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Freezing


adi1488

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Earlier my computer froze and when I restarted it failed to detect my RAID 0 array made up of 2 F60s. I've reset the computer a few times since and a couple times it detected the array but the computer froze again when windows started to boot up.

 

Is this what an SSD failure looks like and is there any chance of salvaging any data from the drives?

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It's not necessarily a SSD failure, hopefully just a glitch that some SandForce SSDs have occasionally.

 

Turn off the power to your PC completely, via it's switch or unplug it. Or open the PC and disconnect the SATA power connector from both SSDs, and check the data cable connections on both ends. Either way, let it sit for a minute, and then restore power, and attempt to boot your OS. You could just go to your BIOS and see if the SSDs are listed, or watch for the RAID configuration screen during POST. Repeat if it fails, and try different SATA data cables.

 

If they function and the PC boots, get your data off them as fast as possible, since if one is dead you won't be able to get data from the other due to the RAID configuration. That also applies to salvaging data.

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I'll try that even though it's kind of a long shot.

 

During the times when the RAID array is detected and Windows starts to boot up, I get the warning screen that Windows wasn't shut down properly and when I hit "Start windows normally" it freezes instantly. This makes me believe that the data is still readable on the drives but one of the SSD's cannot write new data and that crashes the windows booting process. Is this scenario possible? This would probably mean that some data may be corrupted since thee RAID array writes only half the data it's supposed to.

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It sounds like a possible scenario, but who knows what is really happening.

 

So you are seeing the IRST Option ROM RAID configuration screen during POST? If so, can you press Ctrl-I to enter that option? I haven't used that option enough to know if it has the same diagnostic checks that the Windows IRST program provides.

 

Your best bet is to put those drives on another IRST enabled PC, and try to access them after booting from another OS drive. You could run the IRST software in Windows on the other PC, and see what it says the status of those drives and RAID volume is. Connecting them to a non-IRST enabled PC will not help you retrieve data, and I don't know what the result of that would be.

 

Do you have a Windows Repair disk for that PC and OS installation? You could try booting from that and run a repair and see what happens.

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I have an Nvidia motherboard so I can't do those things. The RAID configuration utility doesn't have any diagnostic tools at all. All I know is that the RAID array is "healthy".

 

Right now all I have is a hard disk with Windows XP x64 installed and Windows XP can't run with RAID mode enabled (at least not straight out of the box like mine is). This means I couldn't access the data on the SSD's even if the drives worked.

 

I'll try to boot from a recovery disk and see if I can access the drives that way and save some data. Trying to repair Windows would be pointless.

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One of the best ways of trying to recover data from dodgy disks is to use a live linux cd. I always have a couple available. In most cases by booting with a live cd you can gain access to most windows drives and folders. This then lets you back up to a usb / optical etc. I tend to use Linux Mint as I find that this is usually the best at allowing me access to the windows drives. Please be careful and with proper use you can recover most of your data, assuming the disks are readable in the first place.
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One of the best ways of trying to recover data from dodgy disks is to use a live linux cd. I always have a couple available. In most cases by booting with a live cd you can gain access to most windows drives and folders. This then lets you back up to a usb / optical etc. I tend to use Linux Mint as I find that this is usually the best at allowing me access to the windows drives. Please be careful and with proper use you can recover most of your data, assuming the disks are readable in the first place.

 

That didn't work. Linux can't see the partition and Disk Utility didn't help either.

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