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slipperysam

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does anyone think i couuld use this coolent as im having trouble finding a replacment. :confused: WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid algae killing fluid for watercooling £4.29 SKU: 122224 Weight: 0.40 kg Manufacturer's Part Number: 03-C-0534 See other products from ASETEK 8 stocked. This revolutionary Anti Alga Fluid eliminates the risk of bacteria and algae growth, ensures a long term - maximum - heat conductivity in cooler blocks, prevents the risk of long term degeneration of heat transfer capacity of tubes and radiator, and increases pump life time. The WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid is the most comprehensive tool on the market. It includes WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid (25ml bottle). Product Description Asetek WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid - liquid cooling system fluid Product Type Liquid cooling system fluid
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[quote name='slipperysam']does anyone think i couuld use this coolent as im having trouble finding a replacment. :confused: WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid algae killing fluid for watercooling £4.29 SKU: 122224 Weight: 0.40 kg Manufacturer's Part Number: 03-C-0534 See other products from ASETEK 8 stocked. This revolutionary Anti Alga Fluid eliminates the risk of bacteria and algae growth, ensures a long term - maximum - heat conductivity in cooler blocks, prevents the risk of long term degeneration of heat transfer capacity of tubes and radiator, and increases pump life time. The WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid is the most comprehensive tool on the market. It includes WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid (25ml bottle). Product Description Asetek WaterChill Anti Alga Fluid - liquid cooling system fluid Product Type Liquid cooling system fluid[/QUOTE] SlipperySam, It is unknown, nobody has ever used that stuff in a HC 200. If it has minerals or the solution forms a power residue on a metal surface when it dries up, then the straight answer would be NO. The micro-channels in the cold-block and the capillary paths in the HX will clog. Thus, ruining your warranty and your H2O system. Where are you that you can not go to an autoparts store and by propylene glycol? Stev
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  • 2 weeks later...
Yes, just go to an auto parts store and get a gallon of antifreeze. At around $5.00, you save $$$ on the $15-19 cost of the Corsair stuff, plus a gallon will last you forever. I did this as like you, could not get any info on replacement parts. The automotive stuff has ethylene glycol rather than propylene glycol in the Corsair product. The latter was used as it is less toxic to babies and cats. The automotive stuff might even be more effective. Just remember to mix it with water at about a 50-75% concentration, antifreeze:distilled water.
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[quote name='Clevor']Yes, just go to an auto parts store and get a gallon of antifreeze. At around $5.00, you save $$$ on the $15-19 cost of the Corsair stuff, plus a gallon will last you forever. I did this as like you, could not get any info on replacement parts. The automotive stuff has ethylene glycol rather than propylene glycol in the Corsair product. The latter was used as it is less toxic to babies and cats. The automotive stuff might even be more effective. Just remember to mix it with water at about a 50-75% concentration, antifreeze:distilled water.[/QUOTE] slipperysam, You could use the toxic basic automotive ethylene glycol, BUT, don't complain that the pump then gets too noisy. :o: Clevor is wrong about the mixture ratio, unless your driving your HydroCool with a big block chevy V8. Also, with that ratio, your thermal heat transfer will rise in temps. :roll: The proper ratio is 33% propylene glycol to 66% distilled water. Or simply put, 1/3 to 2/3 mixture. This provides for the best protection of the metal components and the lubricant for the pump. PLUS, the other benefit is achieving the best mixture ratio for getting your temps lowered. :D: Typically, these are some of the brands of propylene glycol (PG) that are sold: Sierra - [url]http://www.sierraantifreeze.com[/url] The prefered brand for the HydroCool. (use the link to find a store near you.) Sold World-Wide - Some Europe titles as, "Sierra Econazi Antifreeze" Peak RV & Marine - Same as Sierra (Arco is the parent company of both Sierra and Peak) Just pink in color vs. their Sierra brand in green. [url]http://www.peakantifreeze.com/rvmarine.htm[/url] (use the link to find a store near you.) Prestone LowTox - [url]http://www.prestone.com/tips/page2.htm[/url] AMSOIL - [url]http://www.1st-in-synthetics.com/amsoil/anitfreeze.htm[/url] Sta-Clean heavy-duty - [url]http://www.stacleanantifreeze.com/[/url] Fleetguard ES Compleat PG concentrate Texaco's: Chevron HTF-P 200 or Havoline XLC-PG (same stuff) Sold World-Wide Stev
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What is everyones opion on [I]RedLine Water Wetter[/I] or [I]Royal Purple's Purple Ice[/I] ? Also I am playing with the idea of adding an internal 5 1/4 reservior as well to increase the coolant qty. My system is running great on the H200 with original coolant, but it is comming up on a year now and I plan to flush/replace the coolant at the same time as I [B]Hopefully[/B] add Corsairs NB and VGA blocks to the system when they become available. [B]ANY SUGGESTIONS/OPINIONS[/B]
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  • Corsair Employees
I have tried the Royal Purple stuff and it made no difference at idle and very little at full load. I have not tried Water Wetter yet. The addition of extra fluid in the system would have more of an effect on system temp than using additives.
