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TR3X6G1600C8D in an 8 GB pack?


N3TD3ViL

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Okay, here's the deal, I'm wanting to purchase 8GB of this ram -

 

TR3X6G1600C8D

 

However, I can only find it in 3GB or 6GB kits, why is this? I'd have to purchase 2-6GB kits and then I'd have to remaining modules after filling all 4 dimms for a total of 2GB per slot.

 

Is there no possible way to purchase the (3x2GB) kit and purchase an additional 2GB module, or maybe purchase a (2x4GB) kit or a (4x2GB) kit? :confused::confused::confused:

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If you want 4 Gig I would suggest using TWIN3X4096-1600C7DHX but these would not be suggested for an X58 Chipset. And if you install more than one set of these the memory frequency should be set to DDR1066 or DDR1333.
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If you want 4 Gig I would suggest using TWIN3X4096-1600C7DHX but these would not be suggested for an X58 Chipset. And if you install more than one set of these the memory frequency should be set to DDR1066 or DDR1333.

 

I have an nForce 790i Ultra SLI / LGA 775. If this ram won't run at the advertised speeds of 1600mhz but run at 1333mhz instead, what's the point of buying faster memory?

 

So, 8gb of this won't run at the advertised DDR3-1600mhz speeds, but will run at DDR3-1333mhz instead?

 

TW3X4G1600C9DHX

 

http://c1.neweggimages.com/NeweggImage/productimage/20-145-200-05.jpg

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TR3X6G1600C8D is for Intel Core i7 systems that use 3 stick kits. It has not been tested on dual channel systems.

 

Corsair Compatibility Site

 

Use that link to look up which memory is compatible with your motherboard. Note that the only Quad kit (8 GB) is for DDR2, not DDR3. If you choose to get 2 pairs of DDR3 memory, note that since they have not been tested together that it is not guaranteed to be compatible with each other, let alone the max speed to be reached when running 4 sticks. Not to mention the fact that maxing out the memory controller often results in having to lower the memory speed anyway.

 

Also, this memory is NOT sold separately. You can check this out on Corsair's website for yourself.

 

Please do not create multiple threads about the same subject. Your threads have been merged.

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Well, my pc isn't listed as I have the one of the newest of the Dell line which is the XPS 730. :confused: I was really wanting to go with Corsair but since it's not even guaranteed to be compatible with the same series then it would be a waste. This is nuts.
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The DRAM you are looking at is in triple channel for Core i7. You need Dual Channel kits of 2 modules for your machine.

 

If you populate all four DRAM slots, then you are advised to drop the DRAM bandwidth and raise the memory controller voltage.

 

So, you are advised to drop the bandwidth to 1333Mhz if you populate four slots of 1600Mhz. 1066Mhz if you populate with four slots of 1333Mhz..

 

The only memory Corsair supports in a four DRAM slot population is their Quad kits. There are no Quad kits in DDR3. This does not mean two dual kits or even worse two dual kits of different versions will not work together, just that you have no recourse to RMA Corsair if they do not work together. If there are problems with the DRAM modules, they are still supported via lifetime warranty, but that is for physical defects and errors in a two stick kit mode. Matched Quad sets are highly binned modules for a four slot population. The Dual sets are tested as a kit, not a Quad and warranted as a dual kit, not a Quad setup. You need to Memtest them as Kits (2 modules, not as a four DRAM slot population). If they fail as a kit or singly, then you have RMA. Keep in mind that there is no support for mixing and matching different versions of DRAM either since different version are of different fabrications and/or manufacturers. They might work, they might not work, but you have no support if they do not work. Thus you are advised to buy all the DRAM at the same time and in this way be more assured of getting the same versions. If you buy online, be sure to specify same versions of the modules and do not expect even then that they will work and again, no support unless you purchase a quad kit.

 

For a four DRAM slot population of 1600Mhz DRAM you are advised to drop the bandwidth to 1333Mhz and raise the NB Voltage +.2v. You can then attempt to recoup some lost bandwidth via the CPU <--> MCH <--> DRAM overclock. Once stability is found, you can then, if you wish, attempt to regain some of the lost bandwidth of the CPU <--> MCH <--> DRAM stream with an overclock. First stability is necessary as some motherboards, even though they state a four slot population, will not work with stability on a four slot population and need to be RMA'd. So, first stabilty, then overclock.

