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So i got a replacement TX850 today & the 12v rail drops even lower !!!


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i got the shop to replace my first TX850 becuase the 12v rail was unstable under any kind of load (medium or heavy) so i fitted the new replacement today hoping that the first one was just a faulty unit & to my shock the 12v rail on the replacement unit is dropping to even lower than the first one !! i'm very unhappy with the quality of these power supplies.

 

the first one would drop to 11.60v but the new one goes even lower to 11.54v :mad:

 

UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE

 

Today i received my Multimeter from ebay ( cheap & mini ) & i have tested the 12v Rail & the 5v Rail & Results are As Follow:

 

12v idle 12.07v to 12.08v

 

5v tested & its 5.14v to 5.15v

 

 

 

thanks to specmike for suggesting i use a Multimeter & Sorry again about the whole thing but as they say you live to learn. :)

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  • Corsair Employees
All of those readings are within the ATX spec, although I would suspect that the software readings are not 100% accurate, but if we are going off of the readings that you are getting, you should not have any problems.
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All of those readings are within the ATX spec, although I would suspect that the software readings are not 100% accurate, but if we are going off of the readings that you are getting, you should not have any problems.

 

Ram Guy to be honest even the guy who works at the company where i bought the corsair tx850 from who didn't stop braising your brand or service enough (the guy is in love with Corsair) but even him said he would not keep his PSU if it wasn't stable like mine (12v rail dropping to 11.56v),he recommended me to change brand since its the second PSU in a row to prove unstable.

 

could this be a possible bad batch or just the way your power supplies are ?? !!!!

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It has already been stated in your previous thread why software is not the best thing to read voltages from. At min it should be done from the BIOS, at best from an actual multimeter.

 

Feel free to RMA through Corsair if you like, but this may not solve anything if the software reading the voltages is incorrect. I would strongly recommend to check the BIOS' readings at the least, as it does not seem as if you have done this yet (but I may have missed that if you did say you did it).

 

If you feel that the current ATX power specs are just not up to what you require, then I would search for a PSU that does what you are looking for.

 

Your friend's readings are irrelevant as they are again through software, not to mention on entirely different hardware. If you try your PSU on his rig this may help to determine what the issue is. The other way around may not work, as his PSU may not be able to provide enough juice for your hardware.

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I honestly cannot understand why you are obsessing over readings from a piece of free sofware. Did you not read and/or understand the information below? Have you even taken time to compare the software readings with the voltage readings in the BIOS?

 

http://www.houseofhelp.com/forums/showthread.php?t=76917

 

if its UNRELIABLE software then why did it report the enermax voltage as rock solid under normal & full load ?? i dont really understand
That's EXACTLY why it is unreliable. These software monitors often change what they report if you flash the BIOS because the BIOS calibrates the sensors. A person could write BIOS code that would cause a software program to indicate that a PSU is putting out 50,000v or any value they wanted. The reporting can change even if you put in a different CPU, etc.

 

Also, they are only measuring the voltages AFTER they are regulated by the MOBO based on feedback from sensors on the MOBO. Therefore, any result from software is NOT RELIABLE as you cannot state the source of the variance. That's why good technicians use hardware to test and assess PSUs and not software.

 

The simple variance between 2 rails on 2 different PSUs can skew what the software monitor will show you. The AC voltage coming into your home can influence all of this also. And, you would likely see different numbers in a software program if you ran the PSU on US 110-120AC vs EU 220-240AC.

 

And, software monitoring is simply software code. It is revised frequently such as the newest 5.0 version of Everest. So, an older version of Everest may show a different reading on a given MOBO. It could easily show 2 very different readings between 2 different MOBOs using the same PSU for testing.

 

So, the reasons go on and on and on why software monitoring is NOT reliable for diagnosing PSU issues or assessing quality.

 

but i was at least expecting a rock solid 12v rail not a poor voltage performance.

Since you have no way of measuring this, I'll ask again. Are you actually having issues with your PSU or only your software?:confused: Nothing you have stated indicates a PSU issue or lack of quality.

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Have you even taken time to compare the software readings with the voltage readings in the BIOS?.

 

i just did

 

bios 12v rail reads 11.898

 

everest 12v rail reads 11.98

 

those are ofcourse the idle readings but once i load a game the 12v rail goes as low as 11.56 which is very bad.

 

this is a comment from ASUS admin:

Ensuring that you get steady, solid DC voltage to your CPU, RAM and other components is vitally important.
& for this reason i'm worried my hardware could be damaged using this corsair psu.
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i just did

 

bios 12v rail reads 11.898

 

everest 12v rail reads 11.98

 

those are ofcourse the idle readings but once i load a game the 12v rail goes as low as 11.56 which is very bad.

 

this is a comment from ASUS admin: & for this reason i'm worried my hardware could be damaged using this corsair psu.

 

11.898v reported from the people that made the motherboard and 11.98 from free software from the internet that is not designed for your specific MOBO. Care to take a guess as 2 why you are seeing 2 different voltages reported here? You are seeing 11.898v in the BIOS when the system is very lightly loaded. Yet, you see a HIGHER voltage reported by Everest when the OS is running and the system is pulling more current. This makes no sense and is not logical which is yet another indicator that you cannot rely on these readings from SOFTWARE.

 

ASUS and every other MOBO maker on the planet also advise to adhere to PSUs that fall within the ATX design specifications. That's the specifications that they design around. GPU manufacturers, HD manufacturers, etc etc etc also go by this standard. This unit clearly meets those standards. So, even if you DO believe Everest, you are seeing MOBO readings, NOT PSU readings. This is why it takes specialized equipment to take these readings, NOT FREE SOFTWARE DOWNLOADED ON THE INTERNET.