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[quote name='morrisgs']What is everyones opion on [I]RedLine Water Wetter[/I] or [I]Royal Purple's Purple Ice[/I] ? Also I am playing with the idea of adding an internal 5 1/4 reservior as well to increase the coolant qty. My system is running great on the H200 with original coolant, but it is comming up on a year now and I plan to flush/replace the coolant at the same time as I [B]Hopefully[/B] add Corsairs NB and VGA blocks to the system when they become available. [B]ANY SUGGESTIONS/OPINIONS[/B][/QUOTE] Morrisgs, If you had replaced the propylene glycol in the HC with just straight water-wetter and distilled water, you will certainly run into the dangers of corrosion between the aluminum HX and the copper cold-block. After we had tested this for two weeks, corrosion showed up extensively. Black deposits showed up numerously between the hose barb fittings and the tubing on the HX and the cold-plate. Flushing the HX showed the extent of the damage. THUS, the propylene glycol is a SAFE choice to stay with primarily in the HC. BUT, if you do use the required propylene glycol in the HC at 1/3 ratio to 2/3 mixture of distilled water and water-wetter, then your safe from the corrosion. As for the Purple Ice, If you follow the same advice above, you should be safe. We never tested that in the lab. Their web site has some good advice too. [url]http://www.royalpurple.com/prodsa/prpice.html[/url] So, keep the 33% required propylene glycol and do a mixture with the distilled water with Purple Ice. It may sound like over kill, but having no prior testing to proving it out may cost you a warranty and a dead HC. :sigh!: Like CoolGuy did mention, having a bigger reservoir will aid in better cooling. This is mentioned in a good overclocking article on OverClockers.com at: [url]http://www.overclockers.com/articles974[/url] Another cool mod without voiding the warranty other than a big reservoir is mounting a 80W-100W Peltier onto the back of the HC between the top rivet and the bottom one. The HC chassis is metal, along with the reservoir. The thermal transfer of the Peltier should be able to cool the reservoir from the back wall. Then just place a heat sink on the hot side of the Peltier. :D: Stev
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[quote name='stev'] The proper ratio is 33% propylene glycol to 66% distilled water. Or simply put, 1/3 to 2/3 mixture. This provides for the best protection of the metal components and the lubricant for the pump. PLUS, the other benefit is achieving the best mixture ratio for getting your temps lowered. Stev[/QUOTE] I agree about this, but I could only follow the directions on the Prestone label, with no feedback from Corsair (which is improving now). I do notice the temps are rising higher than with the original coolant. No big deal as I still got 7/8th of a gallon of Prestone left so I will change it tonight to 33%. I hot rod cars, so I am familiar with WaterWetter, but not sure it will help with the low temps of the HC200. Thanks for the suggestions on mods Stev. Some have said to add a shroud to the fan by gutting an existing 120 mm fan, than mounting that between the original fan and radiator. This will straighten airflow. However there is no room so you have to mount everything on an external panel. Or how about mounting an external 120 mm fan which spins faster to form a push/pull system? But I imagine the inner fan blades will speed up to match the outer fan. It's freewheeling, so I don't think it will burn out. I notice on automotive radiators, they are angled slightly to airflow to get the air to hit the surface of the fins. How about angling the radiator of the HC200 slightly to get more friction against the fins for better heat transfer?
