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SSD problems in general


torns

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I want to buy SSD, but all I read is problems and problems... I didn't yet found anyone who didn't have problems with SSD.

Not just Corsair, any forum ALL have problems, it's like SSD technology is from last month and nobody knows anything... it's more stressful if you lose data..

 

are there any satisfied people ? What would you recommend to buy ? i want 128 GB of space, will have win7 64bit.

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I am perfectly happy with my P128. I run Windows 7 64bit and it has been working awesome for the past month.

 

I know you hear nothing but problems, but please remember that this is a new technology that most people, not even experts fully understand yet since it is so new.

 

Also, remember that two things influence current opinion. Some people tend to have expectations which are to high being that this is still technically and experimental technology or being that they are so expensive expect more.

 

I fully understand that paying so much is hard to swallow, but I also understand that I am taking a sort of risk being that this is such new tech.

 

Let me give you an example....The P128 for example has more than double the speed of a raptor HD. Yes, more than double the speed of a high performance HD. Ok, I look at somebody putting down the manufacturer because their SSD degraded to 150 from 190. Ok you have a point but 150 is still almost double a high performance HD. So basically yes it is slower but in the big scheme is it really? If your windows still loads in 15 seconds at both speeds what's the complaint? Ok so I use it for a year and it degrades to 100. Still ahead of the raptor.

 

Ok so then I have to wipe it and re-install the OS. Ladies and Gentleman, I re-install my OS every year. Over time Windows degrades with use due to several factors. Honestly SSD or no SSd the only way to keep a rig at top performance is to re-install the OS over even with an HD.

 

I think the problem is that a lot of people jump in to using this technology without properly researching or understanding it. I will give you a perfect example. I have a netbook and put an SSD in to speed it up and save battery. Being that it was a netbook, I went with a low end SSD which for your information still cost as much as the netbook. When I posted which SSD I was putting in they all started up on me that it was a low quality SSD which was slow and with no TRIM, etc. Now, what everybody forgot was that the system limitations weren't going to let it go any faster anyways! So my choice was to pay 200 bucks more for a P128 or get the same speed and pay less. Oh, and yes I did realize that it didn't have trim support so but like I said I can wipe it every year and I am still getting speeds above a Raptor or any other laptop HD for that matter.

 

Now on my desktop rig which is an i5, 4 gig, Radeon 4800 series, etc, I have a P128 and would not put the lower end SSD as it would bottle neck, but then again the speed is still faster than a raptor.

 

My point is it all depends on you. If you are willing to take the risk, do it but accept what comes along with it. Right now everyone is screaming for a new firmware and I bet 3/4 of those people don't even really know why they are. Everybody is yelling, we want new firmware with TRIM support when the P series already has something in place to do the same thing. Folks you won't know until we see some real world results. As a matter of fact TRIM Support may turn out a worse option. Like my father always says,"Be careful what you wish for." People are just throwing around terms and theories. There is no hardend facts on SSD tech and we won't have any for a few years to come as it matures and yes in a year or two it will cost half the price so if you are willing to wait then wait.

 

If you aren't willing to wait don't complain that you plopped down $700 on a 256gb SSD (Which probably cost more than your rig) when you could have waited until the tech finds it's way. Now if you plop down that money and are happy with it then that's all that matters.

 

Also remember with new tech will also come problems that need to be ironed out or quality control issues that need to be established. That is where risk comes in, but if you have a good company like Corsair RMA should make sure you don't end up with a $700 brick even though I understand it is frustrating. My suggestion when purchasing a SSD is to go with a reputable company in case you run accross quality control issues. Now if your like me that has just been lucky then count your blessings.....=P

 

Bottom line is I went SSD with my OS drive and will never go back! I'm too spoiled now.....

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Thank you for details, thats good to hear. One question when performance comes down with SSD, you need to re-install OS and then it comes up again ?

re-install is not major problem because I do it every year now like you said.

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There are several threads on this. Basically you have to do a hardware level wipe of the drive and then re-install the OS. There are several utilities that do the wipe. I believe one of the sticky topics in forums shows how to do it with a boot CD and GPARTED. There are also plenty of articles on the net that tell how to wipe an SSD. It has to be a hardware level wipe and not a software wipe that writes 0's to all the blocks.

 

Once you wipe (Clean the Drive) then you can re-install the OS.