 

First, the measurements you are using cannot be relied upon to be accurate. REMEMBER, YOU ARE SEEING VOLTAGE MEASUREMENTS TAKEN AFTER THE MOBO HAS REGULATED THEM. YOU ARE NOT SEEING AN ACTUAL MEASUREMENT OF OR READING FROM THE PSU ITSELF! EVEREST IS NOT CONNECTED TO THE PSU AT ALL IN ANY WAY, PERIOD. EVEREST IS READING THE SENSORS ON THE MOBO, WHICH REPORT VOLTAGES AFTER THEY ARE REGULATED BY THE MOBO. So, your MOBO voltage regulation is more likely off than the PSU in this case if you insist on believing free software instead of hardware.

 

Second, even "IF" your Everest measurements are correct, they are STILL WELL WITHIN ATX SPECIFICATIONS. 11.56v IS WELL WITHIN THE ATX STANDARD. THIS WILL NOT DAMAGE YOUR HARDWARE.

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Ram Guy to be honest even the guy who works at the company where i bought the corsair tx850 from who didn't stop braising your brand or service enough (the guy is in love with Corsair) but even him said he would not keep his PSU if it wasn't stable like mine (12v rail dropping to 11.56v),he recommended me to change brand since its the second PSU in a row to prove unstable.

 

Can this person use a meter or oscilloscope to check these PSUs? That is the ONLY reliable way to "prove unstable" your PSU since you are not actually experiencing any symptoms of instability.

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I have seen this issue before. You may have a mainboard issue with voltage regulation. Certainly two PSU's bringing this issue about is indicative of an external event.

 

The only way to be certain is to test this PSU in another system. Test at the PSU 24pin with a Digital Multi-Meter and set the system to idle and full load.

 

Then repeat with your board.

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problem solved:

 

http://img3.imageshack.us/img3/3558/everst.jpg

 

i have sent error report to everest about their latest version of the software which has a glitch in reporting 12v rail voltage & cpu temperature,i installed the older version which i used to use with my old psu & everything is now displayed correctly.

 

please guys accept my apology & if you dont mind please delete both of my threads because they show up in google search & i dont want people to think bad about these highly rated psu's.

 

thanks guys for been patient with me i really appreciate it it makes me feel i made the right choice just for the good customer service. i will be keeping this psu (can't go wrong with 5 year warranty & 70a). again i'm really sorry for the whole issue.

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And, software monitoring is simply software code. It is revised frequently such as the newest 5.0 version of Everest. So, an older version of Everest may show a different reading on a given MOBO. It could easily show 2 very different readings between 2 different MOBOs using the same PSU for testing.

 

I am VERY glad to hear you consulted Everest. In my opinion they do make a great product but, they are at the mercy of the info they are given by the motherboard. Their quick response is indicative of their effort to keep their software updated.

 

 

And, I too apologize if I came across as abrasive or inappropriate. I hope you are satisfied with your PSU.

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Fiery (Owner of Lavalys) is a great responder. A Digital multimeter is always the best way to go.

 

 

I am VERY glad to hear you consulted Everest. In my opinion they do make a great product but, they are at the mercy of the info they are given by the motherboard. Their quick response is indicative of their effort to keep their software updated.

 

 

And, I too apologize if I came across as abrasive or inappropriate. I hope you are satisfied with your PSU.

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I don't see any need to delete the threads. I can update the other one if you like. Regardless of some of the content, we prefer to leave our threads totally unedited unless absolutely necessary. This way, our customers get honest information from us.

 

In this particular instance, you perservered and went to Everest and found a solution. So, this could be useful to other users in the future. :sunglasse

 

Please let me know if you want to update the other thread and I will unlock it or simply post a link to this thread.

 

Thank you for choosing Corsair!

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And, I too apologize if I came across as abrasive or inappropriate. I hope you are satisfied with your PSU.

 

no not at all you were right all the way,i'm happy with the service i received from you guys & from your dealer more than the psu itself because to be honest i'm new to corsair & yet to find out how the psu perform but with 5 year warranty & the great reputation your products have i cannot go wrong at all.in fact i can't find a better deal no matter where i go to.

 

thanks all for the great support guys & please delete both of my threads.

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I don't see any need to delete the threads. I can update the other one if you like.

update it then please with a link to this thread.

 

also Ram Guy i tried to send you a PM to thank you for the support but you dont accept PM's. :D:

 

many thanks for your patience & support .

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UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE

 

Today i received my Multimeter from ebay ( cheap & mini ) & i have tested the 12v Rail & the 5v Rail & Results are As Follow:

 

12v idle 12.07v to 12.08v

 

5v tested & its 5.14v to 5.15v

 

 

 

thanks to specmike for suggesting i use a Multimeter & Sorry again about the whole thing but as they say you live to learn. :)

 

ps: both threads updated.

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As stated before, the BIOS and monitoring software read the voltages are read after they have been regulated by the circuitry on the motherboard. If the BIOS or software reports voltages dropping under load, then its most likely the VRM's struggling a little bit with the current.
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As stated before, the BIOS and monitoring software read the voltages are read after they have been regulated by the circuitry on the motherboard. If the BIOS or software reports voltages dropping under load, then its most likely the VRM's struggling a little bit with the current.

 

ok thanks for the very useful reply,is it possible i can test the voltages after they've passed through the motherboard with a multimeter ??

 

Multi-meter vs. Motherboard: A Study of Voltage Readings

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