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[quote name='Clevor']I agree about this, but I could only follow the directions on the Prestone label, with no feedback from Corsair (which is improving now). I do notice the temps are rising higher than with the original coolant. No big deal as I still got 7/8th of a gallon of Prestone left so I will change it tonight to 33%. I hot rod cars, so I am familiar with WaterWetter, but not sure it will help with the low temps of the HC200. Thanks for the suggestions on mods Stev. Some have said to add a shroud to the fan by gutting an existing 120 mm fan, than mounting that between the original fan and radiator. This will straighten airflow. However there is no room so you have to mount everything on an external panel. Or how about mounting an external 120 mm fan which spins faster to form a push/pull system? But I imagine the inner fan blades will speed up to match the outer fan. It's freewheeling, so I don't think it will burn out. I notice on automotive radiators, they are angled slightly to airflow to get the air to hit the surface of the fins. How about angling the radiator of the HC200 slightly to get more friction against the fins for better heat transfer?[/QUOTE] Clevor, If you had check the forums here, you would find a wealth of knowledge dealing with the mixtures and modd'ing the HC. When arriving into the HydroCool forum, scroll all the way to the bottom where it mentions "Display Options". Change the "From The:" setting to the beginning. Then select the "Show Threads" button. You then can scroll through each thread on the topics that have already had questions and answers posted. The coolant question dates back to May 2003 along with the water-wetter question. I had provided info on modd'ing the HC without getting the warrenty voided. Like the one you had mention about a push/pull on the HX. And no, you do not have to angle the fans since the HX has air-center finned louvers. Due to the design package size, the width of the HC had to fit within a 6.5 inch space. Thus, one could place it atop the computer, within a computer desk cabinet (providing there is an outlet for air), and carry in a duffle bag to LAN parties. Space at LAN parties is at a premium too. Talking about hot rods, I sure miss my 1971 Plymouth 340 Wedge Gold Duster. Just in the stock factor equipment package, I was able to win challenges by my classmates that had custom racing components on their SS chevy Novas. Ah, the days of being a youth. Now my vehicles are a family fleet of minivans. Today's youth are more interested in supp'ing up computers than metal and screeching tires. Stev
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Hmmm, I will check out the earlier threads. [quote name='stev'] Talking about hot rods, I sure miss my 1971 Plymouth 340 Wedge Gold Duster. Just in the stock factor equipment package, I was able to win challenges by my classmates that had custom racing components on their SS chevy Novas. Ah, the days of being a youth. Now my vehicles are a family fleet of minivans. Today's youth are more interested in supp'ing up computers than metal and screeching tires. Stev[/QUOTE] That Duster was fast because it was light, plus you have a good rod/stroke ratio on that 340 with the high deck and long rod. I've always wanted to own a (nonmodded) '68 Hemi Dart myself, but of course, you know that is impossible now unless I am Jay Leno or win the NY State Lottery. I think only one other gearhead on the forums caught on that 'Clevor' is an acronym for Cleveland heads on a Windsor block, which is possible to do with a few slight mods. A lot of dirt track cars on a budget used to run this. Now that I'm in Japan I drive a 'car' the size of a Jetta with a 900 cc 4-cylinder engine. The roads are narrow here so you do not want a large car. My hot rodding is on hold till I get back to the States.
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Hey Stev, what do you have to say on the use of an aluminum radiator? The obvious problem is corrosion with the copper of the cooling block. But I presume Delphi went with aluminum as it has better heat dissipating abilities versus copper. Antifreeze could always be used to prevent corrosion. I say it time and time again: heatsinks with copper core and aluminum fins cool better than all copper sinks! The copper draws heat away from the CPU and the aluminum fins transfer heat to the air the most efficiently. Copper tends to hold heat too long. I did back-to-back testing of an Alpha8942 and the highly touted SKU900U. The Alpha beat it by 4 C using the same XP1700+ and same conditions. Why didn't this corroborate all the reviews? Because I USED THE EXACT SAME FAN ON BOTH! All the reviews of the Alpha are pretty old and used a relatively low cfm fan. The reviews on the SKU used more powerful fans. You should see all the SKU fanboys come crawling out of the woodwork flaming my thread. Bottom line is I got both sinks and tested them both under exact same conditions, and the Alpha with copper insert and forged aluminum fins came out on top. Moreover, the problem with the SKU is air flows straight through the fins. If the fins were angled to airflow cooling might improve.
