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CMX4GX3M2A1600C9 with Asus Crosshair III Formula


Cronaldo17

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  • 1 month later...
I've been looking for ram for the crosshair III as well and all i can tell you is it is NOT on the compatability list for the crosshair III or a phenom II processor.

 

It should work, actually. I called Asus Technical Support and if you're referring to the Asus QVL, that list (according to the tech) was generated at the time of prototype testing, and most of the RAM on that list isn't even available anymore. The best thing to do (as he said) was to check the actual RAM websites for Corsair, Crucial, etc depending on what brand you're going to buy and go off of that. For OCZ and others you may have to call in as their sites don't get updated as much.

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There is a huge difference between "should work" and working well. I relayed the results of my searching at the time to the original poster. Its up to the individual to build their system the way they want, with the components they want and live with the results. I have found that its better in the long run to research your components and avoid the ones with known issues and go with the ones with proven compatibility.

Please note that i did not say the ram would not work only that i could not find it on the compatibility lists.

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I'm sorry to say this, but the memory that you linked to is designed to be used on a Socket LGA1156 Intel i7/i5/i3 platform. Your AMD platform, on the other hand, needs the "B" series kit (CMX4GX3M2B1600C9). The two kits are not compatible with one another. The biggest difference between the two is that the kit you linked to includes XMP memory profiles that only Intel platforms can use (and memory with such brand-specific profiles will not work properly on another brand's platform) while the kit that I suggested (although similar) includes profiles that are specific to AMD Phenom II processors.

 

Have you ever met someone who has used AMD's Black Edition Memory Profiles? My guess is: no. Why? Because they don't even exist yet. Yes, the RAM is meant to work with those profiles eventually, but at present they do not. This is why the RAM's voltage, timings, AND frequency are identical to the one you claim is for Intel chips. For instance, I have a Crosshair III Motherboard, now look at this link:

 

http://www.corsair.com/configurator/product_results.aspx?id=1048893

 

When you scroll to the bottom you will find a list that includes the CMD4GX3M2A1600C8 memory option. Now, the Crosshair III is am AM3 motherboard, therefore only compatible with the Phenom II processors. So, how in the world could the motherboard support that memory (it being an AM3 board) and yet NOT be compatible? The answer is, they ARE compatible. Notice the only difference in the product name is that single letter? This is because they are identical RAM sticks, the only difference being one is meant to interface with a specific OPTION for Intel chips while the other is not. And, the only thing the Black Edition Memory Profiles are supposed to do is read a certain timing out of the box... so if you're planning on manually setting them it makes no difference.

 

In summary: Only IF you are planning on using Intel or AMD-specific profile OPTIONS should you be worried about choosing between the memory options. If you don't plan on doing that, then why would it make a difference.

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Have you ever met someone who has used AMD's Black Edition Memory Profiles? My guess is: no. Why? Because they don't even exist yet. Yes, the RAM is meant to work with those profiles eventually, but at present they do not. This is why the RAM's voltage, timings, AND frequency are identical to the one you claim is for Intel chips. For instance, I have a Crosshair III Motherboard, now look at this link:

 

http://www.corsair.com/configurator/product_results.aspx?id=1048893

 

When you scroll to the bottom you will find a list that includes the CMD4GX3M2A1600C8 memory option. Now, the Crosshair III is am AM3 motherboard, therefore only compatible with the Phenom II processors. So, how in the world could the motherboard support that memory (it being an AM3 board) and yet NOT be compatible? The answer is, they ARE compatible. Notice the only difference in the product name is that single letter? This is because they are identical RAM sticks, the only difference being one is meant to interface with a specific OPTION for Intel chips while the other is not. And, the only thing the Black Edition Memory Profiles are supposed to do is read a certain timing out of the box... so if you're planning on manually setting them it makes no difference.

 

In summary: Only IF you are planning on using Intel or AMD-specific profile OPTIONS should you be worried about choosing between the memory options. If you don't plan on doing that, then why would it make a difference.

 

I double-checked the motherboards again (after looking at a friend's AMD Phenom II system with the latest BIOS version), and found that the AMD-specific profiles do not currently exist on AMD motherboard BIOSes. Eventually, such support may be added via an update.

