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De-Ionized or Distilled?


JenBell

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:[pouts: So I went to all my local shops and garages (which were totally useless, kept trying to come on to me...ewwww) and all I could find was "ionized" water. in the manual they say "distilled" in bold so er...is there a difference between the 2 apart from the method in which they are purified? I have seen one review of the 200ex where he used ionized but the majority used distilled. Talked to my old engineering teacher and he said there is no difference, only minor diff is that distilled is considered to be slightly more pure...Can someone put my mind to rest. I can get hold of distilled but I will have to go on a mission. I am free on Sat so if anyone could respond by then I would really appreciate it. Ta,., Sonata case, Zalman 400w PSU, 2800+ will be upgraded to 2500m on Monday, GA-7NNXP, 36Gb Raptors Raid 0, 160+250Gb Hitachi's (no cats here), 1GB Corsair PC4400, 9800XT Asus, Sony 4x DVD-RW, Asus CDRW 52x, Liteon DVD-rom (ripping only), Audigy 2 with 6.1 setup, USR Wi-Fi 100MB. Displayed by 2x Iiyama E431S's. Hunting for additonal serial port pci card.
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I believe DI water has a greater level or purity compared to distilled water. DI is used in lab environments, distilled will keep your steam iron from clogging up with mineral deposits. Distilled is more than sufficient for water cooling. Good luck. KK
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[quote name='Kooler King']I believe DI water has a greater level or purity compared to distilled water. DI is used in lab environments, distilled will keep your steam iron from clogging up with mineral deposits. Distilled is more than sufficient for water cooling. Good luck. KK[/QUOTE] Sorry to seem a pendant, but thats the exact oposite way round. Distillation is an expensive process, which can result in almost 100% H2O. De-ionisation is a much cheaper process, using electricity to remove the ionised molecules. However, it will not remove any neutral molecules from your water. Hence less pure. However, non-ionised molecules won't corrode your system (read a chemistry book, I cba to explain the detail), so go for whichever you can find. For the purposes of WC they are all good.
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Hmmm no mr.monkey. You must be confused. DI water is FAR more pure water that distilled. That would be why DI water is more expensive. It is a lot more complex that just "electricity" to make DI water. DI water is made through reverse osmosis (best filtration prcess know to man), ION exchangers, activated carbon filtration, and sometimes UV light. You see, when minerals dissolve in water they produce ions....so removing these ions (DI water) is effectively removing the impure minerals and creating water more pure that just distilled. And the non-ionised water will corrode metals if you change your water frequently. The DI water will be hungary for ions and it will grab them from the 1st source it finds which is usually metal. Many people will infact tell you to avoid DI water for this very property. So, KK you were right :) Maybe monkey got distilled and DI mixed up? :confused:
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No, I am not mistaken. At university I used DI, as it is much cheaper than distilled water. You are correct to state that one type of DI can be very pure (known as dual reverse osmosis technique (RO)), using the nanopure ion trapping system. This will be very expensive, but then you can't buy it day to day. It's really only available to labs and the like. It is still rivaled in purity by pressure controlled distillation. However the electricity cost of the latter is huge if you are producing m^3 of it. DI you can buy will use anion and cation exchange resins. Very cheap, and not comparable to the purity a standard distillation still will give you. Just to point out the basics: DI is a process, but if you distill water, you remove all the ions (and all other non-ionic material). Hence distillation does produce DeIonised water. So it can be easy to get confused. Like all things, it's not a cut and dry (pun intended) subject. Any any of the above will do in a watercooler.
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In any case, distilled water is available, cheaply, at your local supermarket. I'm not going to re-enter the DI - distilled debate, but suffice it to say either is a more appropriate choice than "Aquafina", which I have seen being taughted as "purer" than either in posts in other forums ... we need to be diligent to keep such "junk science" out of this forum. :laughing: KK
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Not true....otherwise distilled water would be called De-Ionized water at the supermarket and be much cheaper than distilled water. In reality it is the exact opposite. ANYWAY. What is important is that distilled water is a better choice over DI because 1) it is cheaper 2) easier to find 3) potentially less corrosive if you like to change water often.
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Well, as long as you dont go and get carbonated mineral water, and start screaming about how it messed up... Yes, i have actually seen a guy do that... how scary aint that... B!
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Well here is what I can add from personal testing. The "cleaner" or more pure water is the higher the resistance within that water. These measurements were taken with a multimeter with probs one inch appart. Water Resistance: Tap in Oklahoma City (tastes like dirt, leaves a red ring in tubs and toilets): 112 K ohms Same water through my Pur water filter (heavily used): 226 K ohms Distilled (Walmart, Distilled water from Little Rock Ak, these people are probably getting their water from the Ozarks): 513 k ohms Deionized: 15.5 M ohms My DVM is not going to be accurate with a result this high. I might repost later with a result from a megaohm meter at work. Personal knowledge: Distilled water is made very cheaply. You can make it your self with a pot boiling pot of water with a lid. Leave it boil for 2 minutes (depending on the boil temperature) gently lift up the lid and look at the inside of it. Distilled water!! For this to be pure though you must boil the water at waters exact boiling point. Otherwise other particles in the water may be takin with it. At any rate some particles will be taken regardless. This is why I only came out with a 513k result on this. Now for deionized water. Do you know how gold plating works? How about the Ionic Breeze? Uhm... maybe why the dust sticks to your TV or monitor?The process used to purify water works on a similar premise. Run a current through conductive rods or material and contaminents will stick to it. This works especially well with water because of it's chemical makeup. Ofcourse ther is allot more to the end product then just this. At any rate when you go to purchase water look at it's lables. The more filtration (if they list it) the better. The more pure the water, the less corrosion and better chance of your computer surviving a leak. More information: [url]http://www.overclockers.com/articles993/[/url] It's a little drawn out but I'd say well worth your time if your looking to liquid cool but not a chemist. Lol. Yes, it is rather expensive but if I'm going to spend money on a system I'd like a little insurance or chance it'll survive incase of a leak. Then again some people are happy with Aquafina, distilled and these arn't bad to use either Good luck.