 

Please research this thread:

 

http://www.houseofhelp.com/v3/showthread.php?t=64360&highlight=Unpredictable+results+QUAD2X4096+Gigabyte+X38-DS5

 

There is a limitation of the On Motherboard (Intel) memory controller or On CPU (AMD) and a population of all four banks at the full speed of a two bank run. This limitation is across the board with both AMD and Intel chipset based boards, DDR, DDR2 and DDR3.

 

Keep in mind that often issues can arise in the longer term even though you have shorter term stability. The issues seldom damage the DRAM unless you raise the DRAM voltage too high. They damage the on CPU (AMD) memory controller which has a harder time keeping up with the demands of a four DRAM slot population being run as fast as a two DRAM slot population. This is why you are advised to perform the DRAM lowering and MCH Voltage raising.

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Clearly you don't want to listen to reason and have already made your mind up without investigating the reasons.

 

I doubt if I can help you since I would just be adding to more of your stated "Bull".

 

This bull is confusing.

 

I guess I'd just be better off sticking with 4gb of ram, right?

 

Yes, if you want to run non overclocked and at the speed of a two module kit. Running a two kit four module solution at the speed of a two module kit needs tweaking and sometimes it doesn't work necessitating RMA of the mainboard.

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Clearly you don't want to listen to reason and have already made your mind up without investigating the reasons.

 

I doubt if I can help you since I would just be adding to more of your stated "Bull".

 

I'm listening, it's just that none of this is making ANY kind of sense. WHY or HOW can I have a motherboard that will support 8GB of ram if it will only cause me problems? I don't overclock anything, even the least little bit. All I'm wanting to do is get the best performance out of my ram configuration. So, since I don't seem to be making any sense, maybe you can tell me how that can be achieved. I presently have 4gb of Elpida, whatever that is, DDR3-1333 ram in my chipset. It came with the XPS 730. I'd like to upgrade it to something more reputable.

 

I've run CPU-Z and this is what it came up with. I don't know what I'm looking at here.

 

http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/8977/wtfse4.jpg

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You read my post in that time? And the link I gave you? I am trying to give you information that once you have read (actually read and not skimmed) for the purposes of understanding I can then try and help you with determining what route to go.

 

But you do really need to read that thread and the link carefully to understand somewhat and so I don't have to continually repeat the more basic reasoning.

 

So, read that thread carefully and post back here. I'll be around :):

 

I'm listening, it's just that none of this is making ANY kind of sense. WHY or HOW can I have a motherboard that will support 8GB of ram if it will only cause me problems? I don't overclock anything, even the least little bit. All I'm wanting to do is get the best performance out of my ram configuration. So, since I don't seem to be making any sense, maybe you can tell me how that can be achieved. I presently have 4gb of Elpida, whatever that is, DDR3-1333 ram in my chipset. It came with the XPS 730. I'd like to upgrade it to something more reputable.
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Okay, if I'm understanding what I'm reading...while my mobo can support 8gb, it can't support it at the specified speed so it will underclock it i.e. the DDR3-1600 will drop to 1333 in 8gb config and the 1333 would drop to the 1066 config? Did I read that correctly? Or, would the 1600 even drop to as low as 1066mhz?

 

I guess what I should be asking is, for what I do (gaming), would it even be beneficial for me to run 8gb of ram? Right now, with 78 processes running, it's using 38% of my 4gb and when I start playing COD4, it goes up to nearly 80%.

 

**EDIT**

 

I just found this review on Newegg:

 

Pros: big.... quick... and for DDR3 relativly inexpensive

 

Cons: was a pain to get running stable. tried the specs on the ram (1600MHz 9-9-9-24) and all sorts of blue screens ensued. Quick call to corsair and they got me squared away.

 

Other Thoughts: turns out my problem the memory was auto detected as 9-9-9-26-1t, I changed it to 9-9-9-24-1t, but Corsair techie let me know it should be 2t. and if you plan to run 8Gb of this, as I am, plan to run at 1333MHz.

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Good stuff. Now you have an understanding. So let me clarify. Motherboards state a maximum speed and and a maximum capacity but not a maximum speed at at that maximum capacity. In other words, a 1600Mhz maximum speed is supported and 8GB maximum capacity.

 

This does not mean that the motherboard will not run at that full speed and capacity. It is harder on the memory controller though and so it is advised to drop the DRAM speed to make it easier on the memory controller in terms of system longevity.