 

In addition, current AMD Phenom II memory controllers do not officially support memory speeds faster than DDR3-1333 (same as Socket 1156 Intel processors) - but in AMD's case, only two memory ranks (two single-ranked modules or one double-ranked module) per channel are officially supported at the DDR3-1333 speed; with four memory ranks per channel installed, AMD's official maximum supported memory speed is only DDR3-1066. Thus, if one chooses to use solely the SPD to auto-set the speed, voltages and timings, those would be the defaults. However, that does not stop the user from manually setting the speed to a higher speed than officially supported by the CPU manufacturer for a given memory configuration. Nor does it stop the user from manually setting the latency timings and voltages. The only thing that would stop the user from easily doing this would be if he had an OEM system using one of those processors -- in which case the system BIOS offers no manual memory settings at all.

 

Thus, if an "A" kit does not work properly on an AMD platform, I can safely say that there is either something else going on on that system or one of the modules in the kit is defective.

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I double-checked the motherboards again (after looking at a friend's AMD Phenom II system with the latest BIOS version), and found that the AMD-specific profiles do not currently exist on AMD motherboard BIOSes. Eventually, such support may be added via an update.

 

In addition, current AMD Phenom II memory controllers do not officially support memory speeds faster than DDR3-1333 (same as Socket 1156 Intel processors) - but in AMD's case, only two memory ranks are officially supported at the DDR3-1333 speed; with four memory ranks installed, AMD's official maximum supported memory speed is only DDR3-1066. Thus, if one chooses to use solely the SPD to auto-set the speed, voltages and timings, those would be the defaults. However, that does not stop the user from manually setting the speed to a higher speed than officially supported by the CPU manufacturer for a given memory configuration. Nor does it stop the user from manually setting the latency timings and voltages. The only thing that would stop the user from easily doing this would be if he had an OEM system using one of those processors -- in which case the system BIOS offers no manual memory settings at all.

 

Thus, if an "A" kit does not work properly on an AMD platform, I can safely say that there is either something else going on on that system or one of the modules in the kit is defective.

 

Quite right. In fact, if you browse on Newegg for those two different products, you'll notice that people who went with the "B" version had only one complaint: that these supposed "BEMP" or AMD-specific RAM profiles have no additional benefit at present time. In fact, the main complaint by everyone who went with version "B" for the additional $30 was that they wish they would have simply went with the "A" version because even the AMD-type has to be manually set. For me, I have the "A" version in my crosshair, and while it DOES default to 1333, so does the "B" version for those that chose to have it. All in all, you're just paying for an expensive FUTURE option, but not one that will actually effect performance... it's all just for convenience sake.

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Quite right. In fact, if you browse on Newegg for those two different products, you'll notice that people who went with the "B" version had only one complaint: that these supposed "BEMP" or AMD-specific RAM profiles have no additional benefit at present time. In fact, the main complaint by everyone who went with version "B" for the additional $30 was that they wish they would have simply went with the "A" version because even the AMD-type has to be manually set. For me, I have the "A" version in my crosshair, and while it DOES default to 1333, so does the "B" version for those that chose to have it. All in all, you're just paying for an expensive FUTURE option, but not one that will actually effect performance... it's all just for convenience sake.

 

Similar thing with my Socket 1366 Intel i7-920: The memory always defaults to 1066 unless I manually set the individual parameters or select the XMP profile. Socket 1156 Intel platforms default to 1066 with native DDR3-1066 parts (this includes most current performance memory modules advertised as 1333 speed, including most of the XMS3 series 1333-speed memory) or 1333 with native DDR3-1333 parts (this includes nearly all of Corsair's 1600-or-higher speed-advertised memory).

 

However, with that said, stretching out the memory speed beyond the maximum officially supported spec of the memory controller would not only decrease stability, but also might actually hurt the overall system performance by increasing the overall latency of the memory controller itself. As such, a stock-speed Socket 1366 non-EE Intel processor takes hardly any advantage whatsoever of memory speeds faster than 1066. The only reason why so-called "1600"-speed memory is cheaper than most of the "1333"-speed memory is that the native DDR3-1333 components which they use are at commodity prices right now while native DDR3-1066 parts are becoming harder to find.

