Jump to content
Corsair Community

AX1200 passes paper clip test, otherwise dead


brec

Recommended Posts

Brand new system built from components, all hooked together today. "Nothing happens." As noted in title, the PSU fan spins when the "paper clip test" is applied but that's the only life I've seen.

 

The bad news is that I'm a software guy trying to build a system ("uh, electrons are yellow, right?"). Ideas welcome!

 

Edit: Posted on Friday evening, about 60 hours until Corsair Support opens on Monday, and this is an important project for me...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if the fan is spinning with that test than problem is your other hardware like MB socket pins or cpu not seated proper.

not a PSU issue.

Thanks; makes sense. I suspect I may have screwed up the CPU seating -- after pulling it a few of its pins are askew -- so I'm going to start over with a new CPU on Tuesday. Meanwhile, any particular MB socket pins at the top of the suspect list?

 

I realize I'm off-topic now that this is probably not a Corsair Support issue, but I figure there's got to be a lot of expertise here...

 

...

 

Oh, talking about off-topic... the Corsair site in describing the paper clip test provides instructions in terms of green and black wire insulation. But AX1200 cable's wires going into the connector are all black; I had to watch a YouTube video of the test using another brand PSU in order to get a fix on the right holes for the paper clip ends. In case anyone else needs the info: with the connector held with holes pointing up (so the paper clip ends would be inserted downward) and the lock tab side toward you, insert into the 4th hole from the right in the row that's toward you -- that's the "green wire" hole; and the 6th from the right in the same row -- that's one of the "black wire" holes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ATX 20 and 24 pin connector diagram:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATX

 

 

Double-check the connections from the case to the motherboard. If your off one pin left or right on the PWR connector, system doesn't boot. Be sure to plug in the 4-pin Cpu power connector. The correct cable on your supply has eight pins but is detachable into 4+4. Check to make sure the shape of the pins matches the shape of the holes on the connector that's located on the motherboard next to the Cpu past the voltage regulators (located on the opposite side from the RAM). When you initially start the system you should only have one stick of RAM in the motherboard manual dictated RAM slot for single stick installations, one video card in the motherboard manual dictated Pci-e slot for single video card installations, one hard drive, and one Optical drive (CD,DVD) hooked up. If the system successfully boots to the BIOS screen, enter the BIOS and set the BOOT order to boot from the Optical drive first, save and exit the BIOS, open the Optical drive up and insert the Windows Operating System disk. Close the drive. Use the Cases Power switch held in for four or five seconds to shut the system down. Make sure you don't have a network cable attached (you don't want Windows trying to update your motherboard chipset, video card, or audio drivers later in the Windows install process using the outdated drivers frequently found on the Windows Update site). Start the machine. Windows will start the Install process. Once Windows is fully installed off of the Install DVD, install the chipset drivers either off of the Motherboard support CD or use the latest version downloaded of the Motherboard Manufacturer's Support site (specific to your motherboard model) previously saved to a thumb drive or burned onto a CD. The downloaded versions are frequently compressed, so you'll need to extract them before installing them. Once this is done, reboot Windows. Now install your video drivers off the provided video card support CD. The driver installer will ask if you want to reboot Windows, say yes. Once you're back into Windows, reboot again. After you're fully back into Windows, install your audio drivers either off the motherboard support CD or using the latest version off of the Mothrboard Manufacturer's site. Reboot. Once Windows has fully loaded, go to Start then Shutdown. Hook up your network cable them start the machine. Now Windows will see the internet connection and Windows Update will want you to authenticate your copy of Windows and update the operating system. Usually takes two or three reboots to get everything updated. Once all of this is done, you can shut down and add RAM. Once you're sure the BIOS and Windows can see all of the RAM, shut down. Now you can start adding in video cards one at a time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, Garvin, thanks for all that info! I will definitely make the connections/cables checks, and (on Tuesday when my new CPU arrives) will take your advice and start with only one video card. I have only one RAM stick and one HDD. I have no optical drive -- I'm hoping to install Linux/Ubuntu 10.04 from a USB stick.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

... Be sure to plug in the 4-pin Cpu power connector. The correct cable on your supply has eight pins but is detachable into 4+4. Check to make sure the shape of the pins matches the shape of the holes on the connector that's located on the motherboard next to the Cpu past the voltage regulators (located on the opposite side from the RAM). ...
All I can find on my 890FXA-GD70 is an EIGHT-pin connector called out in the manual as "ATX 8-pin Power Connector: JPWR2" and shown to have four +12V pins on one side and four Ground on the other.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Strange, in the photograph of that motherboard on the MSI site dedicated to that board, it looks like a four pin connector on the board. If it's actually an eight pin on the motherboard, by all means plug in the full eight pin Cpu_power line from the power supply. Be sure all power lines from the supply are disconnected before you attempt to install the new cpu. Frankly, I'd remove the motherboard from the case and set it on a peice of cardboard, then install the Cpu, then install the Heatsink/Fan, install the fan connector to the cpu fan header, then install the motherboard back in the case. On a side note, before installing the new Cpu, you'll need to clean off the thermal paste/pad on the existing Cpu heatsink with a bit of alcohol (pharmacy rubbing, isopropyl, or ethel), then reapply a thin layer of thermal paste to top of the Cpu before attaching the Cpu's heatsink/fan combo. Virtually all Radio Shack's carry a small tube of Artic Silver 5 paste (Cpu thermal paste/Cpu thermal grease). If you forget to do this , you'll likely quickly burn out the new Cpu. Tutorial on how to apply thermal paste:

 

 

The only thing I'll do differently is use my finger inside a new plastic sandwitch baggy to spread the paste/grease instead of the business card. Either method works. Use a clean paper towel to dab off any excess overyhanging the top flat surface before setting the heatsink/fan combo on top. Secure the heatsink/fan combo. Make sure to look at it over to see if it looks like it's sitting flat on top of the Cpu.

 

ps: When you install the Cpu make sure the alignment marks line up before closing the latch on the Zero Insertion Force socket (see motherboard manual).

 

ps2: In general when installing any operating system, you'll want to start with the minimum amount of hardware first. After the operating system is installed then start adding in hardware, usually one at a time. (this rule doesn't always apply though, if I remember raeding right certain Unix setups dictate what needs to be there).

 

ps3: Oh yes, I forgot, you were correct, they orbit the brown protons and baby blue neutrons. Hardware/Software, Yin/Yang, one don't exist without the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's wrong with the thermal paste that comes on the heat sink/fan? Does AMD really sell products that are likely to burn out? This particular system should not stress the CPU in the software sense. And its an open "case", basically just a horizontal plastic platform. If it were outside, the CPU's fan could see the stars at night.

 

I'm not resisting out of laziness; I'm afraid there might be more risk in my screwing up replacing the delivered paste than in using the heat sink in stock condition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh by the way, you have already procured/downloaded the Linux drivers you're going to need in preparation for installing Linux/Ubunto haven't you?
I think the Linux/Ubuntu drivers that are built-in will suffice.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...