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TX750W V2, up side down ?


dagann

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Hello.

 

So my brother have bought a new computer, but it seems the psu was mounted up side down.

 

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e388/Dagann/alim.jpg

 

I have 2 questions :

 

1/ Does the fan of the psu breath in the air inside the case and blow it outside ?

Or does the fan of the psu breath in the air outside the case and blow it inside the case?

 

 

2/ Should he flip the psu so that its fan faces down the bottom of the case ? (There is a vent at the bottom vith a dust filter.)

Or should he leave it as it is, with the psu fan facing up the graphic card ?

Wich direction will dip the T° ?

 

Ty

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You can run it either way. I have a vent at the bottom of my case too and run it the same as your brothers. Mostly because i have LEDS in ine and like to see them visible.But if your case temps are fine it isn't going to hurt the PSU or hinder performance using air from inside the case. It basically your preference

 

Oh and yes the fan draws air in and exhausts it out the back.

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You can run it either way. I have a vent at the bottom of my case too and run it the same as your brothers. Mostly because i have LEDS in ine and like to see them visible.But if your case temps are fine it isn't going to hurt the PSU or hinder performance using air from inside the case. It basically your preference

 

Oh and yes the fan draws air in and exhausts it out the back.

 

i can add to that a little.. a while back, when i first bought my psu, i emailed corsair tech support asking which way around the psu should go, they told me it's fine to have it whichever way i preferred, as long as i had a vent at the bottom of the case.

 

 

i have mine fan facing down, and i also removed the dust filter to help increase airflow, oh and it's very worth mentioning that if you have the pc on say.. a thick carpet, either put a solid surface underneath it, or move it onto a table(you'd be suffocating the psu otherwise lol)

 

with regards to having it fan facing upwards, the only reason i'm against having my psu facing that way is because of my video card fan, in general the video card fan and psu fan would be fighting for the air circulating in that area of the case, this was the conclusion of a massive discussion i had on another forum a while back, and it's what sold me on mounting my psu fan facing downwards in the end :)

 

i hope that helps!

 

p.s peanutz, not trying to outsmart you i promise :)

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LOL, no worries. It wasn't taken that way. You basically just summed up what i said above and posted your own results. Thats what makes the things go around ya know! :)

 

exactly :) i have to have my psu fan facing down anyway, i have a rather nice custom made psu cover(i think i mentioned that in my first thread on here lol).

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Thx a lot guys.

So my brother can run its psu either way.

We will think about flipping it or not.

If the psu is facing down, its true the dust filter could lower the airflow. But if we remove the dust filter, i'm afraid the psu breath in the dust like a vaccum :)

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yes either way is fine :) if you do flip it over so the fan is facing downwards, don't worry too much about the extra dust from removing the dust filter, because ideally your brother should be keeping the pc clean every so often anyway, ideally with a can of compressed air ;) my psu has been cleaned once a month every month for the past year now, and i'd removed the dust filter from the get go, just for some extra peace of mind :)
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I'm firmly in the PS "upside down" camp, and no it's not upside down!! ;):

 

The bottom mount, bottom air intake PS mount is the current manner of PS mounting, and it is superior to other methods, IMO. The PS cools itself, and is not a fan for the rest of the case.

 

Talk about dust build up, with the PS pulling in case air, IMO it will have worse dust build up then if it just cools itself with outside air. Why? Consider the PS chassis as a miniature PC case. With one large fan pushing air into the small chassis of the PS, it becomes a positive pressure case. That configuration is always said to have less dust build up.

 

IMO, a PC case, even with multiple openings/vents, will be more difficult for a PS fan to pull air through than a PS with it's fan directly mounted above a grill/vent. Assuming that idea is correct, the difficulty the PS fan has pulling air through a case causes the positive pressure affect inside the PS chassis to be reduced or lost completely.

 

Did you ever see an older PC, with the PS used as a ventilation device for the PC? They are coated and caked with dust, I've seen ones where the fan can't spin anymore due to the build up of dust.