 

You are currently running with 1333Mhz X 4 slots populated and are running them at the full speed of the DRAM. If you came here with 1333Mhz X 2 and asked if you could add another two modules you would be told that it is advised to drop that speed to 1066Mhz. It is easier on the memory controller to run with 4 X 1024 than it is 4 X 2048. It is easier on the memory controller to run 2 X 2048 than it is 4 X 1024. The memory controller has to load and access two banks rather than four and the greater the populated banks the more work the memory controller has to perform.

 

There are those who can install 4 X 2048 and run them at the full bore without any short or long term problems. Some can not even get their motherboard to boot with such an installation. It all depends on the memory controllers (Located on the motherboard and called MCH (Memory Controller Hub) or Northbridge) quality.

 

It's just not a given and I personally wish it was because this is the most posted issue on all the RAM sites.

 

Do you want to go with 8GB? If so, I would purchase 8GB of 1600C9.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145200

 

@ $79.00 after $25.00 Mail-In Rebate X 2 = $158.00 for 8GB. I would set to 1600Mhz and test for stability. If it doesn't make 1600Mhz, then you can drop to 1333Mhz.

 

Your Dell has a modified BIOS where many of the settings (that such a motherboard as your Dell has) have been removed. So you are not going to be able to change voltages to many areas other than memory voltage. Still, it should work, but you may have to run them lower than if they were inserted in a two module population.

 

Hopefully this makes sense to you. As well, you are luckier than some. You already are sure that all four slots will work well together. Some never know this until they purchase another set and find that the memory controller has issues with even a four slot population at any speed.

 

 

 

Okay, if I'm understanding what I'm reading...while my mobo can support 8gb, it can't support it at the specified speed so it will underclock it i.e. the DDR3-1600 will drop to 1333 in 8gb config and the 1333 would drop to the 1066 config? Did I read that correctly? Or, would the 1600 even drop to as low as 1066mhz?

 

I guess what I should be asking is, for what I do (gaming), would it even be beneficial for me to run 8gb of ram? Right now, with 78 processes running, it's using 38% of my 4gb and when I start playing COD4, it goes up to nearly 80%.

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No problem. With the 1333Mhz memory still installed, enter BIOS and increase the Northbridge voltage +.2v and set the DRAM to 1.8v. Shut the system down. Insert one stick of 1600Mhz (slot closest to the CPU), test for boot and shut down. Insert the second stick in slot 2 and test for boot. Shut the system down, insert the third stick and test for boot. Finally, insert the last stick and boot to the Memtest CD and allow for two full passes.

 

Download Memtest86+ V2.11 from--->

and extract the ISO image. Burn the ISO image to an CD-ROM disk.

 

Actually, that's the ram I've had in mind. Oh, and with the XPS 730/730x they left the bios unlocked so you can tweak the timings and voltages at will. Thanks for your patience an input!
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The memory DerekT recommened is PROBABLY compatible, but since Corsair has not listed the Dell 730 / 730X models on the configurator, they cannot guarantee that their memory is compatible with your system. I would wait for an official answer before buying anything.
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That's probably the safest advice.

 

The memory DerekT recommened is PROBABLY compatible, but since Corsair has not listed the Dell 730 / 730X models on the configurator, they cannot guarantee that their memory is compatible with your system. I would wait for an official answer before buying anything.
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Actually, any of the kits at this link will run perfect with a 790i MOBO.

 

http://www.corsairmemory.com/products/xms3dhx/default.aspx

 

And, DerekT and Wired have detailed the limits of 4 modules well. You may actually be able to run 1600 with 4 modules of the 1600s, but it wll take a bit of luck and tuning the BIOS. The determining factor will be the memory controller on your board.

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Well, my pc isn't listed as I have the one of the newest of the Dell line which is the XPS 730.
He's got a Dell 730 with a 790i.

 

Actually, any of the kits at this link will run perfect with a 790i MOBO.

 

http://www.corsairmemory.com/products/xms3dhx/default.aspx

 

And, DerekT and Wired have detailed the limits of 4 modules well. You may actually be able to run 1600 with 4 modules of the 1600s, but it wll take a bit of luck and tuning the BIOS. The determining factor will be the memory controller on your board.

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Well, after all of this mess, I decided it may be more headache than it's worth to run 8gb of ram and for what I do, which is online gaming, 8gb is overkill. That being said, I decided to purchase two of the TW3X2G1600C9DHX kits. Oh, and DerekT, thanks for the explanation on how to install and begin testing the water with the new ram. I'll keep you posted as to how it goes.
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