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I also forgot to mention that degradation is on the write end. There are several posts here explaining why. The reason I bring this up is that many people buy SSDs like I said without fully understanding them and install write intense applications and then complain about degradation. At first it is awesome but doing stuff like video editing can degrade the performance. What you want to do is run the editing software off the SSD but write the video to another Drive. At this point I would only recommend installing only the OS and software on an SSD. If you are doing any write intensive applications write to another drive. I have a Caviar Black which is pretty fast and I put all my data on it.

 

Also, don't fill up the SSD. It is a good idea to keep at least 30%40% free space.

 

As the tech matures, I am sure it will reach a point where it doesn't matter.

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SSDs are the unexplored frontier for the general user - like Dragonx said, SSDs do great for write intensive applications but without the technology to properly maintain them, the only way to restore performance is through GParted or HDDErase.

 

There is also this unrealistic expectation that the drives will ALWAYS perform at that speed. This was not the case with mechanical hard drives and is definately not the case here. Even following some performance degradation, the drives will still work well beyond what you can get with a WD Raptor drive.

 

Torns, I was in the same position not too long ago. Everything I heard was mixed, but I took the plunge anyway and for me it paid off. My laptop screams and is holding her own. Write speeds have trailed off, but I use my P256 mostly for OS/Games and have a 320GB HDD for storing temp files, drivers, and my image that I made with Arconis.

 

I would love to get another one of these drives for my tower, but for now I'm quite content with the performance of both machines.

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Believe me SSD will be the best upgrade for your system! Once you use it, there is no way you going back to traditional hard disk.

Been using P128 for a few months and the condition is as good as day one. Also i purchased macbook air with SSD last year and the performance is still as good as new. According to my knowledge, Macbook air also using samsung ssd.

Why you read so many people complaining about SSD performance? Well, imho they won't write in forum if the perfomance is as good as advertised. They will when the performance is bad, but i believe the percentage is very small.

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People buying and using SSDs now are leading the way for future users togain a better experience with their computers. There is still a lot of work to be done to iron out the limitations of SSDs and to make sure future firmware releases are bang on and do what they are supposed to do without causing further problems.

 

The bottom line with regards to SSDs and whether you want one or not is whether you are prepared to weather the storms that invariably occur with cutting edge technology; if you are then you need to bolt down the hatches and be patient, if you are not then you would be better off sticking to spinning drives until all or most of the problems are sorted :-)

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First thanks all for good info, excellent stuff guys.

 

games I play on xbox360 :) so no worries there

btw, I need SSD for desktop/PC, not laptop.

 

I won't play game on SSD, as I use computer mostly for business, aka design and programming, mostly that is Adobe package, Photoshop, Fireworks, Flash, Flex, Dreamweaver... and of course internet browsing... video i rarely play, if I play it will surely have it on HDD as storage device, but I like "green" eco stuff, so would probably get WD Caviar Green (low noise/dba).

 

So, what would you guys recommend for this type of situation, PC, business(software you know which)? how should I work with SSD having all this in mind - if any tips appreciated.

which 128GB to take ?

 

I assume you rather recommend having win7 and program files in SSD and project files on hdd ? and it would NOT be recommended to put project file on SSD while working on it and the when done move it to hdd/storage ?

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Basically anything that *writes* to your SSD frequently move off to the spinning HDD, if it's something that writes infrequently then leave it alone - sometimes we tend to wrap our SSDs up in cotton wool and look at them as though they will break if we don't constantly keep an eye on them.

 

I use a lot of Adobe and Corel programs - the only thing I've done with regards my SSD is to move the temp/scratch files off to the spinning HDD and also my Outlook files as I receive hundreds of emails every day and they are written to whatever drive holds the Outlook file. Any other program that does similar move off to your spinning drive.

 

Have a look at the *Sticky* Windows 7 Tips & Tweaks and pick out the ones you feel will be of benefit to you. And yes, definitely go for Windows 7 (64bit if you have loads of memory and want to take advantage of it).

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Torns, I was one of those who had problems with the P128. Alas, I admit that it was my inexperience with the new technology that was the culprit. I researched my individual problems and solved them in fairly short order. I love it!

You have seen what others have said about the speed. I am using the P128 as my main drive, which has my OS (Win 7 Ult 64 bit) and a host of labor intensive apps like Photoshop CS3 and RealFlight installed on it. I also have 2, 1TB WD Caviar Black's for my other apps and storage.

