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Gigabyte GA-P35-DQ6 + TWIN2X4096-8500C5x


jalyst

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Hi,

 

I've checked: http://www.corsair.com/testreports/report_list.aspx?partner_id=238134

And it makes no mention of testing TWIN2X4096-8500C5x range with this motherboard.

 

Can someone please confirm that this range of memory is okay to use?

I've checked Gigbyte's and they don't list some things that you guys confirm as working...

 

Also is it total overkill going for 1066 if I don't intend to OC much?

It depends what CPU it's paired with & if I'm doing a lot of something that would take advantage of added bandwidth right?

 

I can't recall exactly what my CPU is but it's naturally from the 'Core' microarchitecture family, is around 2Ghz, & it wouldbe a Core2Duo Alendale or Conroe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core_%28microarchitecture%29#Desktops

 

Finally is the TWIN2X4096-8500C5x range your best for this platform?

And do the different letters in front of -8500C5 simply represent a gradual improvement in cooling?

 

Thanks!

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Hi Corsair support just bumping this one...

 

It would've been posted in your least busy time in the US...

And it'll prolly get drowned out as everything gradually (then frantically) picks up in the next few hours.

Whilst I'm counting roos! :D:

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Thanks, well overdue for bed (4am) just this now...

 

Can someone please confirm that this range of memory is okay to use?

I've checked Gigbyte's and they don't list some things that you guys confirm as working...

 

Finally is the TWIN2X4096-8500C5x range your best for this platform?

And do the different letters in front of -8500C5 simply represent a gradual improvement in cooling?

 

 

 

night

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Finally is the TWIN2X4096-8500C5x range your best for this platform?

Yes, that info is in the link I have already given you in the Hexus thread.

 

 

And do the different letters in front of -8500C5 simply represent a gradual improvement in cooling?[/i]

 

No, the TWIN2X4096 has nothing to do with cooling. This indicates that it is a 2 module kit of DDR2 with a total capacity of 4096MB. As far as cooling, you have a choice of our original XMS spreaders or the Dominators.

 

Find all the info here under the MEMORY tab or by using the MEMORY FINDER:

 

http://www.corsair.com/

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Yes, that info is in the link I have already given you in the Hexus thread.

 

Yes of course was sleep fatigued thanks. I will add the url to this thread...

 

No, the TWIN2X4096 has nothing to do with cooling. This indicates that it is a 2 module kit of DDR2 with a total capacity of 4096MB. As far as cooling, you have a choice of our original XMS spreaders or the Dominators.

 

No I'm asking what the letters after -8500C represent & whether the TWIN2X4096-8500C5x range is "king dick" (for my cpu type)

I realise what TWIN2X4096 is meant to represent.

 

Thanks

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Hi,

 

I can't recall exactly what my CPU is but it's naturally from the 'Core' microarchitecture family, is around 2Ghz, & it wouldbe a Core2Duo Alendale or Conroe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core_%28microarchitecture%29#Desktops

 

I'm not familiar with the expression you are using. And, I can't be too specific with an answer you don't have your exact CPU listed or in your dropdown specifications. But, again, the info you need is in the Memory Finder result.

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Please let us know if you have any more questions!

 

Are TWIN2X4096-8500C5x sticks the highest performing memory for my CPU type?

According to configurator there's only two performance levels so I'm guessing the answer is yes.

 

http://www.corsair.com/configurator/product_results.aspx?id=160724

 

If I decide to under-clock my system slightly, is it possible to also under-clock TWIN2X4096-8500C5x sticks and subsequently lower their latency?

Again I'm guessing yes, but it's been a long time since I've done any OC'ing or under-clocking.

 

Cheers

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I thought the effective FSB for my generation of CPU was only 1066Mhz (or 4x 266)

So for a 1:1 (I/O bus cock of 266) the most anyone ever needed was DDR2-533?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR2_SDRAM

 

So why would one need: 667, 800, or 1066Mhz DDR-2?

