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Corsair COOL PUMP


muzicman82

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Ok, after having this kit for some time, I've ended up replacing almost all of the components for one reason or another. I replaced the reservoir with a Swiftech MCRES because the kit reservoir constantly sounded like trickling water.

 

I've replaced the water block with a Swiftech Apogee GT from the recommendation of others.

 

Now, it seems like this water pump is dying, even though it's rated at 5 years of life.

 

I've already ordered a Swiftech MCP350. How does this pump compare (performance wise) to this Corsair COOL pump, or are they the same model?

 

Anyone know what RPM reading I should've gotten out of the COOL kit pump?

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  • Corsair Employees

The Cool Kit has a one year warranty and if its with in a year we will be happy to replace it, please follow the link in my signature and contact our customer service they can help you with that.

 

I am sorry I do not have any performance data to compare the two pumps. I can only tell you that when we made this kit the parts we chose were the best performance to price at that time. Or we had them manufactured to our specification or made them our selves.

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I can't 100% tell if it's going out. I've used a couple different programs (Everest and nTune) to monitor the RPM of the pump. It seems like it is alternating between some 5200 RPM and 3600 RPM. Shouldn't this stay constant? It's also getting pretty warm.

 

I've already ordered that Swiftech pump... but I suppose if Corsair wants to RMA the pump, I'd keep it as a backup. Or compare the two!

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I would agree with KC that there is something in the cooling loop that's causing the pump rpm's to rise and fall. It could be blockage or maybe not.

 

Knowing that you have replaced several components already, you may have flushed the cooling loop a few times already.

 

The big question is, the flow pressure vs. the resistance of the cooling loop. If the flow is moving along well, then the pump's rpm's would rate high. If for some reason the liquid tends to back up, the pump rpm's would deminish some. A sink can hold water, but running the faucet too fast will fill the sink faster than it can drain. However, in a cooling loop, the system is sealed and the pressure and resistance work the flow in strange ways. The pump may run fast until a resistance level is reached, then the back up pressure slows it down until the flow manages through the restriction to bring the pump rpm's back up.

 

One other thing to look at is the power voltage supplied to the pump. When the pump's rpm's are low, take a reading. The Watts needed to operate the pump @ 12V at a steady state can not be compromised. With all of the extra system changes and computer upgrades you have done, calculate the maximum required watts it's going to take to run everything with headroom of 10%.

 

Stev

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