 

Below are the test results between the two different drives using CrystalDiskMark 3.0 X64. The SSD truly smokes the competition:

 

Corsair P128 SSD:

 

Sequential Read : 223.792 MB/s

Sequential Write : 165.364 MB/s

Random Read 512KB : 169.097 MB/s

Random Write 512KB : 59.860 MB/s

 

WD Caviar Black 1TB HHD:

 

Sequential Read : 100.902 MB/s

Sequential Write : 100.506 MB/s

Random Read 512KB : 36.415 MB/s

Random Write 512KB : 62.911 MB/s

 

This drive is so fast, that I would compare moving in and out of apps and screens to changing channels on your satellite or cable TV!

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If you are gathering info via the forums, keep in mind that most people come to the forums for help, thus there is a problem. What you don't see are the hundreds or thousands more that don't have a problem or possibly don't even check the forums if they do have issues.

 

My experience has been with a P128 and the only problem I had was less than stellar write speed due to older firmware but it was still leaps and bounds faster than a high speed spinning hard drive. I don't think people would notice it unless they were testing for it. There are a few exceptions of course.

 

Once you get use to the super fast speed of a SSD, you will hate moving back to a spinning drive.

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I'm also a happy camper with my P128.

 

As the folks above explained, it depends on usage scenario and expectations. If you're not filling the SSD to the brim (i.e. can afford to leave about 30% - 40% of it empty) and not using applications which write extreme amounts of data on a regular basis (video editing, install a different 6GB game every week, have enough RAM so that the system isn't constatnly swapping memory to the page file, etc.) you should see good performance for a long time.

 

And also as explained above, a hardware erase (as in the GPARTED sticky thread) and reinstall fixes the problem.

 

Btw, one of the main factors why I went for an SSD mostly because I'm noise sensitive. Installing the drive did away the regular hum of mechanical hard drives and I could get rid of an extra fan. Working on a totally quiet computer is an almost eerie experience ...

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If you are gathering info via the forums, keep in mind that most people come to the forums for help, thus there is a problem. What you don't see are the hundreds or thousands more that don't have a problem or possibly don't even check the forums if they do have issues.

 

Yes I get the feeling that is the situation, then I'm ok, i'll get

 

Btw, one of the main factors why I went for an SSD mostly because I'm noise sensitive. Installing the drive did away the regular hum of mechanical hard drives and I could get rid of an extra fan. Working on a totally quiet computer is an almost eerie experience ...

 

I need speed because its easier to do business/work for me, noise is of course very welcome too.

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Installing the drive did away the regular hum of mechanical hard drives and I could get rid of an extra fan. Working on a totally quiet computer is an almost eerie experience ...

 

Amen to that! I love the quiet.

 

Noise was my main reason to get a SSD, faster system was my second, and third was because it's a new toy to play with.

 

I have a P256 here. Love it.

I'm jelouse, wish I could afford the P256.

 

So, what would you guys recommend for this type of situation, PC, business(software you know which)? how should I work with SSD having all this in mind - if any tips appreciated.

which 128GB to take ?

 

 

I sent my P128 in for an upgrade to the new firmware because I'm not certain it would be released for consumer upgrade any time soon. I don't feel like messing around with erasing the SSD periodically just to restore write performace. If you buy a SSD, check out if it supports TRIM or another method to keep things working well.

 

And since you were asking for a recommendation, the P128 works great. The X128 has a target sequential read speed a little higher than the P128 as well but if you don't have SATAII it won't make a difference, both will max out the SATA I connection and the P128 can be had at a lower price in general. I mention SATA because some computers in the office place still don't have SATA II connections, although yours may. My company replaces computers every 3-5 years so it's easy to get behind.

 

Last thing... There is no reason to use a spinning hard drive in your machine unless you just need the extra storage, key word is storage. You don't need to move temp files or whatever off the SSD. I didn't use one for 5 months but did use an external NAS to store extra data. You could use a USB external hard drive if you like. The point is, they work fine all by themselves. People are doing this as a reaction to not having the latest firmware (discussed above) so to extend the amount of time between erasing thier drives they use a spinning drive. It's a bandage and if you buy a new SSD just verify it supports TRIM. The lifespan of a SSD is 114 years of continuious operation.

 

I hope that helps some but by now you probably already have your mind made up on what, if any SSD you will buy.

 

Good Luck,

-Joe

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