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Force GT 240 GB vs Performance Pro 256 GB


Humbug

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I am having a hard time deciding between these two drives. It would be used as a boot drive and for MS Office, Email, gaming and a few other apps. I don't have any qualms about the sand-force controller as I believe it now is stable.

 

I understand that they are both fast although the Performance pro may be more consistent?

 

Also what would be really important to me is not how it performs out of the box but how it performs when it is 70% full and real world data for that is hard to come across.

 

Cheers

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Cool thanks- im guessing the applications I have mentioned would not be very write intensive?

 

Also when it comes to gaming and MS Office- am I correct in assuming we are dealing with compressible data- the strong point of the Force GT?

 

I had almost made up my mind about this drive until I heard about the performance pro and now it seems to me like the only reason the Force GT is fast is because of the compression it utilizes whereas the Performance Pro would be fast with any type of data. Also today I heard that Sandforce is not reliable with Z68 and the drives write throttle over time and cannot be reversed. Maybe I am digging so deep that I am inevitably finding the minority who have problems- I figured this would be the best place to ask.

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Also when it comes to gaming and MS Office- am I correct in assuming we are dealing with compressible data- the strong point of the Force GT?

 

OS & MS Office: compressible data

Movies, Music, Pictures: incompressible data

Textures etc. in games: incompressible data (look this thread, post #5)

 

You will find here a review about SSDs and gaming performance: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/battlefield-rift-ssd,3062.html

 

Long story short: SSDs seems to shorten loading times, but they won't affect the gaming performance in terms of frames per second.

 

I hope this information will help you to decide!

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Yeah I don't expect framerates to improve but apparently mechanical Hard Drives can cause the occasional microstutter when a read is needed, which an SSD eliminates...

 

Ok then how about long term- I don't expect my drives to last even five years as I would probably upgrade again by then. But how about two years from now- with TRIM in full swing will I still get the same performance as I do when it's one month old (with data)?

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TRIM and GC work very well and should keep your SSD's performance in shape. I'm using my Force 3 since 6 months now and the performance is like fresh out-of-the-box. However, if you notice a performance decrease, you can set your drive back to factory default and restore performance by SecureErasing your drive (will delete all data). You can read this blog post about SSD lifetime and performance.
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About Sandforce and Z68 not compatible:

That is not correct: my Asus m4e-z is running 3 sandforce ssd's with 0 errors last 2 months..

They are definitely compatible. What I heard is that there are a high rate of problems when paired together. e.g. post 4 in below thread says so

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/276737-32-octane-performance

 

Good to hear that you have no issues, it's also possible that people are imagining this simply because majority of enthusiast Intel builds sold today are Z68.

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Ok then how about long term- I don't expect my drives to last even five years as I would probably upgrade again by then. But how about two years from now- with TRIM in full swing will I still get the same performance as I do when it's one month old (with data)?

 

For long-term performance consistency, SandForce controllers typically win the argument. Their DuraClass technology will always provide you with out of the box speeds no matter how much you use the drive.

 

However, the Performance series are typically more stable on a higher variety of machines. If you do go with the Force GT make sure it works on your system and you don't have any crashes.

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^^Good to hear that the drives age well. Why is it then that people are so paranoid about writing to them and want to turn off any Windows features that do so?

 

I think most of the paranoia rooted from the original SSDs, they were very susceptible to these problems.

 

With better technology and especially TRIM, you don't have to worry about it anymore. The hardcore fanatics beg to differ but if you read my testing here:

 

http://www.corsair.com/blog/force-series-ssd-life-testing/

 

You can see that you can write quite a bit to the drive and the speeds never drop.

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Going from a 60Hz CRT monitor which makes your eyes bleed to a 100Hz LCD feels like a little taste of heaven. Getting greedy and buying a 120Hz LCD for an upgrade from the 100Hz one is pointless, as your eyes can only perceive so much (that is, no noticeable difference whatsoever).

 

That would be analogous to the current state of the consumer storage market, where going from a 5200RPM HDD to a latest-generation SSD is a slice of heaven right there, but "upgrading" to another latest-generation SSD (with, for example, another controller) is not noticeable.

 

Moral of the post: the performance difference of latest-gen SSDs when loading windows/apps/games/manipulating files is non-existant. The only deciding factors as a consumer should be price and space - nerding in benchmark scores is simply not good use of your time.

 

Disclaimer: Sure, if you KNOW you have specific needs for your workload (like video editing, handling alot of uncompressible data, especially writing), some choices are more obvious than others (Performance Pro), but then again you'd probably be better off buying a whole system tailored for that task instead of focusing exclusively on the storage subsystem.

 

If you're just looking for an SSD to speed up your system allround, any SSD will do. Corsair has great customer support and offers great latest-generation SSDs - you won't regret whichever product you choose from them :)

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FoLmEr, I agree with you- it's very difficult to tell the real world difference unless you carry a stopwatch around.

 

However in this case- I do have a choice of what to buy so I will look for the small performance differences even if they are not make or break. Also since thousands of people are already using these drives I am able to get an idea about which models are more likely statistically to cause problems with my setup. Most important of all for me learning about the various options and reading for hours is part of the fun of being a PC hardware enthusiast. The R&D is not a chore, if it was I could have just bought a gaming console.

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