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trapped air inside H50


Picaroon

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It seems there's some trapped air inside the H50 unit (hearable when I gently shake the radiator). Does this keep the pressure within a certain limit when the warm fluid expands?

 

Or shouldn't be there any air in the unit in the first place and is my H50 defect?

 

Temperatures are fine by the way. 30 degrees Celsius lower compared to stock cooling.

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I ran my newbuild for the first time this morning and I could hear a slight gurgling noise from the H50. This settled down after a while and I heard no more. I imagine that there is a little air inside but, like you, don't know if there should be. Be interesting to see a reply from the Techs.
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When I first got my unit, I also shook the radiator a bit and could hear some movement. I powered it on and I indeed heard some sloshing but went away after a minute. I think it's fine as my temperatures are pretty low (high/mid 30's)

 

Though I am worried that I don't know how long before the liquid inside evaporates

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There is going to be air in the H50's, just as well as there is air in most water cooling setups. If you shake the radiator you will hear the coolant moving back and forth.

 

As others have stated, once they fired up their H50's the noise went away after a little while. This is because the system has worked the air to the highest point in the loop, which means the air is no longer being pumped through the pump.

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  • 2 weeks later...

After three months of uneventful cooling, I noticed an air/fluid churning sound in my H50 which eventually went away after 20-30 seconds. I also attributed it to trapped air that worked its way to the high point of the heat exchange unit, not unlike old cars without a radiator expansion tank. Upon closer inspection, I saw coolant dripping from the pump assembly which spread over the bottom half of the motherboard and video card resulting in intermittent and unexplained crashes on my ASUS P6X58D Premium motherboard. This event was mentioned this on another thread but received no responses. I had to replace the damaged video card. I was able to salvage the motherboard, but it took several hours to mop up the ethylene glycol with cotton swabs, aspirate the blobs of fluid that adhered to the underside of the components with a mini-vacuum cleaner attachment, and carefully blow out the rest of the gunk with compressed air. The ethylene glycol is quite tenacious and difficult to remove.

 

I think the H50 design is a good concept, but I would monitor it for any signs of a leak. As to the comments about "no other complaints about H50 leaks," somebody has their head in the sand. I have since replaced the H50 with a low noise fan based cooling unit.

 

DO YOURSELF A FAVOR AND LOOK FOR A LEAK AT THE PUMP HEAD.

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When I first got my unit, I also shook the radiator a bit and could hear some movement. I powered it on and I indeed heard some sloshing but went away after a minute. I think it's fine as my temperatures are pretty low (high/mid 30's)

 

Though I am worried that I don't know how long before the liquid inside evaporates

 

I think you have it reversed.

 

Charles' law (also known as the law of volumes) is an experimental gas law which describes how gasses tend to expand when heated. The trapped air in the H50 will expand when the CPU transfers heat to the heat sink in the pump head. The only way the air could disappear is to lower the temperature of the fluid or dramatically increase the pressure within the sealed system (Boyle's Law).

 

As I said in my other post: BE VIGILANT FOR ANY BREAKS IN THE SYSTEM INTEGRITY.

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