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CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 on Asus P5G41T-M LX3


a1newman

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I purchased a system that has had many BSODs in which it was suggested that memory was an issue. The seller believes it is software or hardware driver issues although he has provided no substance for his belief. I ran memtest86+ on this system with 8GB RAM (2 CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 on motherboard Asus P5G41T-M LX3) and got many errors. If I understand the output from memtest86+, this jpg attachment shows over 96,000 errors. Am I reading that correctly? If so, that seems very high and I wonder whether individual testing will identify only one issue?

 

In reading about memtest86+ I read the following:

According to http://forum.canardpc.com/threads/28864-FAQ-please-read-before-posting the first step is to

"First verify that the BIOS settings of your machine are correctly configured. Look up the memory timing settings applicable to the brand and type of memory modules you have and check they match your BIOS settings, correct them if they don't and run memtest again"

I then noted the memory timing differences as seen in the attached CPU-Z output and wondered whether that indicated an issue that needed addressing before doing any separate testing of the RAM by slot. I contacted the seller and his responses included "If there is a hardware conflict, memtest86 can and will generate errors." and "The memory timings and speed are correct for that board and the BIOS. It is good RAM." Is the seller right that hardware conflicts can generate errors? If so, how do you test that effectively? As to his second statement, my impression based on a similar ASUS board on the thread "CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 on an Asus P5G41T-M / CSM - Single Channel works, Dual doesn't" on this site is that he is wrong.

 

I looked at the BIOS and being the neophyte that I am, I could not determine the area where I can change what appeared to be automatic settings in almost all areas. Thus I am looking to understand if there is a place within the BIOS I should be doing something to get the timings to match what the SPD in CPU-Z says are the four choices. Please advise how best to do this if I need to. My impression is that once I fix the BIOS and later reboot with the CD containing memtest86+, I should see fewer or no errors.

 

Thank you very much for reading all of this and helping out this neophyte.

104510650_IMG_1477(800x600).jpg.c47c65d93fbe85c84b0110f45bb7e0b5.jpg

CPU-Z memory info.pdf

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A quick update on the memtest86+. I had a third drive in the computer when I ran the test originally and have since removed it and am running the test now with the first pass showing as clean. I will update tomorrow as to what happens after many more passes.

 

I wrote too soon as errors are now up to 831 at test 4 of the second pass with 5 of the 9 errors displayed showing Err-Bits of 00200000 and the other 4 with 00010000.

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"First verify that the BIOS settings of your machine are correctly configured. Look up the memory timing settings applicable to the brand and type of memory modules you have and check they match your BIOS settings, correct them if they don't and run memtest again"

Did you manually set the timings in your BIOS before running Memtest? And save the settings? I know its a pretty obvious question, but i have to ask.

 

I then noted the memory timing differences as seen in the attached CPU-Z output and wondered whether that indicated an issue that needed addressing before doing any separate testing of the RAM by slot.

If you look at the screen your MB is defaulting them to 1066mhz. And those would be the correct timings for that frequency. Setting them manually should take care of that.

 

Is the seller right that hardware conflicts can generate errors?

Not so much as far as conflicts, but a bad slot on the MB or memory controller or CPU can most certainly cause problems with Memtest.

I could not determine the area where I can change what appeared to be automatic settings in almost all areas. Thus I am looking to understand if there is a place within the BIOS I should be doing something to get the timings to match what the SPD in CPU-Z says are the four choices.

Section 2.4.1 in your manual. You need to set AI Overclocking to manual first then scroll down to Dram Frequency control. Just set the first four lines of the memory parameters. The rest you can leave on auto. You will also see your Memory voltage too. Make sure it is set correctly.

 

If you dont have a copy of your manual, you can download one like i did from ASUS. This way you can see what im looking at.

 

My impression is that once I fix the BIOS and later reboot with the CD containing memtest86+, I should see fewer or no errors.

It's entirely possible and should be the outcome. Incorstly set memory is the biggest offender of memtest errors

 

Oh yeah, make sure you disable USB legacy support in your BIOS too before running memtest. That setting alone can cause false positives in memtest.

 

Hope this helps ya some.

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Mixing memory can be hit and miss . Most of the time causing problems like what you have described. Is there any chance you can isolate the two different kits and try one kit alone? then the other.

 

Please explain what you mean by mixing memory. I have only one kit with 2 4GB RAM modules that are CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 and they are on the mobo Asus P5G41T-M LX3.

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Did you manually set the timings in your BIOS before running Memtest? And save the settings? I know its a pretty obvious question, but i have to ask.

