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Adding memory probs


Evil Ted

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Hello,

 

I have an ASUS A8N-SLI Premium motherboard running Windows XP x64.

I have 2GB memory (VS2GBKIT400C3)

Set at 3-3-3-8-2T

Voltage is set to auto, and frequency is 333.

 

I purchased another VS2GBKIT400C3 today to have 4GB total. My setup shows I have 4096MB installed and 4096MB available, but Windows will not start. I then manually disabled H/W DRAM above 4GB remap, which allows windows to start. However, I now show that I have 4096MB installed, but 3072MB available. Windows properties also shows 3GB available.

 

My understanding was the 64bit operating system allowed 4GB usage. I have switched the frequency to 400 and manually set the voltage, but neither seems to make a difference.

 

So, am I wrong about the x64 edition being able to use all 4GB? Is there a best frequency to use? Is there any value to manually setting the voltage?

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Ted

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I reset the CMOS. Interestingly, the auto-detected settings were 3-3-3-7-2T. Although there was no difference. I switched the H/W remp to disabled, and again have 4GB installed and 3GB usable.

 

I also called ASUS to see if they had any ideas. They stated that because the board recognizes the 4GB it should work with my operating system (XP x64). They said it's just a matter of getting the seetings from Corsair. :/

 

Please help RamGuy.

 

Thanks,

Ted

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I have set my settings as you just posted.

3-3-3-8-2T

333MHz

2.6 volts (lowest setting other than auto)

 

As I stated in my 1st post, these are the settings I originally tried, and they didn't work. The only thing that's made a difference so far is disabling the H/W greater than 4GB remap. Enabled, CMOS setup shows 4GB installed, 4GB usable, but windows won't start (not even in safe mode.) Disabled, CMOS setup shows 4GB installed, 3GB usable, and windows starts normally. Windows properties also shows 3GB installed.

 

I agree with ASUS that this seems like a settings issue, but my knowledge is limited to the above settings. There are a bunch of other adjustable settings on the DRAMM setup page. Does anyone have any suggestions of other settings to check? Maybe a Windows setting?

 

Thanks again,

Ted

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I have set my settings as you just posted.

3-3-3-8-2T

333MHz

2.6 volts (lowest setting other than auto)

 

As I stated in my 1st post, these are the settings I originally tried, and they didn't work. The only thing that's made a difference so far is disabling the H/W greater than 4GB remap. Enabled, CMOS setup shows 4GB installed, 4GB usable, but windows won't start (not even in safe mode.) Disabled, CMOS setup shows 4GB installed, 3GB usable, and windows starts normally. Windows properties also shows 3GB installed.

 

I agree with ASUS that this seems like a settings issue, but my knowledge is limited to the above settings. There are a bunch of other adjustable settings on the DRAMM setup page. Does anyone have any suggestions of other settings to check? Maybe a Windows setting?

 

Thanks again,

Ted

 

I think this might be due to both the limitations of your processor's on-die memory controller and the fact that you might be mixing kits with two different brands and models of IC chips. The Athlon 64's on-die memory controller is among the most sensitive (of all the memory controllers of the era between 2002 and 2005) to even minor differences in the memory parts; thus, you simply might have two kits which don't quite play nice with one another. The CPU can run all four 1GB modules, all right - but all of them should be exactly identical to one another in each and every single minute detail. In this case, since you purchased the two kits many years apart, there is no guarantee that the newer kit even uses the exact same IC chips as your existing modules - nor is there any guarantee that the modules in the newer kit are even compatible with the modules in your existing kit. This holds even more true for the Value Select series: Even if you purchase two kits at the same store on the same day, the different kits could have been from different manufacturers (Corsair merely receives them as fully assembled modules, which it then tests, and then the two modules that were deemed to work together were then packaged together into a dual-module kit).

 

And although the Athlon 64 processor is considered a "true" 64-bit processor, the memory controller of its Socket 939 (DDR1) edition (this includes many of the first x2 dual-core models) still has 32-bit-era limitations (4GB maximum memory capacity, upper memory addresses must be reserved for use by PCI device addresses even with a 64-bit Windows operating system).

 

By the way, is there any reason why are you continuing to use Windows XP 64-bit? As of October 2009, all versions of Windows XP including the 64-bit x86-64 edition have been taken off the mainstream support list. That OS is now in its extended support phase, which means that bug fixes and security fixes will come less and less frequently, leaving your system more and more vulnerable to security breaches and malware unless you have already been keeping your antivirus and anti-spyware software up to date. Plus, Windows XP 64-bit does not fully support a lot of 32-bit software (newer 64-bit Windows like Windows 7 support more 32-bit programs than XP 64-bit but still prefer native x86-64 programs). Windows XP 64-bit x86-64 should not be confused with the original Windows XP 64-bit, which was designed for the Intel/HP Itanium processors - and when HP discontinued its last Itanium workstation back in early 2005 (HP continues to use the Itanium processor in its mid-range servers), Microsoft ceased supporting the original Windows XP 64-bit entirely a few months later. And Windows XP 64-bit x86-64 edition is not quite the same OS as regular Windows XP; instead, it is largely based on Windows Server 2003. Any Service Packs offered for the Windows XP x86-64 operating system are based on and released along with the Service Packs for Windows Server 2003. No new Service Packs were released for Windows Server 2003 (and hence Windows XP 64-bit x86-64 Edition) since the introduction of its successor, Windows Server 2008.

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