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First time build - H100 question on reseating and TIM


csbear

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Hello,

 

Sorry for the trivial question... I have just installed my new H100 and have booted up my PC only a handful of times to BIOS. Essentially the H100 has been used for maybe only 15-20mins of power cycling (not continually on, just power cycles with system on for few minutes at a time... CPU temps around 40). Now I need to remove the H100 and reseat it because I need to get to other components.

 

Do I have to put new TIM already or am I OK with just reseating the H100 without removing original TIM?

 

Thanks!

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Thank you peanutz94!

 

So I would remove the TIM from the H100 plate AND the CPU as well? I assume some of the TIM transfers to the CPU? I am not very familiar with the properties of thermal paste, so just wanted to make sure. :)

 

I plan to use ArcticClean 1 and 2 since I already have it with me.

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You need to clean off the tim from both the h100 and the cpu. I find it easier to clean the CPU out of the mobo. Becareful to not bend any CPU pins. I recommend spreading the new tim in an even thin layer. I use a razor blade but you can use a credit card too. You could also spread it with a rubber glove. Of course you can just put a small line in the middle of the CPU and allow the pressure of the CPU block to spread the tim.
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IIRC the H100 needs more than just a line of paste, there are a few posts about it and RG said something about using more paste than usual. you may want to either search it or wait til tomorrow for an official answer.

 

Which is why I recommend spreading an even thin layer. That guarantees the entire CPU is covered evenly.

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Personally, I don't find it necessary to remove the CPU to clean off the old TIM. Q-tips with a bit of alcohol on them are great for removing small amounts of TIM that found it's way off of the top of the CPU.

 

The contacts in the sockets of Intel CPUs are very delicate, and the more they are not exposed to potential damage, the better. Once those contacts are bent, the board is likely rendered worthless. The contacts in the socket are spec'd for only a dozen or so CPU insertions/removals, which is one spec that I do not ignore.

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Personally, I don't find it necessary to remove the CPU to clean off the old TIM. Q-tips with a bit of alcohol on them are great for removing small amounts of TIM that found it's way off of the top of the CPU.

 

The contacts in the sockets of Intel CPUs are very delicate, and the more they are not exposed to potential damage, the better. Once those contacts are bent, the board is likely rendered worthless. The contacts in the socket are spec'd for only a dozen or so CPU insertions/removals, which is one spec that I do not ignore.

I agre 100% Parsec. I dont pull the CPU out unless i absolutly have to. And applying TIM is not a " have to" situation. :D:

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That is actually great information regarding the CPU insertion/removal specs. I never knew that. The one component I am always worried about damaging is the CPU when it is removed. I was hoping that I wouldn't have to remove the CPU to clean the TIM, so I'll just use Qtips.

 

Thanks!

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csbear, I don't use Q-tips to clean the entire CPU, just for touch up purposes, and hard to reach areas. I use paper towels with alcohol for the first couple wipes, and then change to microfiber cloths, or something soft and as free of lint as possible. I also use that compressed air stuff to get any hairs and dust off before applying TIM. As for applying TIM, I won't go near that subject, there are several good methods that are also completely wrong... ya know? :cool:

 

It's really the contacts in the socket itself rather than the CPU itself that suffer wear and tear from multiple CPU insertions and removal, since Intel CPU's just use "lands" for the contact points. I can't recall the correct figure frankly, but it wasn't 50 or 25, so that is a ballpark figure, and may be typical Intel ultra-conservative.

 

OTOH, PC reviewers and OCing enthusiasts likely change CPUs more than most of us do, and I've never heard about problems with sockets "wearing out" because of that.

 

Yet again OTOH, I've seen pics of SB CPUs after they are mounted and removed, and the lands on the bottom of the CPU have tiny dents or indentations on them from the contacts in the socket. I've never heard about that before with other Intel CPUs, but it might be normal for the past generation or two, or just a SB thing. The dents might be an issue over time with many mounting and removal cycles.

 

I'm not big on swapping CPUs, and for some reason I don't kill mother boards, so once I mount a CPU, it's there to stay. OTOH, CPU coolers, fans, PSs, SSDs, HDDs, and even cases are things I'm always fooling around with.

 

"And applying TIM is not a " have to" situation."

 

Peanutz, ya lost me on that one, I don't get it... :confused:

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That is quite true if you are referring to the CPU you have in your PC specs, an AMD CPU. Intel CPUs and sockets are very different than the AMD CPU mounting system, virtually nothing in common. In one way, it's actually safer to remove an Intel CPU, since they have no contact pins on them whatsoever, and no worries about bending pins. The contacts in the socket are another story, easily damaged and no where near as strong as AMD CPU pins.

 

I really never said it was difficult to remove an Intel CPU, just unnecessary in this case IMO, but everyone has their own style of doing things.

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Ive had intel socket pins actually stick to the cpu when taking it out. Being very careful, then look down and 1 pin is pulled up. Then spent a few hours putting the pin back carefully with a toothpick, since the first try my third stick of ram wouldnt register, that was a great night. Also had AMD rigs that the slightest little touch to the heatsink and comp wouldnt boot until I reseated the cpu, real fun for someone who fiddles as much as I do.
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Ive had intel socket pins actually stick to the cpu when taking it out. Being very careful, then look down and 1 pin is pulled up. Then spent a few hours putting the pin back carefully with a toothpick, since the first try my third stick of ram wouldnt register, that was a great night

DOH *cringes* Been there , done that. ! I feel you pain! Whats worse is when your hands shake real bad as mine do and you wipe out two extra pins trying to fix one

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DOH *cringes* Been there , done that. ! I feel you pain! Whats worse is when your hands shake real bad as mine do and you wipe out two extra pins trying to fix one

 

:evil: yep sure sux ! Was my foxconn bloodrage and it wouldn't overclock at all after, not even .1ghz, but ran fine stock. So traded for a p6t se and crossflashed to p6t for sli :laughing:

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