 

I'm certainly open to other arguments and thoughts on this topic, so please feel free to tell me I'm wrong...:flamethro

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I'm firmly in the PS "upside down" camp, and no it's not upside down!! ;):

 

The bottom mount, bottom air intake PS mount is the current manner of PS mounting, and it is superior to other methods, IMO. The PS cools itself, and is not a fan for the rest of the case.

 

Talk about dust build up, with the PS pulling in case air, IMO it will have worse dust build up then if it just cools itself with outside air. Why? Consider the PS chassis as a miniature PC case. With one large fan pushing air into the small chassis of the PS, it becomes a positive pressure case. That configuration is always said to have less dust build up.

 

IMO, a PC case, even with multiple openings/vents, will be more difficult for a PS fan to pull air through than a PS with it's fan directly mounted above a grill/vent. Assuming that idea is correct, the difficulty the PS fan has pulling air through a case causes the positive pressure affect inside the PS chassis to be reduced or lost completely.

 

Did you ever see an older PC, with the PS used as a ventilation device for the PC? They are coated and caked with dust, I've seen ones where the fan can't spin anymore due to the build up of dust.

 

I'm certainly open to other arguments and thoughts on this topic, so please feel free to tell me I'm wrong...:flamethro

 

i agree with you 110% :) what you've just said was a massive part of the discussion i had on another forum about deciding which way i should mount my psu(the case i have now happens to be the first case i've had with a bottom mounted psu config lol), it also played a massive part in my decision to have my psu mounted fan facing down, one thing nobody here mentioned yet is the labels on either side of the psu, no matter which way the psu is mounted you'll have the label facing the right way up towards you, and the label at the motherboard side will be upside down, i think we all know why this is so ;) but the bottom line is, as far as warranty etc is concerned, it really doesnt matter which way around the psu is mounted, but from a practical perspective, if the case the psu is mounted in has a vent at the bottom, then mount it fan facing down, if it does not(like a certain popular gamers case a friend of mine has) then either get a dremel and cut yourself a fan sized grill down there, or mount it fan facing upwards, simples! :eyebuldge

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Talk about dust build up, with the PS pulling in case air, IMO it will have worse dust build up then if it just cools itself with outside air. Why?

My thinking is that with the fan facing up inside the case it is creating a "vaccumme " in the case that would actually pull more dust in. As opposed to a positive pressure case set up. But who knows, im told my thinking is wrong all the time...Just ask my wife. she'll tell ya!:roll:

the bottom line is, as far as warranty etc is concerned, it really doesnt matter which way around the psu is mounted, but from a practical perspective, if the case the psu is mounted in has a vent at the bottom, then mount it fan facing down, if it does not(like a certain popular gamers case a friend of mine has) then either get a dremel and cut yourself a fan sized grill down there, or mount it fan facing upwards, simples!

EXACTLY! ;):

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My thinking is that with the fan facing up inside the case it is creating a "vaccumme " in the case that would actually pull more dust in. As opposed to a positive pressure case set up. But who knows, im told my thinking is wrong all the time...Just ask my wife. she'll tell ya!:roll:

 

 

Not all women are technical minded heh, but me on the other hand, i grew up swimming in technical stuff, so i wouldn't say you're wrong at all :p: i have a very humble attitude though, i always have the mindset that even if i do know my stuff, there's always going to be someone somewhere that knows more than i do, so i can't stand know it alls that think they're right 100% of the time and that they're smarter than every person they meet! :biggrin:

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My thinking is that with the fan facing up inside the case it is creating a "vaccumme " in the case that would actually pull more dust in. As opposed to a positive pressure case set up. But who knows, im told my thinking is wrong all the time...Just ask my wife. she'll tell ya!:roll:

 

EXACTLY! ;):

 

And this from a person that said he has the PS fan facing up in his case! ;): Nothing like shooting down your own setup! ;):

 

But thanks for backing me up, since if the PS fan is pulling in air from the case, it does not matter where it is in the case. Actually, it may be worse on the bottom of the case, since the embryonic dust bunnys, which are larger than plain old dust particles, will be pulled down by gravity more so against any flow of air out at the top of the case.

 

AliasOf...Yourself, thanks for your comment. I must say that the notion of a PS chassis and it's fan being an example of a positive pressure case just came to me while reading this thread, and while it seems like it might have merit, I'm not entirely sure.

