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Are my ram modules compatible with my system?


Elyth

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It depends on the Front Side Bus (FSB) speed of your processor (CPU). That Matsonic motherboard theoretically supports DDR400 (PC3200) memory - but only if your processor's effective FSB speed is 800MHz (as dictated by Intel's recommended processor FSB/memory ratio specification for DDR1 systems, which recommends a maximum true memory clock speed of not more than +/-33MHz above or below the true clock speed of a processor's FSB). In the recommended case, the true processor FSB clock speed (of an FSB800 processor) and the true memory clock speed (of DDR400 memory) would be exactly equal - 200MHz.

 

However, in the case of your particular processor (which runs on a true FSB clock speed of only 133MHz, with an effective FSB speed of 533MHz), DDR400 memory is not recommended because there are a lot of DDR400 modules whose SPD "knows" only the full rated DDR400 speed and no slower speeds (e.g. DDR333) at all. The Intel recommended divider ratio spec for DDR1 systems recommends that you run no faster than DDR333 (PC2700) memory with your particular CPU. (This means that you could try to run your DDR400 memory at the full DDR400 speed with your CPU and motherboard, but then your system might experience stability issues due to the FSB/memory divider ratio being so far out of spec as the true clock speed differential between DDR400 memory and an FSB533 CPU would be a whopping 67MHz.)

 

And lastly, the VIA PT800 chipset's memory controller is permanently stuck in single-channel mode. And the JEDEC DDR400 specs recommend a maximum of only two banks (which do not equal two modules/sticks) installed per memory controller channel for full-speed operation. (On the other hand, the JEDEC DDR333 spec recommends a maximum of four banks per channel for rated speed operation.) But most 1GB DDR1 modules are double-sided, which means that only one stick of memory would eat up two banks on the memory controller. As such, even if you could use two double-sided DDR400 modules on your motherboard, you might have to drop your memory's speed down to DDR333 if you have both of the memory slots filled on your motherboard in order to ensure stable operation even with an FSB800 CPU.

 

I know this sounds very complicated, but this statement explicitly illustrates the memory controller loading and synchronization issues that you would likely encounter with a reasonably modern system.

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Now i think i got all that information in my head. It looks like i can`t get my new memory modules to work with my system but it is possible to buy a pair of ddr2700? And is there some other aspects to consider as ecc or non ecc for example?
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Now i think i got all that information in my head. It looks like i can`t get my new memory modules to work with my system but it is possible to buy a pair of ddr2700? And is there some other aspects to consider as ecc or non ecc for example?

 

ECC is server based memory. Do not purchase ECC enabled DRAM or Registered memory.

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ECC is server based memory. Do not purchase ECC enabled DRAM or Registered memory.

 

I agree - on Intel processor-based systems built using motherboards with most consumer chipsets. These chipsets support neither ECC nor registered/buffered memory. The PT800, like other consumer systems' chipset memory controllers, is designed strictly for unbuffered, non-ECC memory.

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