple drives, and this is an exotic thing? Of course not.

 

Sure, there are some incredibly dumbed-down web sites out there, and some of the so-called PC review sites are nothing more than advertisements for products that are called reviews, with links to purchase the product all over the same page. You can't get decent advice from them.

 

Most of my PCs have run out of SATA ports with all the drives I have in them. Every one of them has a SSD as the OS drive, and multiple drives for storage, temporary usage, downloading, whatever. Some of my non-OS drives are SSDs too. No special set up is required to do this, besides the usual formatting and creating volumes/partitions on the drives. Yes, if ones idea of a file system is clicking on "My Documents", then multiple drives is strange, but come on, Windows is not going backwards, although sharing Windows 8 with desktop PCs and ever smaller whatever-books and even smart phones has me a bit concerned.

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An SSD + HDD configuration is a popular solution and pretty normal in today's desktops.

 

The OS is placed on the SSD for the overall high performance storage and the perceived "snappyness" and decreased loading times; the content (media, downloads, etc) on the HDD. This is because SSD's are much more expensive per GB than regular HDD's, so SSD+HDD offers a good compromize between speed and price when storing one's data.

 

It sounds like you're trying to "optimize" your configuration by spending a lot of time doing all sorts of tweaks like moving the Users folder to your HDD. This is not by any means necessary for the operation of the SSD or the OS. The only thing it accomplishes is saving space, and I do agree saving space is a valuable thing when dealing with SSDs. However, how much space will it save? 1-2GB? I do not consider that significant enough to warrent the time and effort, not to mention the fact that the operation is not supported by MS and was never meant to be done and as such has some degree of likelihood of screwing up to it.

 

Also, when you purposefully move often-accessed system data from a fast medium to a slower one, what are you in fact accomplishing by having a fast SSD in the first place?

 

Doing the hibernation file/pagefile/system restore changes along with always downloading files directly to your HDD (I believe all browsers EXCEPT Internet Explorer can do this) are the only SENSIBLE big things you can do for your SSD with regards to saving space for other performance sensitive stuff. Period.

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Are you trying to move the default folders into the second drive?

 

That is a good question and point. Does Windows require the user folders, etc, to be on the OS drive? That would explain the need for registry changes and other tweaks to allow that to function correctly. I've never done that, so really don't know.

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That is a good question and point. Does Windows require the user folders, etc, to be on the OS drive? That would explain the need for registry changes and other tweaks to allow that to function correctly. I've never done that, so really don't know.

 

Nope, Windows does not require the default folders on the OS drive. If you want to do that, All you need to do is change the location of the folder.

 

C:\Users\(User Name)\Right click any folder>Properties>Location> change C: to the secondary drive.

 

And if the secondary HD is removed. Windows will still boot up to the desktop, but a error message pops up saying "E:\Users\(username)\(Folder)" could not be found. Any application stored on the OS drive will still work (Firefox, Chrome, etc). Apart from applications that have data stored on the secondary drive.

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Nope, Windows does not require the default folders on the OS drive. If you want to do that, All you need to do is change the location of the folder.

 

C:\Users\(User Name)\Right click any folder>Properties>Location> change C: to the secondary drive.

 

And if the secondary HD is removed. Windows will still boot up to the desktop, but a error message pops up saying "E:\Users\(username)\(Folder)" could not be found. Any application stored on the OS drive will still work (Firefox, Chrome, etc). Apart from applications that have data stored on the secondary drive.

 

Actually all I want is that when I do a save from you-name-the-application, it opens up My Documents. And since I store all data on my D: drive, and music and photos on E:, and trial downloads on F:, it's a pain-in-the-mouse to do the extra clicks and selects.

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Actually all I want is that when I do a save from you-name-the-application, it opens up My Documents. And since I store all data on my D: drive, and music and photos on E:, and trial downloads on F:, it's a pain-in-the-mouse to do the extra clicks and selects.

 

Right click "Documents">Properties>Include a folder>(Your save folder)>Click "Include Folder" after selecting the folder>Right click that folder in "Library Locations:">Click "Set as default save location".

 

Now try it. It should direct you to the new save location.

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