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[quote name='Clevor']Hey Stev, what do you have to say on the use of an aluminum radiator? The obvious problem is corrosion with the copper of the cooling block. But I presume Delphi went with aluminum as it has better heat dissipating abilities versus copper. Antifreeze could always be used to prevent corrosion. [/QUOTE] When GM owned Delphi, Harrison Radiator made copper and aluminum HX's. And yes, the two were mixed in a vehicle. That is why the coolant is so important. Another benefit for having the coolant deals with the brazing solder. [quote name='Clevor'] I say it time and time again: heatsinks with copper core and aluminum fins cool better than all copper sinks! The copper draws heat away from the CPU and the aluminum fins transfer heat to the air the most efficiently. Copper tends to hold heat too long. [/QUOTE] Shhh. Don't give away the OEM industry secrets ! Water -cooling by home-brewers and home-brewing components in kits use all copper, mostly. BUT, when looking at OEM applications, what you have mention holds true. However, not in all cases. The flow, pressure and surface area cooled for thermal flow has to be evaluated first. Or the quick and dumb trial testing of both all copper and copper base with aluminum fins would give the fast answers and results. The thickness of the aluminum plays an important part as well. The ol' say of, it cuts like a knife, is another secret to performance if you understand the saying. If not, I can't let out the bag-of-tricks in this industry. :p: Stev
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BTW, I get the impression it is not possible to drain the coolant from the HC200 entirely, that there are check valves in the pump and inlet/outlet hoses to keep water in them should the reservoir run dry (as a safeguard). So to change coolant, I've been emptying the reservoir, filling it with distilled water, then circulating it 1-2' then emptying the reservoir. I do this 3-4x till there is mostly water in the hoses. Question is: so what % antifreeze do I have to add to the reservoir to maintain around a 33% overall level? In other words, how much liquid is retained in the pump hoses, pump, radiator, and inlet/outlet hoses, when the reservoir is dry? Is the % of antifreeze that critical to maintain its anticorrosive properties? Like maybe 10% will still have an anticorrosive effect? Obviously it's better to err on too much antifreeze than risk corrosion in the radiator or block!
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just flush unit with the mix, and you will be good. BTW i cant believe all the fuss about the coolant for the hydro-cool unit. i have just slapped in some good ole antifreese and distilles water at a 50-50% mix, and it runs and cools fine. as far as cats and dogs, drinkin the chit, they cant get to it, unless they chew thru the hose, and if they do that, well so be it.....life is hard.
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[quote name='Clevor']BTW, I get the impression it is not possible to drain the coolant from the HC200 entirely, that there are check valves in the pump and inlet/outlet hoses to keep water in them should the reservoir run dry (as a safeguard). So to change coolant, I've been emptying the reservoir, filling it with distilled water, then circulating it 1-2' then emptying the reservoir. I do this 3-4x till there is mostly water in the hoses. Question is: so what % antifreeze do I have to add to the reservoir to maintain around a 33% overall level? In other words, how much liquid is retained in the pump hoses, pump, radiator, and inlet/outlet hoses, when the reservoir is dry? Is the % of antifreeze that critical to maintain its anticorrosive properties? Like maybe 10% will still have an anticorrosive effect? Obviously it's better to err on too much antifreeze than risk corrosion in the radiator or block![/QUOTE] Clevor, We did error on the safe side. Anything below 27% shows signs of danger towards corrosion. What we do to purge the HC's is to take a cold-block hose-clamp off from one of the quick-disconnects. Then attach a one foot 1/4" ID tubing to this quick-disconnect with the clamp. This will be your purge tube. Run the power to the HC, BUT NOT the computer. Using compressed air at 10psi max. you should be able to clear the system within a 5 minute run. The pump is designed to run dry for a period of time. The pump noise will sound bad as the coolant kept it lubricated. Once done, the HC is purged like receiving the unit new again. 150ml of propylene glycol+300ml of distilled water should fill the system. IF the mixture is still low in the reservoir, just add additional distilled water. At most, this would bring the ratio to about 30% coolant. If you run with ethylene glycol, the pump will sound louder vs. using the propylene glycol. I know that some people want the unit as quiet as possible. Running at a mixture of 50/50 will be great if you plan on running the HC outside in extreme temps like your vehicle. Why spend the money to do 50/50 when distilled water is only 58 cents at Wal-Mart for the proper mixture??? :bigeyes: Stev
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I did some research on coolants and the best heat transfer is with pure water, except it will cause corrosion. Too much antifreeze is not good either (if you've ever tried to run 100% in your car figuring it would cool better). The stuff will expand and spill over. For automotive apps 50-60% as on the Prestone label is recommended, but for the lower temps of the HC, 33% seems right. I think I will just flush the system out several times with 33% antifreeze, as it's a pain to remove the hose from the barbs on the connectors. I'm not exactly sure what I have in there now. It might be 25-33%. Still have lots of the Prestone stuff yet and distilled water is cheap so no big deal.
