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Old PCI-E Cables in New HX850W


gavin28x

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Hypothetically speaking of course... Say "my friend", Owned a 550 and 650 modular corsair PSU, then he bought a HX850 Modular and they all work great.

 

Then say "my friend" gets a new video card to put into cross fire in the system with the hx850, and he goes to get modular cables to hook up the new 2nd video card, but he grabs PCI-E cables from one of the old power supplies that plug into the 6 pin connectors on the PSU instead of using the blue 8 pin PCI-e power connectors.

 

Would this Brick the card? Or do you think that it just wouldn't provide sufficient power, and not power up the card / PC?

 

Just some food for thought, hoping someone can help answer this question.

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Yeah, well I wasn't intentionally using old cables, I got the new VideoCard plugged it in went to grab cables which are all kept in the same tub together, and grabbed the first two that said PCI-E and had the 6+2 connector on it.

 

It didn't cross my mind until afterward that there might be a problem. I've had the system put together for months, and only used the Hardwired PCI-e connectors so when I went to grab modular I didn't think anything of it since neither of the old PSU's had different connectors for the PCI-e iirc.

 

The Card was a used card that I got which had been sitting around at a friends house I finally decided to buy it from him and do some Crossfire, so I am not sure if it was just DOA or if using the older cables on the 6pin slots on the HX850 would have killed it.

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Yeah it seems to be dead, but I am not sure if it is dead because I used the wrong cables or because it was sitting on my buddies shelf for so long and something happened to it.

 

What I was trying to figure out or at least what I was thinking was that (after I noticed the 8pin Blue connectors would be the PCI-e connectors and outputting 12v) that the 6pin are all outputting 5v and if the video card normally takes 12v then under powering it shouldn't have hurt the card it just wouldn't work... Or does that not sound right...

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No it wasn't and it was dusty as heck lol, I figured it can't hurt anything to try it out, but that's why I am thinking its the card was just bad...

 

I was posting on the forums because I wanted to see if anyone knew if it was possible to kill the card with what I did. I was thinking that if anything I would just have underpowered the card and that it wouldn't, but when I fixed my mistake the card still didn't power on.

 

 

So did I kill the card or is it more likely that it was just "DOA".

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yeah I get the whole DOA thing I was using the term improperly, I mean dead from before it got it or did I kill it... anyway just wondering if what I did would have killed the card or just have left it underpowered and not working. If anyone knows AWESOME... thanks.
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yeah I get the whole DOA thing I was using the term improperly, I mean dead from before it got it or did I kill it... anyway just wondering if what I did would have killed the card or just have left it underpowered and not working. If anyone knows AWESOME... thanks.

 

Did you lower the clock speeds when you underpowered the card?

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Yeah it seems to be dead, but I am not sure if it is dead because I used the wrong cables or because it was sitting on my buddies shelf for so long and something happened to it.

 

What I was trying to figure out or at least what I was thinking was that (after I noticed the 8pin Blue connectors would be the PCI-e connectors and outputting 12v) that the 6pin are all outputting 5v and if the video card normally takes 12v then under powering it shouldn't have hurt the card it just wouldn't work... Or does that not sound right...

 

First, although one should only use the cables provided for a modular PS, the cable that would most likely be consistent and compatible with the same manufactures modular PS, would be the PCI-E cable. That does not guarantee it!

 

Of greater significance is where this borrowed cable is plugged in on the modular PS. We would hope it would not fit where is does not belong, but given what you are telling us, that does not seem to be the case.

 

You said you are seeing 5V at the output of the PCI-E cable? That is weird, and sounds like the cable was plugged (or partially plugged) into the SATA or four pin peripheral (molex) outputs. That would explain the 5V output. How did you measure that?

 

Under-volting a video card should not destroy it, they won't even start up with less than 10V. But polarity can be a problem, meaning the + and - connections are reversed. With AC power from the wall, polarity is not a big deal, but with DC it can be, think of a flashlight when you put the battery in wrong. What will that do to a video card? Don't know.

 

So, did you get the correct PCI-E cable for your PS, connect it to the correct output on your PS, then connect it to the video card in question, and try it out? What happened? Did it's fan run? Did the PC boot? BIOS error beeps? Magic blue smoke released?

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yeah I get the whole DOA thing I was using the term improperly, I mean dead from before it got it or did I kill it... anyway just wondering if what I did would have killed the card or just have left it underpowered and not working. If anyone knows AWESOME... thanks.

It's hard telling. It may have just been dead when you got it. Using the wrong PCI-e cables would have done it too. But i seriously doubt ES was the reason it died. I have NEVER seen or had a component die from static electricity.

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I have, but it was so severe it caused a spark, motherboard died because of it.

This was when i bought a new PSU from a different brand a few years back, and before i plugged everything into the system i did a "testbed" setup on the table, using the screwdriver trick to power up the board, as soon as the screwdriver touched the pins (yes i touched the correct ones) a spark flew & killed the motherboard, everything else worked fine still.

 

So yeah ESD does exist but imo for it to be so severe to actually kill components you'd SEE it happening.

 

Ever since then i constantly touch my ground in the wallsockets when working with hardware -.-

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I have, but it was so severe it caused a spark, motherboard died because of it.

This was when i bought a new PSU from a different brand a few years back, and before i plugged everything into the system i did a "testbed" setup on the table, using the screwdriver trick to power up the board, as soon as the screwdriver touched the pins (yes i touched the correct ones) a spark flew & killed the motherboard, everything else worked fine still.

 

So yeah ESD does exist but imo for it to be so severe to actually kill components you'd SEE it happening.

 

Ever since then i constantly touch my ground in the wallsockets when working with hardware -.-

But that is not ESD. That was a spark from touching a hot and ground sides of the switch connector. You will get that spark anytime you complete a LIVE circuit which is what happened when you shorted the connector with a screwdriver in which case 20 wrist straps wouldn't have prevented your MB from being bacon.

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