 

 

If you look at the screen your MB is defaulting them to 1066mhz. And those would be the correct timings for that frequency. Setting them manually should take care of that.

 

 

Not so much as far as conflicts, but a bad slot on the MB or memory controller or CPU can most certainly cause problems with Memtest.

 

Section 2.4.1 in your manual. You need to set AI Overclocking to manual first then scroll down to Dram Frequency control. Just set the first four lines of the memory parameters. The rest you can leave on auto. You will also see your Memory voltage too. Make sure it is set correctly.

 

If you dont have a copy of your manual, you can download one like i did from ASUS. This way you can see what im looking at.

 

 

It's entirely possible and should be the outcome. Incorstly set memory is the biggest offender of memtest errors

 

Oh yeah, make sure you disable USB legacy support in your BIOS too before running memtest. That setting alone can cause false positives in memtest.

 

Hope this helps ya some.

 

Thanks for all the responses. After setting the AI Overclocking to Manual, the CPU Frequency shows as 333 which according to section 2.4.1 synchronizes with FSB 1333. Then under DRAM Frequency in the same section, the only options to choose are Auto, 800 MHz, 1067 MHz or 1333 MHz but the table in that section shows other choices should appear instead when FSB 1333 is used including 667 MHz and others but that is not there and based on what I see in CPU-Z I thought I had to choose 667 MHZ. Please clarify.

 

As to the "scroll down to Dram Frequency control. Just set the first four lines of the memory parameters.", I found the four memory parameters in section 2.4.3 Chipset, North Bridge Configuration, Configure DRAM Timing by SPD. I am a little concerned with changing that part because it reads "Setting wrong values in below sections may cause system to malfunction." Just to be clear I would change the first 3 8's to 9 and the 20 to 24 in that part of the Advanced part of the BIOS Setup before saving. Is that correct?

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If you had modules that were faster than 13333mhz you would have more choices in your BIOS when FSB is set to 1333mhz. Yes, you need to choose 667mhz. DDR stands for Double Data Rate so your frequency will be 667mhz x 2 or 1333mhz.

 

As to the "scroll down to Dram Frequency control. Just set the first four lines of the memory parameters.", I found the four memory parameters in section 2.4.3 Chipset, North Bridge Configuration, Configure DRAM Timing by SPD. I am a little concerned with changing that part because it reads "Setting wrong values in below sections may cause system to malfunction." Just to be clear I would change the first 3 8's to 9 and the 20 to 24 in that part of the Advanced part of the BIOS Setup before saving. Is that correct?

No need to be concerned. It's just a general warning that you are aware that if you get to aggressive with some settings that it could cause a machine to become unstable. But you can not hurt the memory or the MB by changing timings. They can be simply reversed. Besides that, you are not going to set them to anything other than their correct values. The only real settings i really get concerned about are voltages that are too high. and this does not apply to your issue.

 

Just to be clear I would change the first 3 8's to 9 and the 20 to 24 in that part of the Advanced part of the BIOS Setup before saving. Is that correct?

Yes this is correct!

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I would do a search for the Intel G41 Chipset white paper and you will see that it only supports DDR1066 memory officially.

 

If that Chipset only supports DDR1066 memory, will the CMX8GX3M2A1333C9 work or will it cause problems with the clock settings of 8-8-8-20 that result from that DDR1066 which don't match up with any of the clock settings identified by CPU-Z within the Timings Table of the SPD tab? Is there a solution or did the builder just choose the wrong RAM?

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1333mhz memory is supported on that MB, only it's listed as an overclocked speed. I assumed you picked the memory and were trying to overclock your memory from 1066 to 1333mhz?

Is there a solution or did the builder just choose the wrong RAM?

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Set them to 1066mhz. It wont hurt the modules at all.

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1333mhz memory is supported on that MB, only it's listed as an overclocked speed. I assumed you picked the memory and were trying to overclock your memory from 1066 to 1333mhz?

 

Set them to 1066mhz. It wont hurt the modules at all.

 

I got this machine on eBay and the seller built it and no overclocking has been done.

 

I am trying to solve multiple BSOD issues. As part of the attempted solution I reformatted the C (boot) drive as I reinstalled Windows 7 Professional version 64 bit and did not reformat the RAID drive. I installed from the NVIDIA folder in the RAID Drive to get the monitor normal. I installed the Atheros AR8151 PCI-E Ethernet Controller and Realtek Audio Driver from the ASUS Motherboard DVD but have not yet installed Intel Chipset Driver partly because I am uncertain whether that should be installed after Windows SP 1 is done or not. I have not installed anything within the Utilities or Manual sections on the ASUS DVD.