 

I do know I don't like the idea of using my PS as a ventilation device for my PC. That's what fans are for. The PS has enough class to bring it's own fan to work, so the dang case can take care of itself!

 

But then I have the (almost) ultimate solution for this issue. My new PS has a fan system that only runs when the PS reaches a certain temperature, at about 1/3 of it's rated output. Most of the time, it does not run at all. A fan-less PS of course will not force feed itself dust ever, so that is the ultimate solution!

 

Or you can always do what one guy did that posted in the PS forum, stick a pencil through the fan vent of your PS while it is on, to stop the fan from spinning... I kid you not, right Peanutz?

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And this from a person that said he has the PS fan facing up in his case! Nothing like shooting down your own setup!

I'll admit, my rig sucks dust in like you wouldn't believe. You just cant put enough dust filters on without completely choking off the air supply when you have kids and pets. I have to clean it out monthly. And then a complete tear down and clean every six months or so. Thank god for the 200gal air compressor i salvaged from one of the local steel mills!:D:

Or you can always do what one guy did that posted in the PS forum, stick a pencil through the fan vent of your PS while it is on, to stop the fan from spinning... I kid you not, right Peanutz?

And then complained of poor quality because the fan broke. It just makes you really think about some people.

But then I have the (almost) ultimate solution for this issue. My new PS has a fan system that only runs when the PS reaches a certain temperature, at about 1/3 of it's rated output. Most of the time, it does not run at all. A fan-less PS of course will not force feed itself dust ever, so that is the ultimate solution!

I believe that as technology progresses you will see totally fan-less PSU's in the near future that will be the norm. There are already some on the market but not quite enough Wattage for high end rigs or being outrageously expensive.

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Yes, dust happens, and never stops happening. It seems to me that large PC cases, with good air flow, even if not positive pressure, have less dust accumulation.

 

Peanutz, now that's a good way to get that fine layer of dust off a mother board that seems to hang on regardless of what you do, a big compressor. Watch out for flying capacitors and chips, with gale force pressure. ;):

 

I believe that one fanless PS of ~400 Watts capacity is a modified ~800 Watt model, with added chassis ventilation, and the fan removed. It's one of their top models, so yes, very pricey.

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Peanutz, now that's a good way to get that fine layer of dust off a mother board that seems to hang on regardless of what you do, a big compressor. Watch out for flying capacitors and chips, with gale force pressure.

Now c'mon Parsec! You really think i would do something like that. I was(was, i had to retire now) a pipefitter for about 20 years in the steel mills. So i had really good access to all sorts of machinery. So i would never be caught dead blowing out my rig without a good regulator to drop the pressure and a really good dryer so i don't get moisture in the lines. Thats also where i acquired alot of my knowledge for computers. I have some really good electrician friends who taught me. So it was a beneficial job in more than one way! :)

 

Just found this . I gess you can go 180 deg in the other direction. From fanless to water cooled.....HERE

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Peanutz, of course I know you would not do that, I just want to borrow that compressor! When you said 200psi, I was thinking, "What is the spec for air pressure resistance of components soldered to a board". I'm sure we'd get a quick and clear response from mother board companies, right? :confused:

 

OMG, that PS is wild! I saw something vaguely similar a while back, the PS was sealed and contained some kind of fluid that almost filled the PS chassis, and might have had a separate fan. Wait... here it is, the older version (?) of the one you linked to: http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story&reid=48

 

Uhm, sorry guys, not interested... :ummmm:

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Peanutz, of course I know you would not do that, I just want to borrow that compressor! When you said 200psi, I was thinking, "What is the spec for air pressure resistance of components soldered to a board". I'm sure we'd get a quick and clear response from mother board companies, right?

Parsec, if it didn't take a small flatbed truck to move i would let you. It's 200gallon capacity. Not 200PSI. So it's basically just a little smaller than 4 55 gal drums welded together. It weighs in at about the 1000lb mark(should put it on a diet). The compressor still only puts out about 125 psi, which is about standard for most compressors.

 

I used to do alot of tinkering with cars, and you can never have enough volume when running air tools:)

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