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RMAing multiple kits question


bobn

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Sorry to bring up this old thread . When you need to replace a memory stick, under corsair lifetime warrenty how do they handle it ? Lets say you have 8gb or 2 4gb sticks or 16 gb with 4 4gb sticks , assume only one stick is bad. If you go by the posts saying only get a matched set then you should request a new full set. Would corsair actually send 4 sticks to warrenty 1 bad stick out of a 16 gb and be replacing your full 16gb . Is this just opinions or is there actually facts and documentation to back up the widespread posts on not mixing the exact same ram.
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"Would corsair actually send 4 sticks to warrenty 1 bad stick out of a 16 gb and be replacing your full 16gb ." Yes they do. A large part of the extra cost of buying matched kits is the testing necessary to find matching sticks comprising a kit.

 

"Is this just opinions or is there actually facts and documentation to back up the widespread posts on not mixing the exact same ram." Since it's your money, your welcome to experiment with mixing untested together sticks and kits yourself, though russian roulette comes to mind. As far as documentation, start with Googling "Dual Channel Memory architecture" and go from there: Dual Channel Memory controller, DDR, DDR2, DDR3, ect.

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Doesn't matter how many sticks are bad or how many are in the kit, they always expect the full kit and send like in return.

 

Regarding mixing memory, there's 10 years worth of posts backing it up here alone, not to mention the experience of geeks worldwide. IT IS FACT. It's never recommended to mix sticks, as it rarely ends up going well.

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So if I use a matched set of 8gb ( 2 4gb sticks) and install that set in DIMM 1 and 2 channel A ,then use the exact same memory with another matched set in DIMM 3 and 4 channel B there could be compatibility problems? I don't understand why this would happen , what setting or parameter within modules are checked to determine compatibility for a matched set? I do understand there are variations and the need to have a matched set for a specific channel. It is fairly common to see preconfigured units from major manufactures with different capacity sticks between channels. Motherboard manuals stress the requirement for a matched set for a specific channel without mentioning a need to replace all sticks if you want to increase capacity on a channel. I don't doubt what you guys are saying , just haveing trouble understanding why.
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  • Corsair Employees

Mixing memory can be hit and miss and officially we do not suggest or support mixing sets, it is not that it cannot be done because it has and in some cases it will work with out problems, but most of the time it will result in an unstable system or not detecting all of the memory.

 

However, it is your money you are welcome to try anything you like but if it does not work there is not a lot we can do to help you resolve the issue.

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I now understand that even though it is the same exact memory by the description, box and model number there may be differences between modules. Tier 1 companies are manufactures who make the chips, Tier 2 puts the chips on the modules and Tier 3 are marketing brand name companies (corsair) who purchase ram memory from Tier 2 manufactures then rebrand and sell. With the shifting suppliers to Tier 2 and Tier 3 there will be variations in the rebranded products and you could buy 8 GB kits with the exact same model number and packaging that look like clones. But they may have totally different chip manufactures and Tier 2 manufactures. So I agree, get the 16Gb kit and if any sticks are bad the whole kit should be returned. Have I figured this out or is there more involved?
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  • Corsair Employees

We would be considered a Tier two company in this model, we purchase memory IC's direct in most cases from Memory IC manufacturers and screen and build the modules with said memory IC's, and in some cases we purchase Raw Dies, from these respective manufactures and have the memory IC's packaged to our specifications this is why you may see some memory IC's with our Logo on the IC.

In Addition it would not make any difference if we were a tier one, two, three or four memory company in reference to your original question about mixing memory. The only way we can guarantee two or four or six pieces of memory will work together is if they are Built and tested together and sold as one set.

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Ok fair enough ramguy, build and tested together as a set , that makes sence. I don't need memory compatibility problems so I paid extra to get a matched set of vengence 16GB 4 X4 GB DDR3 CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9B memory. Now for the part I don't quite understand. Three of the modules are obviously build together , the numbers are in exact sequence.

184955

184956

184957

 

But the 4th module is numbered 184750, why is it out of sequence , obviously not a coincidence that three modules are sequential . I find it odd , wonder if this is a matched set by your criteria and the matched set concept. Why would the person testing the matched 4 module set need to go back over 200 modules to round out my set? I don't want to have a problem like some where one module out of 4 is nonfunctional.

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