 

I downloaded and installed MSE. I downloaded IE 9 64 bit rather than have IE 8. I installed Adobe Reader X 10.1.1 but did not download Adobe AIR. I am in the process of slowly updating Windows.

 

Decided to run MSE full rather than quick or custom scan as I was going out to the gym. When I returned the system had rebooted due to a BSOD with following info

Dump file:111811-17191-01.dmp

Crash Time: 11/18/2011 8:36:31 PM

Bug Check String: SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION

Bug Check Code: 0x0000003b

Parameter 1: 00000000`c0000005

Parameter 2: fffff800`031ba621

Parameter 3: fffff880`075a3190

Parameter 4: 00000000`00000000

Caused by Driver: ntoskrnl.exe

Caused by Address: ntoskrnl.exe+705c0

Processor: x64

Crash Address: ntoskrnl.exe+705c0

Processors Count: 2

Major Version: 15

Minor Version: 7600

Dump File Size: 283,496

 

Attached is the dmp file in a zip file if that helps resolve what is going on.

 

I decided that memtest86+ needs to be run and ran it overnight with almost 90K errors reported over about 4 or 5 passes as shown in the jpg. The only attachments are keyboard, mouse, monitor and Ethernet cable. Memtest86+ indicates that the memory timing settings applicable to the brand and type of memory modules you have need to match your BIOS settings or that could cause errors. I am trying to understand whether I can rely upon Memtest86+ or not given the 1066mhz settings has clockings inconsistent with the memory timings.

 

I have continued with Windows 7 updates. Windows update failed on SP1 KB976932 with error 0x800f080d after running for an hour. Then another BSOD with different codes.

 

Dump File : 111911-22978-01.dmp

Crash Time : 11/19/2011 9:53:39 AM

Bug Check String : SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

Bug Check Code : 0x1000007e

Parameter 1 : ffffffff`c0000005

Parameter 2 : fffff800`02eca354

Parameter 3 : fffff880`0759e848

Parameter 4 : fffff880`0759e0b0

Caused By Driver : Ntfs.sys

Caused By Address : Ntfs.sys+2b544

Processor : x64

Crash Address : ntoskrnl.exe+78354

Processors Count : 2

Major Version : 15

Minor Version : 7600

Dump File Size : 283,512

 

I can provide that dmp file too if you would like. I have discontinued the updates at this point until I resolve this.

111811-17191-01.zip

1606247059_IMG_1486(800x600).jpg.8c5bc217d4f80cf7c029c76db0af7bf5.jpg

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Intel Chipset Driver partly because I am uncertain whether that should be installed after Windows SP 1 is done or not. I have not installed anything within the Utilities or Manual sections on the ASUS DVD.

Chipset drivers should be installed right after the OS is up and running. It should be one of the first things to be installed. But go ahead and get them running.

I decided that memtest86+ needs to be run and ran it overnight with almost 90K errors reported over about 4 or 5 passes as shown in the jpg. The only attachments are keyboard, mouse, monitor and Ethernet cable. Memtest86+ indicates that the memory timing settings applicable to the brand and type of memory modules you have need to match your BIOS settings or that could cause errors. I am trying to understand whether I can rely upon Memtest86+ or not given the 1066mhz settings has clockings inconsistent with the memory timings.

Run CPU-Z and look at the SPD tab. It will show you the timings used for 1066mhz. They will usually be different from the timings printed on the label of the memory.

Memtest86 is the most reliable memory diagnostic software out there. It will catch things that windows memory diagnostic and other memory diagnostic utilities wont. Just make sure your timings and voltage reflects the JDEC table in CPU-z for 1066mhz under the SPD tab in CPU-z.

 

Get your chipset drivers installed then go into your BIOS and load set-up defaults then test each module in the first slot with memtest. Let them run about 4 passes or until you get an errror.

 

The BSOD are caused by a driver issue from what you have posted above. If you check the Windows forum that error is quite common and there should be a fix listed for it.

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Run CPU-Z and look at the SPD tab. It will show you the timings used for 1066mhz. They will usually be different from the timings printed on the label of the memory.

Memtest86 is the most reliable memory diagnostic software out there. It will catch things that windows memory diagnostic and other memory diagnostic utilities wont. Just make sure your timings and voltage reflects the JDEC table in CPU-z for 1066mhz under the SPD tab in CPU-z.

 

 

The attached shows the memory and SPD from CPU-z and there is no match as the 1066 mHz should be 533 in the table. What do I do here?

CPU-Z memory info.pdf

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