Is it purely for running at higher effective FSB's or CPU clocks?

 

If yes, aside form bragging rights, in what usage scenarios is this useful?

 

Incidentally I bought no name DDR2-800 at the time I bought my CPU.

As it was suggested there'd still be a benefit, despite no tweaking from default settings.

 

Perhaps I should consider a newer Core2; faster FSB and quad core?

Don't really want to spend hundreds extra though...

 

Cheers

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Why was my bump removed?

If you're going to take the time to remove a bump then take the time to respond plz.

And at least leave a sig saying who did it and why...

It's not unreasonable to bump within 24hrs after getting no response for 5-days...

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  • Corsair Employees

The TWIN2X4096-8500C5DF would be the highest performance DDR2 memory which we still manufacture. We can only guarantee that the memory would run at the settings at which they are tested which would be 2.1v, 1066MHz, 5-5-5-15. Lowering the frequency may allow you to lower the latency, but you would need to test it to find out for sure.

 

A lot of people run with a 1:2 ratio so with a 266MHz FSB the mem clock would be 533MHz (DDR1066). Running with DDR1066 will be helpful if you are looking to overclock your CPU, because it will give you more flexibility to run at different ratios. For pure memory performance higher frequency gives you more bandwidth. When it comes to overclocking you may need to play around with the ratios and frequencies in order to find the optimal settings for your specific setup.

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Thank-you!

 

So DDR2-1066 is advantageous if I want higher default FSB & or CPU clock-speed?

And this results in higher memory bandwidth which is useful in what 'real world' applications?

 

Would I be best considering a 'Core' CPU with a higher default FSB than 266?

Or can I still get just as much out of 1066 with my current CPU?

 

Please try not to take longer than 5-days to respond, I've got some serious time constraints atm.

Now I "really" must go to bed, thanks again!..

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  • Corsair Employees

Here is a link to our lab tests, where you will be able to compare the difference between DDR800 and DDR1066 on your specific motherboard:

 

PC8500 - http://www.corsair.com/testreports/report_print.aspx?r_id=197549&p_id=160729&m_id=12455

 

PC6400 - http://www.corsair.com/testreports/report_print.aspx?r_id=194072&p_id=160729&m_id=9716

 

Whether or not you would notice a difference in real world performance is hard to say. As an example, some people swear they can hear a difference between 128kbps and 192kbps MP3 files, while others can't. I really could not comment on the absolute ideal FSB to memory ratio, because different systems may run better with slightly different settings, which depend on the BIOS, the chipset, etc. If you plan to overclock I would go with the 8500 because it would give you more flexibility, but if you are going to install the memory and never play with any of the settings then the 6400 would be just fine.

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Thanks Ram Guy for getting back to me a little quicker this time, tis appreciated.

 

I'm asking if you can think of applications where the added bandwidth resulting from OC'ing is advantageous, perhaps transcoding etc?

Not typical usage scenarios where telling the difference would be highly questionable at best.

 

The only reason I ask should I be considering another CPU...

Is because I'm wondering whether the current one would become too much of a limiting factor with 1066.

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The added bandwidth would be beneficial in every application, however it may or may not be all that noticeable. Upgrading the CPU would be a matter of opinion, if you have a 266MHz FSB CPU then I would not say that upgrading would be necessary in order to get the most out of the memory, but obviously a faster CPU will always give you better performance. If you had a 200MHz FSB CPU, then in that case upgrading the CPU would be more beneficial when trying to run with 1066MHz memory.
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  • 1 month later...

Hey guys, just some final questions on this...

I'm about to buy 1x TWIN2X4096-8500C5D, if it tests well I'll buy another one.

 

Are there any known issues with stability if I try to add more than 4GB

with this MB? (8GB is addressable with the right BIOS)

 

I intend to use Ubuntu so there won't be any memory addressing issues.

I don't think Windows 7 has that problem either, t'was only XP as I recall?

 

Cheers,

Jed

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