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Sorry for the science junk Kooler King. Just giving some info. But becareful. Isn't saying things like kilobyte, gallons per minute, megahert, volts and cubic feet per minute considered "science junk"? Ouch, I'll change my signature to "I gotta big white box and a pretty little box with a window. They go really fast."
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[quote name='YoueatLard'] Personal knowledge: Distilled water is made very cheaply. You can make it your self with a pot boiling pot of water with a lid. Leave it boil for 2 minutes (depending on the boil temperature) gently lift up the lid and look at the inside of it. Distilled water!! For this to be pure though you must boil the water at waters exact boiling point. Otherwise other particles in the water may be takin with it. At any rate some particles will be taken regardless. This is why I only came out with a 513k result on this. [/QUOTE] YoueatLard, After watching the science channel recently, isn't distilled water made by the evaporative water (the steam) collected and cooled? Not just taking the lid off and looking down into a pot of boiled water. The web site of HowStuffWorks.com mentions: "Steam distilled water is the standard by which all other waters are measured. Not only is distillation one of the most effective forms of treatment, but it is also one of the easiest to understand: untreated water is converted into water vapor, which is then condensed back into liquid form. Almost all of the contaminants are left behind in the boiling chamber, with the condensed water being virtually contaminant-free. Anyone who has accidentally let a pot of water boil completely out on the stove is familiar with this process, and familiar with the crust of contaminants typically left behind after the water is gone. ... ... In nature, this basic process is responsible for the hydrologic cycle. The sun causes water to evaporate from surface sources such as lakes, oceans, and streams. The water vapor eventually comes in contact with cooler air, where it re-condenses to form dew or rain. This process can be imitated artificially, and more rapidly than in nature, using alternative sources of heating and cooling" Stev
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I don't think that LArd was suggesting that is how distilled water is manufactured en masse. I've worked in a physics lab that required very pure water for some laser experiments, and there are many different grades of each, both Distilled and De-ionised. De-ionised is cheaper than distilled for a similar level of purity. It's because de-ionising it does not require heating the water to boiling point. But at the end of the day, high grade distilled water has less than 100 ppb impurites. Dual RO can only manage about 1ppm
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Mr.Monkey, There are some people who tend to plant life that place a bucket of water out over night to allow the fluoride and chlorine to out gas. They call this a CHEAP distilled water process. When reading that, I now understand how hoax e-mails are started on the internet. So, looking at a pot of hot water only brought this into mind again. :laughing: If people read the post believing that one can look down into a hot pot of water and think that it is distilled water, when it is not, there would be more problems to life than a dead HC water-cooling unit. :bigeyes: Maybe you can leave out a pot of water over night to out gas some gases, maybe not. BUT you can NOT call this distilled water without the vapor being condensed and collected. Thus, as Kooler King mentioned, "no junk science" please. Warranties can be voided really fast. :sigh!: Stev
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Stev, Lard did actually mean the water that has condensed onto the lid of the pot. Not the water inside the pot. Which is actually how distilled water is manufactured. Evaporation and condensation. I hope this clears up any misunderstanding.
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Yes, as Mr. Monkey suggested I was only giving an example. This was ment to show why your average distilled water would be cheaper then average deionized. In the same token I guess I should insure that people are not trying to make their own deionized water so.... NOTE: DO NOT try to make your own deionized water by throwing your TV, Ionic breeze, or any other electrical device into water. This will lead to general unhappiness, destroyed hardware, and possibly a trip to the hospital or morgue. Also yes, I did mean the condensation on the lid of the pot. And although you could make your own distilled water by the boiling water and collecting the condensation I do not recommend this. Each time you would open the pan you would contaminate the condensation on the lid. The air in and outside is by no means clean (looked inside your computer lately?). Also whatever you are collecting the water into most likely has soap or other residue in it (unless you scower it a couple of times with extremely pure alchohol). At anyrate distilled water is easy to come by and cheap to buy. Next, yes you can place water in a bucket for a time to allow chemicals that man put in (like fluoride and chlorine as Stev said) but this is ofcourse by no means distilling the water. It is done because these are bad for plants. Yes, chlorine is corrosive and you want it gone but you also don't want dirt, lime, or whatever you complain about your water tasting like. Not only can these collect any lightly cause resistance but also corrosion. Also leaving water out for chemicals to evaporate will allow biological life and other contaminates in. Thats bad "juju". So don't do it. Ahright, have I covered all the bases yet? Lol sorry guys, next time I'll be more specific. Thank you Mr. Monkey for the translations.
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