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Windows XP can not turn off computer


ra8656

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Just installed TX750 into Asus socket A motherboard... a few years old. The system can hibernate fine by pushing power button one time on case but if I select "turn off" computer via the start menu in windows, the system begins to shut off and gets there, but then powers back up again.

Advice?

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Make sure you have the latest BIOS installed for the board and then load setup defaults in the BIOS and see if you still have the same problems. The older socket A motherboards were mostly designed to meet older ATX specs (ATX12v 1.3) so there could be some glitches when using a PSU that meets the newest ATX specs.
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I've verified I have the latest BIOS version for the motherboard. So I have no options here. This was not an issue with the PSU that I upgraded from.

 

1.)Wouldn't it make sense that when you produce a PSU to conform to a new ATX standard that it should be backward compatible with old ATX standards?

 

2.) I'd like to verify that there is no defect within the TX750 that I bought. Could this be? Why would the system be able to hibernate and shut down but not turn off when asked? What's different between the two functions with respect to the PSU?

 

Thanks

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1.)Wouldn't it make sense that when you produce a PSU to conform to a new ATX standard that it should be backward compatible with old ATX standards?

Our PSUs are backwards compatible to ATX12v 2.01 and newer specifications. With spec 2.0 the -5 volt rail was eliminated and the 12v rail became the main rail where high power components draw there power from. In version 1.3 the 5v rail is what powered your video card and CPU. Unfortunately it is not possible to build a PSU which would be compatible with both specs.

 

2.) I'd like to verify that there is no defect within the TX750 that I bought. Could this be? Why would the system be able to hibernate and shut down but not turn off when asked? What's different between the two functions with respect to the PSU?

From what you describe it does not sound like the PSU is defective, I would suspect the motherboard and or BIOS is looking for certain things that are not present on our PSU (or any 2.0+ PSU) and the PSU is not properly receiving a power down signal. If possible I would test the PSU in a different system and see if you can duplicate the same issues just to be sure. If at any point it looks like the PSU may be defective or not operating properly then we can replace it for you, however a compatibility issue is more likely in this case.

 

To have the unit replaced you can use the On Line RMA Request Form and we will be happy to replace it. Be sure to check the box that says “I've already spoken to Technical Support and/or RAM Guy.”

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In my motherboard manual I can not find what ATX standard it was designed to but I can clearly see that it has a pin for the -5V on the ATX power supply connector. This pin looks to be a no connect from the PSU standpoint.

Could this be the issue?

Can I keep using this PSU given this condition?

Should I change to a different model?

Thanks

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There should not be any risk of damaging any components by using the PSU with the system, its just that the motherboard is not communicating the proper shut down information to the PSU, and its not turning off completely. Although I would suspect that your other components are being shut off and then restarted as if you had selected "restart" from the Start menu.
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Okay, I've reconnected my old PSU and it shuts down just fine every time. The interesting thing I noticed was that the old PSU doesn't have a -5V plug either. So that proves that it has nothing to do with this.

 

So at this point I am really concerned that the PSU may be defective. My thoughts before were... okay so I can't shut down... well I'll just hibernate for now. Then x number of years from now, when I buy a new up to date motherboard, the PSU will be 100% compatible. But now I can't know that for sure.

 

Is there a way you can send me another PSU so I can test it out? If it works or doesn't work then I'll know one answer or the other? Or any other suggestions?

 

I'ver tried running in safe mode and that works and some times doesn't work just like when running windows xp in normal mode... sometimes it shuts down sometimes it restarts.

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I would test the current PSU in a different system if possible, but if all else fails then we can try replacing the unit for you. You can use the On Line RMA Request Form and we will be happy to replace it. Be sure to check the box that says “I've already spoken to Technical Support and/or RAM Guy.”

 

If a component in the PSU had failed I would suspect that the issue would be very consistent and would be easily duplicated. This issue sounds more like the board and PSU are not communicating properly and it's likely that the motherboard is built to an older ATX spec. You may want to contact the motherboard manufacturer and see if they can tell you what spec it was designed for.

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I'm having difficulty getting ASUS to tell me what version of the ATX standard the board was designed to. They just tell me that it is ATX standard and should work with all modern ATX power supplies. Can you briefly describe for me what signals I should probe and what the expected signals should look like should I be able to grab an oscope from work and probe the PSU connectors? Still having difficulty finding another system to try it out on.

Thanks

Jayme

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I took a look at the website but it said nothing about the process of shutting the supply down. Am I oversimplifying things in saying that all the motherboard does to turn the PSU off is just drive the PS_ON pin high? Or possibly use a switch to disconnect GND from PS_ON?

Thanks

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The PSU is not able to turn on by itself, it needs to get a signal from the motherboard in order to do so. The same is true with shutting the PSU down, it is entirely controlled by the motherboard. Here is a link to the official ATX spec for version 2.01 which is what our PSUs are designed to meet:

 

http://www.formfactors.org/developer%5Cspecs%5CATX12V%20PSDG2.01.pdf

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I wanted to follow up with some sort of resolution that I found last night. I gave the PSU to a friend to try on his system and it worked fine ( he tried to power cycle the system 3 times, had it been me I would have done it 10 times given the inconsistency of the failure ). Anyhow, I borrowed a hard drive from someone and reinstalled Windows on it and booted with this drive. Under this condition, the PSU would not fail. I plug in my old hard drive and boot to windows and bam... it fails to shut down on the first go. So I have two variables now, something is wrong with my hard drive and more likely to be root cause, a software difference. What puzzles me is...say there is a software/driver that is loaded that is causing the issue, why does my old PSU not have an issue? Do you have suggestions on most likely candidates that are causing the issue? I really don't want to reinstall windows. Thanks.
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On the hard drive that is working, let the system boot up and go to your control panel and find the "Power Options" section. Open it up and see how the configuration on the working drive differs from the configuration on the drive you are having problems with, and see if changing some of the options around helps resolve the problem.
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