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Best Practice: Server OS on SSD (Swap file etc)


jimwillsher

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I've ordered a P64 SSD to host Windows 2008 R2 on a DIY-built server. The OS will sit on the SSD, and all the data will be on a 4-disk RAID5 Seagate array (7200 RPM discs).

 

Once Server 2008 R2 is installed, the SSD should be fairly static since it won't be getting lots of writes. However things like the swapfile will be constants read/write cycles.

 

Should I keep the swapfile on the SSD for performance, or will that gradually eat away at the life of my SSD? Should I instead move the swapfile to the RAID array? Simialrly with the windows TEMP location.

 

I chose 2008 R2 as it supports TRIM, but from what I can gather from this forum the release of TRIM in Server 2008 RTM (which I have from MSDN) is somewhat ahead of Corsair's support for the function.

 

Suggestions welcome. Many thanks.

 

 

 

Jim

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Jim, I can't answer your question yet as I am not that far in the book. I have also built a server for my Fall 09 Server 2008 class (I backed away from the SSD idea for now). Class starts Aug 27th,lets keep in touch with Server developments. I will take a look at your question (lots going on with classes starting.

 

I made and am hosting a web site (using IIS)still developmental. Its hard to do anything else other than assigned projects.

 

My water cooled gamer stits here on the table waiting parts but even when they come I must figure out how much time I can safely devote to it.

 

Taking 12 credit hrs. Server 2008, HTML Design,American History and Apple Hardware (required for Adobe classes).

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  • Corsair Employees

There are several ways it could be done but what way would be the best will be trial and error, and with any new O.S. that is still in beta it more complicated.

However, the Boot drive as an SSD drive with the swap file on that drive and the O.S. installed to another drive may offer the best performance.

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Many thanks. I will make the SSD the boot drive and run Win from that. And looking at the Microsoft KB article, leaving the pagefile on the SSD should fine.

 

Sad to see you refer to 2008 R2 as being Beta though, since it's RTM and will not change between now and October 22nd, just like Win 7. There's a lot of folks running Win7 RTM just now, all sitting waiting for Corsair to play catchup with TRIM.

 

 

Jim

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Pretty much, yes. It "feels" better that 2008, and it seems to be a bit more memory efficient. it also supports TRIM.

 

As I have the P64 it doesn't support TRIM (the Extreme was out of stock when I ordered). Everything is installed and running fine (and fast!).

 

Jim

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Sorry, but you are wrong. Perhaps you are taking an official Corsair stance, or perhaps this is your personal stance. But you are wrong.

 

Who buys boxed software anymore?

 

Windows 2008 R2 and Windows 7 are not beta. They are final, released to manufacturing, and WILL NOT CHANGE BETWEEN NOW AND 22nd OCTOBER.

 

We've clearly reached the end of the line in this thread, and I fully expect the mods to delete this post. But you are very wrong to say that it is beta as it is not beta. It is final. Final. Final. Final.

 

I quote from the Official MSDN blog:

 

"Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 RTM.

We see that everyone seems to be getting their bits and keys ok for Windows 7. Demand has been phenomenal, and WWW traffic overall today very high, so speeds may be a bit slower than you are used to."

 

(That was posted August 6th)

 

So, forget all this nonsense about beta and OEM. Please just address the issue here - TRIM needs to be implemented. Windows 7 and 2008 R2 are not beta. The only thing that's beta is Corsair's implementation approach.

 

 

Jim

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Quite possibly, and I did suspect that.

 

To say something like "we expect to have a solution for when W7 is generally available on October 22nd, but cannot comment until then" would be constructive and helpful. But to say that something is beta until there's a boxed copy is wrong and misleading. And quite what the OEM bit has to do with anything I do not know.

 

 

Jim

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I have my Server 2008 DVDs in hand (one 32 and one 64 bit). They just say Windows Server 2008 on them (came with textbook for class)When I load I will look for a diffferent number than the R2 version I got through download.

 

Professsor looked at me a little odd (and so did rest of class) when I asked if it was Beta. Can you imagine a College teaching a class about a Beta version? These guys don't respond so fast.

 

I bought a 1500 page book from Microsoft. "Server 2008 Inside Out". No mention about "2008 is still beta so dont expect all these solutions to work when final version comes out".

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PCCstudent

The software you are using is considered Beta and as such would not be supported even by the O.S. developer. And I am sorry I have stated several times that nothing can be done until the official release of the software. Even then I have no information yet officially as to what will happen specifically when it is released. I have also stated previously in another thread:

Bottom Line if you want Trim support or that is the requirement then go with our Extreme series drives other wise if you are not using Windows 7 or do not need Trim support IE any other O.S. then our Performance Series may be the best option. Both have great performance and either would work great in almost any configuration.
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R2 is just a new revision. Kinda like a .5 release.

 

In the case of Windows 7, that's not true. "R2" releases up until now have been value-add releases that provide features - usually for pay or as part of Quality Assurance licenses.

 

But with the release of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, this is a brand-new Server SKU based exclusively on the Windows 7 platform specifically for Servers. The naming is very confusing for that reason, but "R2" in this case is a brand new Server - nothing like the "R2"s from the past.

 

http://blogs.technet.com/windowsserver/archive/2008/08/18/windows-server-7-aka-windows-server-2008-r2.aspx

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dugn

That is not the issue, please keep to the topic at hand.

And I am sorry I have already stated what I can and cannot say!

 

Respectfully, this is related. Windows 7 comes with specific support for SSDs. If Windows Server 2008 R2 was just an add-on to Windows Server 2008, then there would be no specific SSD support.

 

But since it's the Server SKU for Windows 7, it does come with support specifically for SSDs. So Windows Server 2008 R2 will provide SSD support that the Server 2008 SKU will not - which makes it an excellent platform to use SSDs.

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