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[quote name='Clevor']...I think I will just flush the system out several times with 33% antifreeze, as it's a pain to remove the hose from the barbs on the connectors. ... [/QUOTE] Clevor, That should be the best method for replacing the coolant. In the lab, we would purge the units with the air hose since the units were placed on test stands and abused to the highest degree. :D: Well, it looks like we have come full circle on this coolant question. I hope. Enjoy your well crafted HC for years to come. Stev
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  • 2 weeks later...
[quote name='stev']Morrisgs, If you had replaced the propylene glycol in the HC with just straight water-wetter and distilled water, you will certainly run into the dangers of corrosion between the aluminum HX and the Delphi copper cold-block. After we had tested this for two weeks, corrosion showed up extensively. Black deposits showed up numerously between the hose barb fittings and the tubing on the HX and the cold-plate. Flushing the HX showed the extent of the damage. THUS, the propylene glycol is a SAFE choice to stay with primarily in the HC. BUT, if you do use the required propylene glycol in the HC at 1/3 ratio to 2/3 mixture of distilled water and water-wetter, then your safe from the corrosion. As for the Purple Ice, If you follow the same advice above, you should be safe. We never tested that in the lab. Their web site has some good advice too. [url]http://www.royalpurple.com/prodsa/prpice.html[/url] So, keep the 33% required propylene glycol and do a mixture with the distilled water with Purple Ice. It may sound like over kill, but having no prior testing to proving it out may cost you a warranty and a dead HC. :sigh!: Like CoolGuy did mention, having a bigger reservoir will aid in better cooling. This is mentioned in a good overclocking article on OverClockers.com at: [url]http://www.overclockers.com/articles974[/url] Another cool mod without voiding the warranty other than a big reservoir is mounting a 80W-100W Peltier onto the back of the HC between the top rivet and the bottom one. The HC chassis is metal, along with the reservoir. The thermal transfer of the Peltier should be able to cool the reservoir from the back wall. Then just place a heat sink on the hot side of the Peltier. :D: Stev[/QUOTE] I have used this Purple Ice and it is the best thing in the world. It works better than anything I have ever used in life. This brought my temp down on the Zelman Reserator 1 System over 10 degrees C cooler at full load. You have to check this out. It is better than the Glycol and especailly better than antifreeze. CHECK IT OUT. Chris
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  • 2 weeks later...
