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System won't POST - H100 acting weird


Joe2478

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One month old computer. Never had any issues yet.

 

Well, last night I went out for a few hours, and when I got back, I noticed the computer was off. I figured it probably went to sleep, since I wasn't running uTorrent, like I normally am. I hit the space bar and move the mouse around. Nothin'. So I hit the power button. Sounds like it's booting up, but there's no video. Looking down at the H100 cooler, I notice none of the lights are on **except** for the little man. Clicking the button in the middle does nothing. Also, the DRAM_LED on the motherboard is red. I do have a motherboard speaker installed, and there's no beeps. Also, nothing USB powers on. For example, the mouse & keyboard.

 

Picture of H100 & red DRAM_LED

 

No flash so you can see the H100's lights

 

1. The first thing I did was resit the RAM. After that didn't work, I tried booting to separate times, using just one stick at a time, checking to see if perhaps one of them went bad. Still nothing new.

 

2. I put both sticks of RAM back in and ran automatic memory compatibility tuning using the MemOK! switch. After a lot of blinking, and several automatic reboots, I'm back to the solid red light.

 

3. I reset the CMOS using the jumper. No change.

 

4. Someone suggested it might be a power issue, so I swapped the PSU out with the one from my old computer. It's a Corsair HX620W. No change

 

5. I started looking into what the H100 is doing. (i.e. no cooling mode lights, only "little man" light being lit) I've found plenty of installation guides, but no user manuals for the Corsair hydro products. All I can go by is what I find on different tech forums with other people reporting the same problem. I unplug all the connectors & reconnect. No change.

 

At this point, I take the H100 out of the tower, and set it up with my old computer's motherboard. It's only the MB, CPU, RAM, GPU & PSU. I'm able to POST, and log into the bios, but the H100 is behaving exactly the same. Only the "little man" is lit. I didn't leave it on long in case the cooler wasn't working.

 

So there's my problem. I'm pretty sure, especially after reading other people here reporting the same issue, that my H100 is done. Is there anything that it crapping out could've done to the rest of the system? Could it not working have killed the CPU? I thought the system would turn itself off before any damage would be done, but 24 hours later, I still can't even POST. =\

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Is the pump running? Is it possible that the pump has failed? Maybe its not posting because the CPU is overheating, and shutting itself down? Throw another cooler on it... plug the pump up to another header so you can see how fast its moving. Post those findings here.
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A few questions for you:

 

When you started your PC after you first found it off, what did the H100's fans do? Did they run, could you hear them?

 

During all your testing of your PC before you removed the H100, what were it's fans doing when you attempted to boot the PC, or running MemOK? Did the fans run when you tried the H100 in the other PC?

 

For the cooler to not be working, either the fans would be not running at all, or the pump would be not working. In the other PC that you tested the H100 in, you could get into the BIOS, correct? If so, you could have checked the pumps speed (~2000 RPM) as long as it's three pin fan-type connector was plugged into a mother board fan header. You can't be sure the pump is not working if you don't check it's speed.

 

When the man icon on the H100 is lighted up, that is manual mode (although you cannot do anything without the Corsair Link hardware/software) and usually the fans run at full speed in that mode. Also, when the H100's fan control software crashes, the fans usually run at full speed. Your CPU would not over heat in those cases.

 

If the fans were not running for some reason, your CPU should have shut itself off when and if the CPU overheated. The CPU thermal safety features are standard and described in Intel's technical documents, so in theory (yeah, I know...) it should be fine. I have never seen any complaints about Intel CPUs being destroyed from over heating due to the CPU not turning itself off. I'm a regular visitor and post in Intel's forums.

 

There is a procedure for resetting the firmware on a H100, that involves pressing and holding down the button before the PC has booted. I don't own a H100, so have never done this but the procedure should be documented in this forum. Will a H100 owner point him to that procedure?

 

I own your mother board, so I'm familiar with it. You seem to have done the correct procedures for dealing with the DRAM LED being on. I must say that in the past a failure to POST or not getting a POST beep code of any kind can indicate a CPU problem.

