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AX1200W clicks then no power


robump

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Hi Everyone,

 

I have a problem with my AX1200, when i power on the motherboard the power supply just clicks and then nothing happens. I have RMAed my motherboard and received it back as no problems were found so I think it is the power supply or me doing something wrong.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks again,

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sounds like there may be some short. try setting it up outside the case if you can.

 

Thanks for the reply, i was testing it outside the case on the motherboard box so i dont think it shorted in the case, i also took out all the components but the cpu and 1 stick of ram?

 

Where else could the short be?

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I'd double-check to see if the alignment mark on the cpu matches the alignment mark on the ZIFF socket. If it's installed wrong a power supply will just click when you fire the system up, waiting for a response that it will never get. Until it gets that response it will not allow full power to the board. Check the photos in the motherboard manual to be sure that the mark you think is the alignment mark is the alignment mark.
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What slot are you plugging the RAM into, usually the motherboard manual has a recommendation for installing a single stick and usually it's near the cpu (first or second slot). You forgot to fill out your system specs so I couldn't look it up for you. On a lot of boards one needs to follow the board manual's recommendation in regards to RAM placement or the memory controller won't find the RAM. If the board doesn't have onboard video, you'll need a video card plugged in as well.
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Well, I took another look at your video and didn't notice either an anti-static or non-conductive pad underneath the board laying on the table. Some tabletops can conduct enough electricity to short the board (they can also short a cpu if one makes the mistake of laying the cpu pins down on the table). Usually a piece of cardboard works just fine as a non-conductive pad. A badly shorted stick of RAM can also cause what you're seeing. It's highly unlikely you'd have four shorted sticks so try several of the sticks one at a time in the motherboard manual designated slot when using only one stick. Occasionally when dealing with whopper power supplies and certain combinations of motherboards, a minimum amount of load needs to be present for the system to boot. That gtx 480 plugged in is more than sufficient to meet minimum load. If the system still doesn't boot after trying these suggestion, then I'd have to say you either have a bad supply or a bad cpu, RMA time.
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Thanks for the advice! I have tried changing round all the ram in the different slots and still noting, i put the whole board on a piece of cardboard and it still shorts!!

 

How are you to test a cpu?

 

Thanks

 

Well, I took another look at your video and didn't notice either an anti-static or non-conductive pad underneath the board laying on the table. Some tabletops can conduct enough electricity to short the board (they can also short a cpu if one makes the mistake of laying the cpu pins down on the table). Usually a piece of cardboard works just fine as a non-conductive pad. A badly shorted stick of RAM can also cause what you're seeing. It's highly unlikely you'd have four shorted sticks so try several of the sticks one at a time in the motherboard manual designated slot when using only one stick. Occasionally when dealing with whopper power supplies and certain combinations of motherboards, a minimum amount of load needs to be present for the system to boot. That gtx 480 plugged in is more than sufficient to meet minimum load. If the system still doesn't boot after trying these suggestion, then I'd have to say you either have a bad supply or a bad cpu, RMA time.
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Just a thought

 

I had a similar problem with another psu ...turned out that the actual problem wasnt the psu BUT the power on button. It was getting stack when i pressed it and did a reset almost immediately. Do you have an extra pwr button to test?

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I have tried it with another power switch and it still does the same! Would this occur if the cpu was broken?

 

Have you tried the paperclip trick. If the psu works that way then theres something else wrong (see the stickies for how to do it).

 

On another note i would try to update mobo bios with the latest (get another psu to operate it)

 

Are you sure the pwr button is in the pwr slot and not in reset? (if yes try putiing it so the letter face away from cpu)

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Yep, he's already RMA'd the motherboard, they didn't find anything wrong with it. He could run the paper clip test on the AX1200, but that test won't tell him if he has a "power good" signal from the supply that's within the window of tolerance for that signal to get back to the board. If it's late the system shuts down. Watching the video it appears he's hung either at the "power good" signal return or immediately after that when the BIOS chip checks the cpu for correct installation and shorts/opens. If it finds a problem with the cpu, it goes into emergency shutdown mode and does not tell the supply to start passing full power on all rails. It's on for too long to be a stuck power switch or the power switch leads to be connected one pin off (if your one pin off the other way the system won't try to start at all). When those conditions exist all you get is a brief flash and a slight powerup of the cpu fan. Unfortunately, the only easy way to check for a bad cpu is to plug it into another compatible board. If he could borrow a supply of sufficient wattage and 12volt amperage (minimum 600watt, 42 amp for the gtx480), then he could rule out either the cpu or the AX1200 as the culprit by merely plugging it in to test. If it powers up on the borrowed supply, it means the AX1200 is probably out of tolarance on the "power good" signal. If it doesn't power up while using the borrowed supply, it means his cpu is probably bad.
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Yep, he's already RMA'd the motherboard, they didn't find anything wrong with it. He could run the paper clip test on the AX1200, but that test won't tell him if he has a "power good" signal from the supply that's within the window of tolerance for that signal to get back to the board. If it's late the system shuts down. Watching the video it appears he's hung either at the "power good" signal return or immediately after that when the BIOS chip checks the cpu for correct installation and shorts/opens. If it finds a problem with the cpu, it goes into emergency shutdown mode and does not tell the supply to start passing full power on all rails. It's on for too long to be a stuck power switch or the power switch leads to be connected one pin off (if your one pin off the other way the system won't try to start at all). When those conditions exist all you get is a brief flash and a slight powerup of the cpu fan. Unfortunately, the only easy way to check for a bad cpu is to plug it into another compatible board. If he could borrow a supply of sufficient wattage and 12volt amperage (minimum 600watt, 42 amp for the gtx480), then he could rule out either the cpu or the AX1200 as the culprit by merely plugging it in to test. If it powers up on the borrowed supply, it means the AX1200 is probably out of tolarance on the "power good" signal. If it doesn't power up while using the borrowed supply, it means his cpu is probably bad.

 

Thanks for your help, so i need to get hold of another PSU to test this and we will then know if its the CPU or the power supply.

 

Thanks again for your continued help.

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  • 1 month later...

Just an update on this, i havent managed to get a different psu to try yet but i have put my ax1200 on a power supply tester and the power supply tester says the -12v reading is at 12.9. Could this indicate an issue or not?

 

Thanks

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Not necessarily,Although that reading is a little high, Ram Guy stated i another thread that some PSU testers may not read correctly because of the components used inn their PSU's. Is there any way you can test with a multimeter to get a true voltage reading?
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Ok i have a new CPU arriving tomorrow, but i am a little apprehensive to try it, there is no way that this PSU can blow a new cpu is there?

 

If the clicking still exists then the issue is defiantly the PSU, am i right?

 

Thanks again for your continued help!

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