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Users should ONLY select memory from the list that Wired has linked for Phenom II systems. Some of the kits on the Intel list will run but, AMD memory controllers have difficulty reach the rated speeds with them. That's why we published a list and also why we make different kits for AMD and Intel.

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Users should ONLY select memory from the list that Wired has linked for Phenom II systems. Some of the kits on the Intel list will run but, AMD memory controllers have difficulty reach the rated speeds with them. That's why we published a list and also why we make different kits for AMD and Intel.

 

If that is the case, then why is the alleged Intel-Only memory we're debating appearing on a qualified list for my motherboard (the Crosshair III) when that Motherboard is strictly AM3? That doesn't make sense... especially when the argument is about SPEED.. the speeds of the two RAM sets ("A" vs "B") are 100% identical (1600mhz; 8-8-8-24 and 1T). How could it be a Speed or Socket-Type issue? IF that type "A" RAM really is only for Intel chips, then aren't you misinforming people by putting it on a compatibility list for a motherboard that only support AMD CPUs? Also, why is it that people who have used the "B" type (AMD-specific, by your statement) are not getting this "BEMP" stuff to work at all? If there is such thing as BEMP, wouldn't that be something made by AMD itself? AMD has said nothing about such profiles existing... and those who have used the "B" type over the "A" type still have to manually set timings and speeds anyway.

 

Basically, if X Motherboard can only support Y CPU, and RAM Type Z is compatible with X Motherboard, it has to be compatible with Y CPU because having X Motherboard implies, by default, the use of Y CPU... get it?

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If that is the case, then why is the alleged Intel-Only memory we're debating appearing on a qualified list for my motherboard (the Crosshair III) when that Motherboard is strictly AM3? That doesn't make sense... especially when the argument is about SPEED.. the speeds of the two RAM sets ("A" vs "B") are 100% identical (1600mhz; 8-8-8-24 and 1T). How could it be a Speed or Socket-Type issue? IF that type "A" RAM really is only for Intel chips, then aren't you misinforming people by putting it on a compatibility list for a motherboard that only support AMD CPUs? Also, why is it that people who have used the "B" type (AMD-specific, by your statement) are not getting this "BEMP" stuff to work at all? If there is such thing as BEMP, wouldn't that be something made by AMD itself? AMD has said nothing about such profiles existing... and those who have used the "B" type over the "A" type still have to manually set timings and speeds anyway.

 

Basically, if X Motherboard can only support Y CPU, and RAM Type Z is compatible with X Motherboard, it has to be compatible with Y CPU because having X Motherboard implies, by default, the use of Y CPU... get it?

 

First, BEMP. AMD has not fully enabled BEMP on their end. We have provided them what they have asked of us but BEMP implementation is up to them.

 

As for the lists, some modules WILL in fact run just fine on both platforms. However, not all of them will which is why we provide 2 lists, 1 for each platform.

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First, BEMP. AMD has not fully enabled BEMP on their end. We have provided them what they have asked of us but BEMP implementation is up to them.

 

As for the lists, some modules WILL in fact run just fine on both platforms. However, not all of them will which is why we provide 2 lists, 1 for each platform.

 

Ok.. this still doesn't make sense to me. How can the RAM be compatible with an AMD-Only Motherboard, a motherboard which supports AM3, and NOT be compatible with a socket-AM3 CPU? If it's on the list you MUST have tested it, right? If you didn't use a phenom II processor during testing to verify it's compatibility with the Motherboard, what CPU did you use then? I wanna know because as far as I see that motherboard doesn't support anything else so how could you have tested it without using a Phenom II?? You also did not comment on why speed is an issue if the speeds are identical.

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Ok.. this still doesn't make sense to me. How can the RAM be compatible with an AMD-Only Motherboard, a motherboard which only supports AM3, and NOT be compatible with a socket-AM3 CPU? If it's on the list you MUST have tested it, right? If you didn't use a phenom II processor during testing, what CPU did you use then? I wanna know because as far as I see that motherboard doesn't support anything else so how could you have tested it without using a Phenom II??
I'm sorry but your question is confusing to me. To be clear, ONLY use the memory from the AMD list posted above and you'll be just fine.

 

You also did not comment on why speed is an issue if the speeds are identical.