 

However, this board also has a CPU diagnostic LED (ie, POST State LED) that is located at the bottom of the DRAM slots, on the opposite side of the DRAM LED. I assume it is not on, which is a good sign regarding the health of your CPU.

 

All the POST/BIOS code is run on the CPU, such as the memory diagnostic and MemOK. When you pressed the MemOK button, the DRAM LED should begin to flash slowly, and after several seconds it will flash faster. This sequence repeats several times, with the LED flashing faster each time, until the MemOK process is done. If you saw this happen on your board, which I think you did, your CPU was executing that process, and therefore is fine.

 

Don't forget that on this board, the DRAM, CPU, and VGA (video card) diagnostic tests that ASUS has added as part of the POST process, will not allow the POST process to complete if any of the diagnostic tests fail. In your case it is stuck on the DRAM test for some reason. That is what is stopping the POST process.

 

Why that test is failing is the question. You likely will need to try different memory. You may have also had a mother board failure of some kind.

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The DRAM LED is lit. In the manual it says a LED will stay on if there is a error. So the LED that is lit in the pictures is the DRAM_LED. Which means there is a error in the memory modules that is preventing it from POST. That is why i recommended the OP to do a Memtest.
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While it seemed pretty complex in the beginning, it ended up being a pretty simple problem. The RAM was indeed bad. I was able to POST using a different set of RAM I "borrowed" from work. I still find it kind of odd that the RAM worked for over a month without a problem.

 

When I get my new RAM in, I'll be sure to memtest it right away. Thanks for the inputs & advice.

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@joe 2478 - dude where did you connect the 3pin coming from the h100 in the board? is it in the CPU FAN PWN? TIA! =)

 

The H100 was indeed plugged into the CPU_FAN. At the end of the day, the RAM was the issue, and the H100 acting up was completely unrelated. I discovered, via these forums while doing my research to troubleshoot my problem, that my H100 is from a defective lot. I'm RMAing both the RAM & H100.

 

I hate that half of my system is Corsair, and here I am a month after I built it, having to RMA two Corsair products, but ***** happens.

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Is it possible to run memtest if the MB doesn't even get past the POST? I don't see how that's possible.

 

It's not, you are right. I assume that MemOk stops POST only for a major memory failure or incompatibility, but if not it does ruin the use memtest. No way to override MemOk AFAIK, so we are stuck with this.

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I have run in to the same problem on several Asus motherboards.... they seem to be really really picky on the RAM used. There is a button on the systemboard that says MEM OK! Usually when I have the same problem happen with the systems I mentioned I have to power on the system and hold this button in for a bit, then the red LED starts flashing and doing some stuff, then finally it will boot up and post :)

 

I did have a few systems do the same thing though and then the RAM would no longer work in that system, but would in others.....

 

(seen where you hit the button)

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I have run in to the same problem on several Asus motherboards.... they seem to be really really picky on the RAM used. There is a button on the systemboard that says MEM OK! Usually when I have the same problem happen with the systems I mentioned I have to power on the system and hold this button in for a bit, then the red LED starts flashing and doing some stuff, then finally it will boot up and post :)

 

I did have a few systems do the same thing though and then the RAM would no longer work in that system, but would in others.....

 

(seen where you hit the button)

 

Ditto,

 

But, admittedly I ran into this annoying issue on ASUS AMD boards.

 

I've used ASUS exclusively for years for much of my kit. Recently, there seems to been a sharp decline in the quality of their kit, and their after market sales has really changed from what it once was too :(.

 

Thankfully Corsair and g*gabyte have taken their place, and it's ASUS' loss if they can't pull their fingers out lol :).

 

Shame!!

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Ditto,

 

But, admittedly I ran into this annoying issue on ASUS AMD boards.

 

I've used ASUS exclusively for years for much of my kit. Recently, there seems to been a sharp decline in the quality of their kit, and their after market sales has really changed from what it once was too :(.

 

Thankfully Corsair and g*gabyte have taken their place, and it's ASUS' loss if they can't pull their fingers out lol :).

 

Shame!!

 

A_Wolf, I know what you mean about mother boards, it's not the greatest market place at all. IMO, the lesser known brands all have one or more odd things about them, such as the BIOS/UEFI being strange, so I can't own one. The mid-level players ( EV-- and Int--) are Ok, but miss in performance areas or are to conservative performance-wise, so also have no interest for me.