[quote name='stev']Morrisgs, If you had replaced the propylene glycol in the HC with just straight water-wetter and distilled water, you will certainly run into the dangers of corrosion between the aluminum HX and the Delphi copper cold-block. After we had tested this for two weeks, corrosion showed up extensively. Black deposits showed up numerously between the hose barb fittings and the tubing on the HX and the cold-plate. Flushing the HX showed the extent of the damage. THUS, the propylene glycol is a SAFE choice to stay with primarily in the HC. BUT, if you do use the required propylene glycol in the HC at 1/3 ratio to 2/3 mixture of distilled water and water-wetter, then your safe from the corrosion. As for the Purple Ice, If you follow the same advice above, you should be safe. We never tested that in the lab. Their web site has some good advice too. [url]http://www.royalpurple.com/prodsa/prpice.html[/url] So, keep the 33% required propylene glycol and do a mixture with the distilled water with Purple Ice. It may sound like over kill, but having no prior testing to proving it out may cost you a warranty and a dead HC. :sigh!: Like CoolGuy did mention, having a bigger reservoir will aid in better cooling. This is mentioned in a good overclocking article on OverClockers.com at: [url]http://www.overclockers.com/articles974[/url] Another cool mod without voiding the warranty other than a big reservoir is mounting a 80W-100W Peltier onto the back of the HC between the top rivet and the bottom one. The HC chassis is metal, along with the reservoir. The thermal transfer of the Peltier should be able to cool the reservoir from the back wall. Then just place a heat sink on the hot side of the Peltier. :D: Stev[/QUOTE] Stev, I've been thinking about doing this and maybe using this pelt: [url]http://becooling.safeshopper.com/10/15.htm?737[/url] or similiar (which would you suggest?). would it be too much draw powering the pelt from the power to the H200 or would I need to run another power line from the pwr supply to the pelt. I'm sure my pwr supply can handle the draw (see signature)
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morrisgs, I would run it directly from your PSU with an in-line fuse of course. A 500W PSU under load may draw the 8-10amps without tripping it. If your PSU trips, then getting a separate PSU from a surplus place would help. The HC has a relay on the PCI board. So using it would not work in this application. Also, protect the thin wires from the peltier to the computer using shrink tubing or such like it. Black would match the color scheme well. Have you thought about cooling the hot side of the peltier yet? Will it be a typical heat sink or on with a small snap on fan? Stev
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Stev, I was thinking about possibly a small HS and maybe even low db fan. Haven't quite finished planning it all out just yet. I had my H200 on the table yesterday looking at my choices. I see the reservoir is rivited to the back wall with a bracket, if I were able to get the pelt in contact with the res directly I'm sure I would see greater temp improvement than just attached to the chasis. Not sure if I want to but if I were to drill out the rivets holding the res in place (to protect the res) and with my Dremel cut out a square in the chasis frame slightly larger than the pelt then I would be able to attach the pelt directly to the res (after re-riveting in back in place) and have the hot side outside of the case. What do you think and would this be excessive enough to void my warranty since all I'd be permanently changing is a square cut in the chasis? Since I had my H200 on the table I went ahead and tapped the holes for the grills and replaced the plastic push pins with 8-32 mechine screws. Now I can take the top off whenever without having to remove the fan grills and filters. Stev, when you asked "Will it be a typical heat sink or on with a small snap on fan?" By snap on fan are you talking about one that snaps on a heatsink or is there a type that snaps directly to a pelt? I believe it's the prior but I'm just starting my research into pelt cooling so I thought I'd better ask. Will keep you advised as to the results and appreciate any/all inputs :eek:
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morrisgs, The best bang for the buck would be placing the peltier on the HX. BUT that wouldn't do since there is really no flat surfaces to be found there. As for cutting a hole into the case, yes, that becomes a voided warranty issue. Another engineer mentioned the thermal conditions of having a peltier on the back of the reservoir, cooling down the coolant and further down in the system blowing ambient temps onto the HX, might not prove beneficial in the thermal loop. The best place for it would be right after the HX and fan cooling. Sorry to back pedal here. :!oops: Stev
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I've made a 20 oz reservior out of a plastic canister with a screw on lid (used rubber grommets to seal airtight around the hoses) to go between my cpu and the H200 on the return line. That should a little more than double the coolant qty in the system and help lower temps (I would think). I plan to implement it after my flush when I get my NB & video blocks in. While shopping around today I had an idea as well. Lowes sell quart sized metal paint cans. What do you think about using one of those for a reservior and placing a 80watt pelt on the can? If placed on the return line would help keep the coolant even closer to ambient temps; and if placed on the feed line to the cpu might even cool it slightly below ambient but probably not enough to worry about condensation. The can would sit between the case and the H200 on the floor between the desk and the wall out of sight (see current setup attachment). What do you think? Any foreseeable problems (such as flow on the feed side)?
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Morrisgs, As long as your plastic canister doesn't leak, you should be in great shape. As for the metal paint can ... if it is "aluminum" with FLAT sides, you're in better shape. Introducing "steel" may change the corrosion requirements. The peltier needs a flat surface to mount to. I know that Lowes carries new rectangular quart size cans too. Make sure these are NEW cans, since what may lurk in a used one can be a mystery. Get it? "Can" be. Ok, so I have dry humor. :biggrin: Stev
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