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H60 temps and other questions


Tonner Cyn

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I recently purchased a new computer using the H60 cooler. So you don't have to look at my profile, I am using a CoolerMaster 690 II Advanced case that has plenty of airflow (almost all of the wires are behind the motherboard), my processor is an i5-2500k, and I am using a GTX 570 video card. I have a 140mm fan on the front drawing air into the case, 2 140mm fans on top blowing air out of the case, and a 120mm fan on the back also exhausting out.

 

My core temps are running from 30-35 degrees on stock settings. Under load using Prime 95 the temps jump into the 50's, topping out around 60-61. I did try overclocking to 4.0ghz but my temps jumped to the mid to high 60's, maxing out between 71-73. That seemed a little high to me. I have already replaced the thermal paste with MX-4 and added one of those top 140mm fans. I did change the direction of the back fan connected to the radiator and had it drawing air into the case and temps did seem to be a couple degrees cooler but right now I have it blowing out of the case.

 

Questions:

1 - I did buy a second 120mm fan to do the push/pull configuration. From reading here I saw something that said the fans should be the same. Is this true? It isn't a big deal to order another fan but it will take a couple of days.

2 - While it seems the typical recommendation is to have the back fan blowing out of the case, I have read here many people who say it is okay to go with whatever works best. That being the case, is there any long-term problem to look out for when having the fan drawing air into the case?

3 - The 120mm fan I did buy came with short screws. There is no way I can attach the fan to the radiator using those and a regular screwdriver. What is the recommended approach? I measured the screws that are holding the current fan to the radiator; they thread through the outside and are about 3.2mm long. Can I just use 4 of those to connect the second fan to the radiator?

 

Thanks in advance guys.

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1. It is a good idea to use two fans of same spec to prevent one impeding the other.

2. Unless your room temperatures are higher than your internal case temperatures it is better to have fans blowing air into the case. You actually answered your own question in your post when you said temp were lower when blowing air into case.

3. You can use two of the screws from original fan to hold fans on diagonal corners with no problems. The screws are 6.32 American thread by 1.25" long and can be got from hardware suppliers in a lot of countries.

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I went to Fry's and they had a two-pack of 120mm fans for $10. Hard to beat that price so I picked them up. I have them installed and exhausting into the case. Temps are ranging between 28 and 33 degrees so I am happy right now. I may try overclocking and see what they jump to.

 

With all the changes and having ordered one 120mm fan before learning I should use two of the same, I now have two extra 120mm fans laying around. I could add them to the side of the case exhausting out though powering them will be a little bit of an issue. I have splitters in both of the SysFan jumpers on the mobo but only one open. Is it okay to connect a splitter to a splitter?

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i just built my computer with an evga z68 ftw board. In the bios the cpu temps are at 46! When windows starts up and i open the evga e-leet tuning utility the temps read as follows:

core #0: 32.0

core #1: 31.0

core #2: 31.0

core #4: 32.0

package: 36.0

 

The core temperatures fluctuate between 29 and 32 on idle, but the package temp stays at 36.

Can someone help me understand why these temps are in the 30s and the cpu temp read by my bios is in the 40s?? should i be concerned about the cooler, or evga bios?

 

also, I bought a second fan but the RPM on the second fan is half of the corsair fan. should i get a faster fan at the same specs as the corsair fan, or use 2 slower fans (i have another fan with the same exact specs as the slow fan)? I'm currently using the corsair as the push and the slower fan as the pull, is this ok or should i have it in reverse order? Also, does it make a difference where the radiator is mounted? i have my radiator mounted to the top of the case on the inside rather than at the rear exhaust place. would it be easier for the pump if it were mounted at the rear exhaust place with the tubes horizontal and not vertical?

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I went to Fry's and they had a two-pack of 120mm fans for $10. Hard to beat that price so I picked them up. I have them installed and exhausting into the case. Temps are ranging between 28 and 33 degrees so I am happy right now. I may try overclocking and see what they jump to.

 

With all the changes and having ordered one 120mm fan before learning I should use two of the same, I now have two extra 120mm fans laying around. I could add them to the side of the case exhausting out though powering them will be a little bit of an issue. I have splitters in both of the SysFan jumpers on the mobo but only one open. Is it okay to connect a splitter to a splitter?

 

While it is not bad advice to use identical fans for a push-pull configuration with any H-series cooler, it is not necessarily better to do so, and many people use different fans, including myself. Actually, unless this has changed recently, it is not possible to buy extra, matching Corsair fans for these coolers.

 

If a different fan is used for the pull fan, all that is really required is for the fan to have a speed range that is not very different from the push fan, and can be run at about the same speed. The only real issue would be a very slow speed pull fan that might restrict air flow, or provide no additional air flow, and would serve no purpose.

 

The Corsair fans are specifically designed for use with radiators, they have high Static Pressure, meaning they can more readily push air through restrictions to air flow. Most fans do not have the same capability as the Corsair fans do. But, a pulling fan does not need this capability.

 

Also, some people do not use the Corsair fans at all, usually for a specific purpose such as reduced noise, which usually is a trade-off for cooling efficiency. Or they don't care about noise, and get very high RPM/high air volume fans.

 

Regarding splitters connected to splitters, you must be careful doing that when they are connected to a mother board. Those fans headers are designed to provide only about 1 amp or 12Watts maximum each, much less power than a direct power supply connection. Depending on the power requirements of the fans, you can get away with it, but more than two fans on one mother board connection is pushing your luck if they are run at full speed. Those connections have a much more limited power capability than a direct PS connection, or through a good separate fan controller.

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  • Corsair Employees

Good Post parsec, and you are correct just to add to what parsec stated when you mix fans you will want to use the fan with the highest static pressure against the Radiator to help maintain the cooling performance.

 

And the fans are available under cooling accessories as far as I know if you want to use our fans. They are above average for Airflow and static pressure but there are some other fans available on the market.

However, I would strongly encourage you to do research on any non corsair fans you plan to buy and search for reviews on those fans. I have found a lot of the fans on the market do not test to what they are rated at. But I would expect that to change soon as the fan manufacturers who have been short changing people have been called out a few times. Just please check for reviews on any fans you plan to use to protect your self.

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Thanks RAM GUY, I appreciate that!

 

Ya know, I checked Cooling Accessories on the US site, and didn't see those fans offered. But recently someone posted a link to those fans, and they were there, unless I'm dreaming while browsing at 2AM. :eyebuldge Maybe I need to clear my browser cache...

 

I didn't see any 120mm fans in the Case Accessories section either.

 

Being the fan-natic that I am (I have a huge collection), I truly believe that the Corsair fans provided with the H-series coolers are great fans. If you examine their frame (the inner portion), it is unique (AFAIK) in it's design, which must aid in it's static pressure capability. I've tried other fans for the push fan, but find I prefer the Corsair fans. IMO, there are many fans available that are really nothing special.

 

Some H-series users have found fans that work very well in their build's, but they have verified the performance with testing. Just throwing in a random fan that is our favorite does not mean it will perform well in a H-series cooler.

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