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Extended Sustained Write, Heavy Usage (Video Capture)


bakkuu

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Hello,

 

I have a P128GB on the way arriving on tomorrow (EXCITED!!) and I wanted to get some information on usage for this SSD. I was wondering if the SSD will be fine for the specific application I want to use it for. I am asking because I was using another SSD and it died after a while of using it like this.

 

I will be capturing uncompressed video on the P128 at about 125 MB/sec, and the SSD is the only way for me to be able to make my system work. Is the P128/P256 safe for this type of heavy sustained usage? Pretty much the disk would be constantly writing and I am afraid the controller will overheat ,corrupt data, i/o errors, etc... There are cameras that shoot direct to NAND MLC cards and they work fine. I've never had this kind problem with HDD's so I am hoping that the P128/P256 can work.

 

Here is a scenario of the workflow, record video until disk is full (WRITE) and then move disk to another computer to offload (READ) and then bring it back to the capture system and then capture more video. What would this kind of usage do to the lifespan of the disk?

 

What about handling the drive a lot? Is it okay to constantly handle the SSD and move from Computer/Enclosure/Bay to Computer/Enclosure/Bay in regards to static electricity, etc...

 

Would a fan on the SSD help at all with heat to relieve any problems that may arise?

 

Sorry for so many questions, I am trying to build my system and if the P128/P256 work great I will be using them exclusively for my systems.

 

Thank You!

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I have not seen anything that would indicate that one could "overuse" the drive and cause it to fail prematurely. Heat should not be an issue with the drive, it only consumes 1.5w of power and runs very cool. Also the drive has no moving parts, so its actually ideal for use in a mobile system or as an external/hot-swappable drive.
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From a business / IT perspective (and assuming your inital runs with it work as you need / want it to), you may want to keep extras that aren't used on hand for a worst case scenario. Similar to keeping extra HDDs on hand in a server room in the rare case one dies. Maximum up time and all that.

 

Yes, paranoia pays off in the IT world :)

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From what i know, flash memory doesn't like being written on and will eventually wear out.

 

If this happens though, no data is lost. That sector can no longer be written to, but reading is no problem so your SSD will just mark that part and move your data off of it.

 

In the long term you'll lose some storage space, but no data.

 

Don't quote me on that though. And Corsair guys, memory gurus, please do correct me if i'm wrong.

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you should Buy an HDD for Writing a lot of data to all the time the WD green (32mb) are very good for media tasks considering they only spin at around 5700 they are also quite, buy the SSD (S/P128 or P256) for the boot drive and HDD for large files and constant writes unless you need the High Write speed of the P128 or P256

 

From what i know, flash memory doesn't like being written on and will eventually wear out.

 

If this happens though, no data is lost. That sector can no longer be written to, but reading is no problem so your SSD will just mark that part and move your data off of it.

 

In the long term you'll lose some storage space, but no data.

 

Don't quote me on that though. And Corsair guys, memory gurus, please do correct me if i'm wrong.

 

thats how it should be implemented but not sure if any SSD has been done that way (make the SSD smaller when bad block is found)

 

RAM GUY you ask your support to ask samsung does it do that with the firmware, be nice to know if it does

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Another brand's ssd which is the same as the corsair P series(re badged samsung ssd) shows these specs for endurance.

64gb 35.1 yrs @ 50GB write-erase/day

128gb 70.1 yrs @ 50GB write-erase/day

256gb 140.2 yrs @ 50GB write-erase/day

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leexgx

thats how it should be implemented but not sure if any SSD has been done that way (make the SSD smaller when bad block is found)

The Flash controller will control this and would be transparent to the O.S. So unless a large number of blocks start to fail I doubt you will ever notice it as there are some spare blocks in the drive in the drives should it have a failing block or even a few the sive available will not change.

The MTBF is 1,000,000 hours for most of these drives and for all of our drives we have ATM so using the drive every day 24-7 I doubt it would fail in our normal lifetime of use that would be 117 Years. So I think most of us would not last that long. But who knows maybe they will find a cure for old age. ;-)

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