Jump to content
Corsair Community

XMS and Value Select incompatible?


notwenam

Recommended Posts

I have an Asus A8V-VM with 1mb of memory which has run rock steady with Bios settings on Auto for a year or more. I noticed that my XMS 2 sticks of 512 was CAS2 so I used manual settings to select 200mhz and CAS2. Again rock steady. Then I fancied upgrading to 3mb and bought 2 x 1024 of Value select. XMS seemed so expensive and I am not a speed freak so CAS3 will do for me.

 

With all 4 sticks in (paired up) The memory runs at 157.2 MHz (CPU/14) CAS3 even if I try to force 200MHz in the BIOS. Each of the stick on thier own or with their partner runs at 200MHz with BIOS on auto.

 

Can anybody tell me what is going on?

 

The following are extracts from CPUZ.txt

 

Processors Information

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Processor 1 (ID = 0)

Number of cores 1 (max 1)

Number of threads 1 (max 1)

Name AMD Athlon 64 3500+

Codename Venice

Specification AMD Athlon 64 Processor 3500+

Package Socket 939

CPUID F.F.2

Extended CPUID F.2F

Brand ID 4

Core Stepping DH-E6

Technology 90 nm

Core Speed 2200.1 MHz (11.0 x 200.0 MHz)

HT Link speed 1000.1 MHz

Stock frequency 2200 MHz

Instructions sets MMX (+), 3DNow! (+), SSE, SSE2, SSE3, x86-64

L1 Data cache 64 KBytes, 2-way set associative, 64-byte line size

L1 Instruction cache 64 KBytes, 2-way set associative, 64-byte line size

L2 cache 512 KBytes, 16-way set associative, 64-byte line size

FID/VID Control yes

max FID 11.0x

VID range 1.100 V - 1.450 V

Features XD

K8 Thermal sensor yes

K8 Revision ID 4.2

Attached device PCI device at bus 0, device 24, function 0

Attached device PCI device at bus 0, device 24, function 1

Attached device PCI device at bus 0, device 24, function 2

 

Chipset

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Northbridge VIA K8M890CE rev. 00

Southbridge VIA VT8251 rev. 00

Graphic Interface AGP

AGP Revision 3.0

AGP Transfer Rate 8x

AGP SBA supported, enabled

Memory Type DDR

Memory Size 3072 MBytes

Channels Dual

Memory Frequency 157.2 MHz (CPU/14)

CAS# 3.0

RAS# to CAS# 3

RAS# Precharge 3

Cycle Time (tRAS) 7

Bank Cycle Time (tRC) 10

DRAM Idle Timer 16

Command Rate 2T

 

 

Memory SPD

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

DIMM #1

 

General

Memory type DDR

Manufacturer (ID) Corsair (7F7F9E0000000000)

Size 1024 MBytes

Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)

Part number VS1GB400C3

Serial number E5493C00

 

Attributes

Number of banks 2

Data width 64 bits

Correction None

Registered no

Buffered no

Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts

EPP no

XMP no

 

Timings table

Frequency (MHz) 166 200

CAS# 2.5 3.0

RAS# to CAS# delay 3 3

RAS# Precharge 3 3

TRAS 7 8

 

 

DIMM #2

 

General

Memory type DDR

Manufacturer (ID) Corsair (7F7F9E0000000000)

Size 1024 MBytes

Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)

Part number VS1GB400C3

Serial number 054A3C00

 

Attributes

Number of banks 2

Data width 64 bits

Correction None

Registered no

Buffered no

Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts

EPP no

XMP no

 

Timings table

Frequency (MHz) 166 200

CAS# 2.5 3.0

RAS# to CAS# delay 3 3

RAS# Precharge 3 3

TRAS 7 8

 

 

DIMM #3

 

General

Memory type DDR

Manufacturer (ID) Corsair (7F7F9E0000000000)

Size 512 MBytes

Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)

Part number CMX512-3200C2

 

Attributes

Number of banks 2

Data width 64 bits

Correction None

Registered no

Buffered no

Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts

EPP no

XMP no

 

Timings table

Frequency (MHz) 133 166 200

CAS# 2.0 2.5 3.0

RAS# to CAS# delay 2 3 3

RAS# Precharge 2 3 3

TRAS 6 7 8

 

 

DIMM #4

 

General

Memory type DDR

Manufacturer (ID) Corsair (7F7F9E0000000000)

Size 512 MBytes

Max bandwidth PC3200 (200 MHz)

Part number CMX512-3200C2

 

Attributes

Number of banks 2

Data width 64 bits

Correction None

Registered no

Buffered no

Nominal Voltage 2.50 Volts

EPP no

XMP no

 

Timings table

Frequency (MHz) 133 166 200

CAS# 2.0 2.5 3.0

RAS# to CAS# delay 2 3 3

RAS# Precharge 2 3 3

TRAS 6 7 8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Corsair Employees
When you are mixing different memory modules, you are often mixing modules with very different SPDs, different ICs, operating characteristics, etc. The motherboard will then have to try to use more conservative settings to allow the different memory types to coexist. For these reasons, mixing memory is not advised. Also, on the system you have, it is common for the memory controller to run the memory at a slower speed with 3 or 4 modules as compared to 2 modules due to the extra load.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok thanks for that info. So optional upgrade paths would be.....

 

a/ Get 2x1024 xms to match the 2x512 I have, would I then get 200MHz cas2?

b/ Get 1x1024 VS to match the 2x1024 VS I have , would I then get 200Mhz cas2.5

c/ Start over and get 2x2048 sticks if such a thing exists in PC3200?

 

What do you suggest?

 

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok thanks for that info. So optional upgrade paths would be.....

 

a/ Get 2x1024 xms to match the 2x512 I have, would I then get 200MHz cas2?

b/ Get 1x1024 VS to match the 2x1024 VS I have , would I then get 200Mhz cas2.5

c/ Start over and get 2x2048 sticks if such a thing exists in PC3200?

 

What do you suggest?

 

Mike

 

C is not possible. A is possibly (but somewhat improbable) workable and b is the most workable if you match and drop the bandwidth from 400Mhz to 333Mhz. Anytime you populate with four DRAM slots you need to be happy with whatever speed you get. If I were you, I would go with the VS as it will be the most compatible method (b).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
C is not possible.

 

Practically speaking, that's true. This is because the only unbuffered 2GB DDR1 memory modules ever made have the ECC feature. (The AMD on-die memory controller supports ECC, but not all motherboards implement this support properly.) And since very, very few such modules were ever manufactured, those modules were - and still are - astronomically expensive to buy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...