Some of the modules on the Intel list will run at 1600 on Intel systems but will not reach 1600 on an AMD system. There is a conflict between the memory controller and the ICs used on the memory. The memory WILL run on an AMD system but it may or may not reach 1600. That's why we make 2 different versions of the same speed grade.
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I'm sorry but your question is confusing to me. To be clear, ONLY use the memory from the AMD list posted above and you'll be just fine.

 

Some of the modules on the Intel list will run at 1600 on Intel systems but will not reach 1600 on an AMD system. There is a conflict between the memory controller and the ICs used on the memory. The memory WILL run on an AMD system but it may or may not reach 1600. That's why we make 2 different versions of the same speed grade.

 

So in other words, just because it will run on the Crosshair doesn't mean it will run at the speeds stated? Does this also mean that in order to function properly, the RAM selected would have to be present on BOTH the CHIII list and the Phenom II list if we were running that configuration? For instance, if I got Ram model CMD8GX3M4A1333C7, a Phenom II-"ready" RAM, would it not work on the CHIII as it is now on the list even though it IS on the Phenom II list?

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Seems to me the biggest variable in matching components is the end users ability to adjust settings on their system to get the best performance and reliability. If one uses the recommended components this should be achievable with relative ease. If one chooses to use something else then they should have the ability to make the required adjustments and be satisfied with the results they achieve. I went with the recommended components and advice i got through the forums and have had no clitches.

A trouble free system that can be easily overclocked works for me.

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I do not know how to say this any clearer than this.

 

If you want memory for an AMD DDR3 system, get it from this page linked below.

 

http://www.corsair.com/products/phenomii/default.aspx

 

I understand that, but there are items on that list which do not exist on the Motherboard-specific list... it seems rational to be cautious of an item not included on the list for my motherboard even if it is on that CPU list.

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I understand that, but there are items on that list which do not exist on the Motherboard-specific list... it seems rational to be cautious of an item not included on the list for my motherboard even if it is on that CPU list.

 

I understand what you are saying. One cautious route in an event like this is to ask an employee of Corsair since lists or databases can contain errors. The memory on the page I linked is correct. ::pirate::

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I understand what you are saying. One cautious route in an event like this is to ask an employee of Corsair since lists or databases can contain errors. The memory on the page I linked is correct. ::pirate::

 

Thanks for your help. I did not mean to obfuscate things during the discussion.

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Thanks for your help. I did not mean to obfuscate things during the discussion.

 

I am happy you did. I am going to check the list I gave you and compare it to our motherboard results for your board and make sure that there are no errors. This is very important purchase also. You should be certain before spending your money. Have fun with the new build. ::pirate::

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I am happy you did. I am going to check the list I gave you and compare it to our motherboard results for your board and make sure that there are no errors. This is very important purchase also. You should be certain before spending your money. Have fun with the new build. ::pirate::

 

Thanks! I was particularly curious about the part number CMD8GX3M4A1333C7 as it appeared on the Phenom II list but not the Asus Crosshair III one. Thanks again.

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I am happy you did. I am going to check the list I gave you and compare it to our motherboard results for your board and make sure that there are no errors. This is very important purchase also. You should be certain before spending your money. Have fun with the new build. ::pirate::

 

any word on the

 

CMD8GX3M4A1333C7 ?

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I do not know how to say this any clearer than this.

 

If you want memory for an AMD DDR3 system, get it from this page linked below.

 

http://www.corsair.com/products/phenomii/default.aspx

 

Thanks! I was particularly curious about the part number CMD8GX3M4A1333C7 as it appeared on the Phenom II list but not the Asus Crosshair III one. Thanks again.

 

 

 

 

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=6597&stc=1&d=1267827349

 

You have answered your own question. I had no idea you were waiting on a reply. ::pirate::

1201412655_AMDPage.thumb.jpg.3f568830e66fbc0f8502e4d86e33f163.jpg

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attachment.php?attachmentid=6597&stc=1&d=1267827349

 

You have answered your own question. I had no idea you were waiting on a reply. ::pirate::

 

I only asked because a couple of posts ago you said that you needed to check on the discrepancy between the absence of that RAM in the Crosshair III list while it still exists on the Phenom II list...

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