 

That leaves Giga and ASUS in my book. The newest Giga boards don't use a UEFI, which apparently will really hurt them when Sandy Bridge-E CPUs are released, which (simply put) need a UEFI update that will not fit in a standard BIOS CMOS chip. My latest board is an ASUS, but they chose to "fix" an issue with "to high" CPU temps while in the UEFI by changing the UEFI to use a temp sensor in the CPU socket or on the board, rather than the actual CPU temp sensors. That changed the CPU temp reading overall by reducing it about 10 degrees C. The boards own temp monitoring software also uses that false reading. I noticed this when I flashed to a new UEFI, and afterward my CPU temp was magically 10C less.

 

It's really ridiculous, if you have good CPU cooling and use Speed Step, etc, at idle I would see CPU temps of 60F or less! Yes, Fahrenheit, over 10F below my room temperature! I pointed that out to them but was ignored. Fortunately, third party programs won't use that reading, so I'm fine. One program actually shows me both CPU temp readings at the same time, hilarious! It does make me wonder what else they would do or have done if they did this. Sorry Corsair, I can't give you credit for lowering my CPU temp below my room temperature, but I can say that my actual idle temps are so low, that I get sub-ambient CPU temps with their crazy data.

 

I know, hard to believe, but I wouldn't post this under my ID if I was not sure about it.

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Is it possible to run memtest if the MB doesn't even get past the POST? I don't see how that's possible.

 

Press the MemOK! button until it flashes.

-Wait for it to give you a message saying Successful boot.

-Go to the bios and enable XMP. This should automatically configure your memory. Make sure the DRAM_Voltage is around 1.5v.

If this did not work then use the settings the MemOK! feature changed.

-Boot to Windows

-Download the latest BIOS from the Asus website.

From the ASUS Website

 

Sabertooth P67 1904 BIOS

1. Improve memory compatibility

2. Improve system stability

3. Support new CPUs. Please refer to our website at: http://support.asus.com/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us

 

-Save the BIOS file on a USB and reboot.

-If it POST then flash the new BIOS on the USB.

-If it DOES NOT POST then post back here.

 

 

 

IF YOU HAVE SPARE DDR3 RAM STICKS.

 

-Instead of the Dominator modules install the spare memory modules and check if it will post.

If it does, then flash the BIOS to 1904.

-When it is finished reset the BIOS to defaults and try and install the Dominator Modules.

-Check and see if it will POST.

 

If it does not POST then the Dominator modules are not compatible with the motherboard. The Dominator GT modules runs at 1.65v which is for Intel X58 chipsets. Most Sandy Bridge memory sticks run at a max 1.5v.

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Yup,

 

Know what you mean parsec m8!! It's not an ideal state of affairs, but with such a competitive market, the sheer rate technology is moving on, and unfortunately global events/natural disasters, etc, etc. All to often, quality begins to suffer further to the needs of quantity!!

 

All you can do really is buy as much kit as you can to try to future proof yourself and maybe save a bit of cash, after that, rebuilds and partial rebuilds seem to need doing annually these days lol ;).

 

You're also on a sticky wicket if you buy cheap, or even mid range too these days as you also point out. Buy too cheap, it's dead within 6 months or cr*p from the word go, mid-end kit is a minefield of kit you don't know whether to trust until you've tried one personally to know for certain. The high-end kit, seriously over priced, and in some cases not being sold as advertised or fit for the purpose....

 

....But, that's a whole other issue that I'm sure both of us would be gnashing our gums at hardware manufacturers for lolol.

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Wolf, I forgot to mention that one of the first boards I ever bought was a Giga. Socket 775, DDR2, P43 chipset, really "old stuff" these days, almost three years old (OMG! ;):) About a $140 board, so I guess mid-range, still working just fine. Always liked it, never gave me grief, so I agree with you about Giga, I'd buy from them again.

 

Actually, high-end, big-money boards can be dicey with all the features that can go wrong, so a good mid-priced board might be the best bet.

 

As for gnashing my gums, don't get me started... :laughcry:

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